Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Participation through Information Literacy Libraries qualifying their users for knowledge society Benjamin Blinten, M.A., M.A. (LIS) School of Library.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Participation through Information Literacy Libraries qualifying their users for knowledge society Benjamin Blinten, M.A., M.A. (LIS) School of Library."— Presentation transcript:

1 Participation through Information Literacy Libraries qualifying their users for knowledge society Benjamin Blinten, M.A., M.A. (LIS) School of Library and Information Science Humboldt University Berlin

2 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 2 Overview 1. Classic approach to user instruction 2. A new paradigm: teaching information literacy 3. The participatory potential of information literacy instruction 4. Examples from United States and Germany 5. The gap between claims and reality

3 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 3 The Challenge Libraries as a place that enables users to satisfy wide range of information needs Role of librarians not only as providers, but also as active conveyors of information From gatekeepers of collections to supporters of information processes From library instruction to teaching information literacy

4 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 4 Classic approach to user instruction Harvard University Library: first catalog instruction from ~1820 Why in the U.S.? Highs and lows in 19th and 20th centuries Classic approach: library and product centered  catalogs, bibliographic research, library space, regulations Instruction became more important with electronic tools from the 1970s and 80s

5 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 5 A new paradigm: teaching information literacy Term coined by Paul G. Zurkowski (1974): „anyone who has learned to use a wide range of information sources in order to solve problems“ Final Report of the ALA Presidential Committee on Information Literacy (1989) Positioning libraries as important agents in the information society

6 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 6 Emphasis on the educational character of libraries  life-long learning New quality of user instruction not limited to library itself „learning how to learn“ as a new methodical soft skill Whole information process is adressed  various theoretical models Definition of standards based on models, e.g. ACRL standards of IL A new paradigm: teaching information literacy

7 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 7 More attention to didactic principles: Target group definition Topic and task oriented  definition of learning goals Activating methods Cooperation with teaching staff E-Learning components: Tutorials Video clips Virtual tours A new paradigm: teaching information literacy

8 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 8 Carol Kuhlthau‘s model of the information search process Source:

9 The participatory potential of information literacy instruction Simplified versus complex models of information process: IL is not only a set of working techniques! IL instruction has the potential to support: Self-awareness Creativity Active, skeptical, varied information behavior Well-founded personal position Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 9

10 The participatory potential of information literacy instruction Democratic society needs more than elections – its fabric is an information literate public: Evaluate work of politicians and parties Question media reports Define personal position in controversies Participate in societal and political discourse through internetinternet Essential skill for a society of informed citizens! Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 10

11 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 11 Examples from United States IL instruction accepted as routine task of libraries, especially at universities and large public libraries Core: library and database instruction Flexible additional content (e.g. plagiarism, web search, financial literacy) Often standard oriented Examples for course designs: Lake Land College Rhode Island University

12 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 12 Situation in Germany No tradition in user instruction Reception of American concepts from mid 90s, hot topic in 2000s Participatory potential not realized so far Now accepted as routine task, but executed on widely varying levels Concentration on bibliographic research skills Cooperative approach: IL networks, LOTSE

13 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 13 Example from Germany: University Library Freiburg Self-image as teaching library 2005: 453 events with 6149 participants, 1423 staff hours Didactical training for teaching librarians Integrated into B.A. curricula „Competence and learning center“ as sub- department devoted to IL instruction

14 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 14 The gap between claims and reality Claims of libraries: Experts in the search for quality information Experts in teaching IL Access to information for all citizens Relevance for todays‘s internet dominated knowledge society Successes: IL instruction growingly seen as standard service Embedded in more and more curricula Cooperation between public libraries and high schools 2006: IFLA guidelines on information literacy

15 Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 15 The gap between claims and reality Reality check: Seen by many as additional, not as routine task IL instruction often limited to classic library skills Librarians have often negative view of internet Not enough cooperation with teachers Role switch from supporter to teacher Course designs often didactically poor Rarely centered on actual user activities Ethical questions usually discussed in a restrictive manner (copyright, plagiarism) Creative, cooperative and participatory potentials rarely addressed

16 The gap between claims and reality If we design IL instruction that is relevant for our specific target audience and make our courses fun, creative and participatory, we will be successful! Participation through Information Literacy (Benjamin Blinten) 16

17 Thank you very much for your attention! Benjamin Blinten


Download ppt "Participation through Information Literacy Libraries qualifying their users for knowledge society Benjamin Blinten, M.A., M.A. (LIS) School of Library."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google