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Changing attitudes of allied and German soldiers to the war over time.

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Presentation on theme: "Changing attitudes of allied and German soldiers to the war over time."— Presentation transcript:

1 Changing attitudes of allied and German soldiers to the war over time.
At the beginning of the War 1914 During the war The end of the war 1918

2 At the beginning of the War 1914
The early response to the war in Britain was one of overwhelming excitement and support. Men flocked in masses to the enlistment offices to pledge allegiance to King and country. In Germany conscription was already in place so enlisting s was not such a big event. Many of the British troops enlisted because they thought the war was going to be an adventure, which would be over by Christmas. Or they were either pressured into joining but the overall attitude was one of excitement. 'We were happy that our country had gone to war ... We were going to do great things for one another and for the folks at home. We were going to win fame and glory ... We really believed that we were going to fight for freedom, as the newspapers told us.' Officer writing to a newspaper

3 ’recruits for lord Kitcheners army’ Wolverhampton Archives, from the perspective of a British newspaper This source is useful because it shows the huge amount of British men enlisting to go to war. Shows support for the war, and the general attitude which was one of excitement

4 ‘the leaving parade’ from the perspective of British woman- ‘the world war 1914-1918’ Alfred Neeves
This source is useful because it shows the support given to the troops from woman across England for the troops leaving to fight.

5 ‘Train carriage’ ‘the world war 1914-1918’ Alfred Neeves
‘Train carriage’ ‘the world war ’ Alfred Neeves. From the German perspective. This source is useful because it shows German troops at the beginning of the war excited, and about to go into battle against the French. The writing on the train translates to ‘excursion past Paris’ which suggests the German intentions and attitudes.

6 A British officer writing to a newspaper ‘www. uea. ac
A British officer writing to a newspaper ‘www.uea.ac.uk’ from the perspective of a British soldier. 'We were happy that our country had gone to war ... We were going to do great things for one another and for the folks at home. We were going to win fame and glory ... We really believed that we were going to fight for freedom, as the newspapers told us.’ Officer writing to a newspaper This source is useful because it shows what the common British man’s attitude towards the war was, and what they wanted to achieve.

7 During the war During the war, attitudes began to change very quickly, when soldiers were faced with unbearable conditions and horrifying battles like the Somme and Verdun. On both fronts, the soldiers were becoming very war weary and compared to the beginning of the war, they were in hope that it would end as soon as possible. The poor conditions faced by the soldiers in the trenches, unbearable weather conditions, little rations, huge casualty rates and disrespect from superior officers all contributed to the changing attitudes of the soldiers during the war. 'Well we mucked in all day. Talking one thing or another. One of the Germans said to me, in excellent English too. 'Well' he said, ... 'how long do you think this damn war's going to last? I'm fed up to the neck.' 'Oh' I said, 'you're not the only ones fed up ... we're up to our necks in water and mud'. He said 'and we're the same.'' Infantryman Frank Richards,

8 Lord Kitchener ‘Your country needs you’, from the perspective of the allied politicians . ‘www.uea.ac.uk’ This source is useful because it shows how the attitudes of men have changed from men enlisting to support King and country, to being persuaded by propaganda material to enlist in the army.

9 Private J A Hopper ‘www. uea. ac
Private J A Hopper ‘www.uea.ac.uk’ from the perspective of a British soldier “Towards the end of the war, we were so fed up we wouldn't even sing 'God Save the King' in church parade. 'Never mind the King' we used to say, he was safe enough, it should have been 'God save us”.' Private J A Hopper This source is useful because it shows you how the soldiers were feeling, and how they had grown to hate the war and just wanted it to be over.

10 ‘Paschendale’ ww1.blogspot.com- from the perspective of the soldiers.
This source highlights the harsh realities the soldiers did face while at war. Harsh conditions seen in this image faced at the battle of Paschendale triggered the attitudes of the soldiers to change drastically and question the need for the War.

11 ‘Hangings’ ‘the world war 1914-1918’ Alfred Neeves from the German perspective
This picture shows mass hangings for German soldiers who revolted against their superior officers, This shows the attitudes of many soldiers at the end of the war, that they just wanted the war to be over.

12 The end of the war 1918 By the end of the war soldiers on both sides were just wanting the war to be over. Soldiers within both the German and allied forces mutinied against their superior officers showing their disregard for the long war. War weary soldiers were asking what they were fighting for and really questioning the motives of the Generals and men in Power. The end of the war came with the Germans presenting an armistice to the allies, which was signed and the war was over on the “Towards the end of the war, we were so fed up we wouldn't even sing 'God Save the King' in church parade. 'Never mind the King' we used to say, he was safe enough, it should have been 'God save us”.' Private J A Hopper

13 WWI propaganda poster, From a Woman's perspective
This poster shows that during the war, propaganda was used to pressure men to enlist. By saying that woman want their fathers, husbands and brothers to go to War.

14 Infantryman Frank Richards, after conversation with a German POW,1914‘www.uea.ac.uk’
'Well we mucked in all day. Talking one thing or another. One of the Germans said to me, in excellent English too. 'Well' he said, ... 'how long do you think this damn war's going to last? I'm fed up to the neck.' 'Oh' I said, 'you're not the only ones fed up ... we're up to our necks in water and mud'. He said 'and we're the same.'' Infantryman Frank Richards This source shows that the German and the British troops were over fighting and just wanted everything to return to normal, and it shows how drastically attitudes had changed.

15 www.qaranc.co.uk End of the War parade.
This image shows the excitement of the people after the troops returned home from the war. The soldiers received overwhelming accolades, and highlights just how happy people were to finally see that the war was over.

16 Soldiers celebrate after the Armistice was signed. www.ggww.co.uk
This images shows the feelings of excitement the soldiers had when they found out the war was over and they could go back home. It is useful because it shows how soldiers attitudes had done a full revolution and they were now happy again.


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