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Geneva, May 2009 The demand and supply of international transport services: The relationships between trade, transport costs and.

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Presentation on theme: "Geneva, May 2009 The demand and supply of international transport services: The relationships between trade, transport costs and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Geneva, May 2009 The demand and supply of international transport services: The relationships between trade, transport costs and effective access to global markets

2 Transport costs Trade Volumes TransportServices

3 More income to finance trade facilitation -> Better trade facilitation -> More Trade -> More income to finance trade facilitation

4 Lower Transport Costs -> More trade -> Economies of scale -> Lower Transport Costs

5 Better services -> More trade -> More income to finance infrastructure -> Better services

6 More trade -> More shipping supply -> More competition -> lower freights -> More trade

7 The challenge: Avoid a vicious circle, where high transport costs and low service levels discourage trade, which will further endear transport and reduce connectivity… Instead: Initiate a virtuous circle

8 Transport Costs Connectivity Trade

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10 Transport costs Trade Volumes TransportServices ?

11

12 Case study Caribbean Most Central American and Caribbean countries trade very little with each other. Examples: –less than per cent of Guatemala’s exports in manufactured goods are destined for Surinam, –0.24 per cent for Jamaica, –1 per cent for the Dominican Republic, and –around 8 per cent for Costa Rica. What are the main explanations for such differences?

13 Case study Caribbean: Gravity model Participation of country B in global imports is the basic determinant of the share of country A’s exports that are destined for country B. Neighbouring countries can be expected to trade more with each other than those that are not neighbours.

14 Case study Caribbean: Gravity model – what about distance? Distance / trade: negative correlation (as expected) But: the parameter for distance is not statistically significant if other variables are incorporated that capture the supply of shipping services and transport costs. Instead of distance: –number of liner shipping companies that provide direct services between a pair of countries. –Existence of direct liner shipping services. –Increase of the freight rate per TEU (twenty foot equivalent unit) by 1000 USD: Reduction of the share of country A’s exports to country B of almost half a percentage point.

15 Transport costs Trade Volumes TransportServices

16 Transport Costs Connectivity Trade

17 TradeTrade grows faster than GDP Containerized tradeContainerized trade grows even faster than trade in general Containerized port trafficContainerized port traffic grows even faster than containerized trade…

18 Containerization of trade, and access to containerized transport services are important determinants of countries’ trade competitiveness How can we measure this?

19 “Maritime connectivity” An indicator for the supply of liner shipping services (containerized trade) Ships Capacity to transport containers (TEU) Shipping companies Services Maximum ship sizes

20 Benefits of a high connectivity 1.For the user (importers and exporters): lower transport costs, more choice, higher speed and frequencies 2.Direct income for the port (private operator, port authority) 3.Indirect income if value added services can be sold

21 Freight rate per container in the Caribbean (July 2006)

22 “Connectivity” 1)Per country – in a “point” 2)Per route – between pairs of countries

23 “Connectivity” 1)Per country – in a “point” (162) 2)Per route – between pairs of countries

24 “Connectivity” 1)Per country – in a “point” (162) 2)Per route – between countries (13041)

25 1) Connectivity per country based on

26 Container ship deployment 1448

27 Number of companies 118

28 The UNCTAD “LSCI”

29 Barbados

30 Components of LSCI (country averages)

31 We have reached a peak Until very recently: In spite of the (global) process of concentration, the number of companies providing (local) services increased due to the expansion of global players into (so far) new markets

32 We have reached a peak Today: As global players are (now) covering all regions of the world, mergers among them (start to) lead to a reduction of competition on individual routes.

33 2) Connectivity per route Top 25 routes (out of ) June 2006

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35 Transport costs Trade Volumes TransportServices ?

36 Case study Caribbean 189 routes About half served by direct liner shipping services Examples: – Costa Rica – Colombia: 14 companies, 50 container ships, total capacity TEU; largest vessel 2500 TEU – Costa Rica – Jamaica: 5 companies/ 16 ships/ 17,400 TEU/ 2105 TEU maximum size – Costa Rica – Guyana: no direct services UNCTAD Transport Newsletter, Third Quarter, 2006

37 Case of Barbados

38 Case study Caribbean Determinants of connectivity Distance: (-) Trade volumes: (+) GDP per capita in exporting country (+) Port infrastructure (+)

39 Transport costs Trade Volumes TransportServices

40 Transport Costs Connectivity Trade

41 Transport costs Trade Volumes TransportServices “connectivity”

42 Transaction costs Source: World Bank, GEP 2002 International transport costs are usually higher than Customs Duties in the destination country

43 The Baltic Dry Index (BDI) Source: via Capital Link Shipping

44 Freight as % of commodities value UNCTAD, Review of Maritime Transport

45 Source: UNCTAD Freight costs for countries

46 Transport within logistics expenditures (USA) “Status of Logistics Report”, Cass Information Systems, various issues, and “Logistics Management”.

47 Source: UNCTAD

48 Lower Transport Costs -> More trade -> Economies of scale -> Lower Transport Costs

49 Better services -> More trade -> More income to finance infrastructure -> Better services

50 More trade -> More shipping supply -> More competition -> lower freights -> More trade

51 Transport costs Trade Volumes TransportServices ?

52 Transport Costs (more…) Connectivity Trade


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