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PUBLIC TECHNICAL AND FURTHER EDUCATION PROVIDERS IN THE TERTIARY SECTOR Presentation to the Universities Australia 2013 Higher Education Conference Martin.

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Presentation on theme: "PUBLIC TECHNICAL AND FURTHER EDUCATION PROVIDERS IN THE TERTIARY SECTOR Presentation to the Universities Australia 2013 Higher Education Conference Martin."— Presentation transcript:

1 PUBLIC TECHNICAL AND FURTHER EDUCATION PROVIDERS IN THE TERTIARY SECTOR Presentation to the Universities Australia 2013 Higher Education Conference Martin Riordan Chief Executive Officer TAFE Directors Australia Feb 27,

2 Public Technical and Further Education Providers TDA urges COAG to recognise: 1. they play a special role in the nation’s education system and are highly valued by communities, enterprises and industry 2. they are making an increasing contribution to realising the interconnected tertiary sector required to secure Australia’s future 3. some of them are evolving into a new form of ‘mixed sector’ institution, appealing to new cohorts of students and enhancing the diversity of the tertiary sector 2

3 Public Technical and Further Education Providers TDA urges COAG to recognise: 4. greater degrees of devolution would assist them to respond more effectively to government priorities and to industry needs 5. they are well-placed to impact on the achievement of government targets four Higher Education and there are at least four options available to prudently manage the extension of Commonwealth Supported Places to enable them to do so. 3

4 Bradley: A New Tertiary System ‘The Review has considered both why a better interface between higher education and VET is now imperative as well as the broad range of ways in which it could be pursued. While the issues to be dealt with are complex, reform is vital if a fully effective tertiary system … is to be achieved. This will require significant changes …’ (Bradley Review, page 179) 4

5 Tertiary: Bradley’s Vision Equal value given to VET and HE Recognition that institutions may have a primary mission in one sector and still offer qualifications in another A shared and coordinated information base and approach to labour market analysis Capacity for the whole system to provide an integrated response to workforce needs for industries and enterprises An efficient regulatory and accountability framework Clearer and stronger pathways between the sectors 5

6 Public Technical and Further Education Providers as HEPs 6 Public Technical and Further Education Providers Registered Higher Education Providers (HEPS) 109 Number Delivering916 Number of Qualifications offered : 16 ‘Mixed Sector’ Institutions 5 ‘Dual Sector’ Universities

7 Functions of the Public University Audience Knowledge AUTONOMY- academic audience HETERONOMY – extra academic audience Instrumental knowledge PROFESSIONALPOLICY Reflective knowledge CRITICALPUBLIC Burawoy, M, ‘Redefining the Public University: Global and National Contexts’ in Holmwood, J (ed) 2012 A Manifesto for the Public University, Bloomsbury Academic

8 Functions of Public Technical and Further Education AUDIENCE FUNCTION INDIVIDUALS Student/Community Audience ENTERPRISES Enterprise/Industry Audience Technical Skills and Competencies Quadrant 1 EMPLOYMENT Quadrant 2 ENTERPRISE SUSTAINABILITY Further Education and Specialisation Quadrant 3 CAREERS/ CITIZENSHIP Quadrant 4 LABOUR MARKET PRODUCTIVITY

9 Government HE Targets On target: By 2025, 40% of all year olds will hold a qualification at bachelor level or above (currently 36.8%) At risk: By 2020, 20% of all enrolments at the undergraduate level will be of people from a low SES background (16.5% in 2010; 16.8% in 2011) 9

10 Australian Tertiary Students VETHE TOTAL STUDENTS1,799m1,193m Indigenous Students3.9%0.9% Students indicating a disability6.7%3.2% Students from outer regional, remote or very remote regions 14.8%4.8% Students from within the most disadvantaged quintile in the Index of Relative Socioeconomic Disadvantage 14.5%9.8%

11 NMIT ‘First in Family’ Students 11 Bachelor of Education (Early Years) 2011 Semester 1 Year Semester 1 Year 1 Commencing Students 6059 ‘First in Family’ 5040 %83%68%

12 Extending CSPs: Options 12 Option 1 - Extend CSP’s (TDA’s preferred option) Extend CSPs to a wider range of HE students in settings other than universities Option 2 – Cap Government contribution to CSPs As for option 1, but cap the government contribution and allow institutions to charge fees to make up the difference Option 3 – Create savings to fund more places Introduce a minimum ATAR and redirect the savings generated to support additional places for new cohorts of students in alternative pathways Option 4 – Strike a different formula for new places Apply a different funding formula for non-university places, omitting the research component. Other considerations such as skill shortage areas, qualification pathways and priority for students from low SES backgrounds might also be used as criteria.

13 THANK YOU 13 FUNDING


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