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School District of Philadelphia Standards-Aligned IEPs August 2011.

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1 School District of Philadelphia Standards-Aligned IEPs August 2011

2 2 Session Objectives Participants will be able to apply a six step process for developing annual measurable IEP goals Participants will be able to: Make necessary data collection decisions Establish baseline data Collect ongoing progress monitoring data Analyze data collected to make appropriate instructional changes

3 3 Agenda Welcome Warm Up Six Step Process for writing annual measurable IEP goals

4 PA Academic Standards  What students need to know and be able to do  Required by state regulation as basis for curriculum and instruction in PA schools.  Necessitate assessment, instruction, materials, strategies that are best suited to help all students achieve.  Should be reflected in IEPs

5 5 Standards and Anchors Standards  Benchmark measures define what students should know and be able to do Assessment Anchors  Provide clear examples of skills/knowledge that should be learned and will be assessed on state tests at specific grade levels

6 6 R5.B.1.1Compare characters, settings and plots Reference: B R5.B Items may ask the students to compare or explain relationships among the following: Characters: main, supporting, actions, motives and emotions/feelings; Settings: where or when the story takes place, a detail that describes the setting, or information form the text that suggests a setting; Plots: conflict, rising action, climax and resolution. Note: Items may ask students to utilize story maps or Venn diagrams to show sequence, cause & effect, and/or comparison/contrast. ASSESSMENT ANCHOR R5.B.1 Describe and interpret literary elements within and among texts. R5.B Interpretation and Analysis of Literature Standard: 1.3. Reading, Analyzing and Interpreting Literature GRADE 5 A. Read and understand works of literature. B. Compare the use of literary elements within and among texts including characters, setting, plot, theme and point of view Pennsylvania Department of Education StandardStandardAnchorAnchor

7 7 Standard: 2.1. Numbers, Number Systems and Number Relationships GRADE 8 A.Represent and use numbers in equivalent forms (e.g., integers, fractions, decimals, percents, exponents, scientific notation, square roots). B.Simplify numerical expressions involving exponents, scientific notation and using order of operations. Pennsylvania Department of Education StandardStandardAnchorAnchor

8 8 Access to General Education BRIDGE Where they need to be Where they are SDI

9 9 9 Accessing the General Education Curriculum What is meant by the general education curriculum? The full range of courses, activities, lessons, and materials routinely used by the general population of a school What is meant by access? Active engagement in learning the content and skills of the curriculum that is being taught to general education students

10 10 What is a Standards-Aligned IEP? An IEP that connects a student’s learning to grade level standards and evaluates their progress through the lens of the general education curriculum and state standards

11 Standards-Aligned IEP Goals  Are derived from the PA Academic Standards  Use language from Standards (including Big Ideas, Concepts and/or Competencies from the Standards Aligned System) and Assessment Anchor Content Standards

12 12 Characteristics of Standards Aligned Goals Address student needs identified in Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) Project student performance at the end of one year of instruction Begin from baseline of skill Describe skill attainment level Need to be prioritized: 3-5 goals Are NOT the curriculum or program State measurable, countable data Lead to visual countable progress monitoring 12

13 13 Steps to Writing Measurable IEP Goals Step 1: Consider Grade Level Standards and Content Step 2: Exam the Data Step 3: Develop the PLAAFP (baseline data) Step 4: Develop Measurable Annual Goals Step 5: Assess and Report Progress Step 6: Specially Designed Instruction (SDI), Supplementary Aids and Services, Accommodations / Modifications

14 14 Step 1 Consider Grade Level Content What is the intent of the content standard? What is the content standard saying that the student must know and be able to do?

15 15 Step 2 Exam the Data Examine classroom and student progress monitoring data to determine where the student is functioning in relation to the grade level standards Include at least 3 to 4 types of assessment data

16 16 Data Collection Decisions What kind of data will be collected? Who will collect the data? Where will data be collected? How often will data be collected?

17 17 Data Collection Decisions What type of data will be collected? Frequency or rate Fluency Percentage or accuracy Duration Latency Quality Level of Assistance Number

18 18 Data Collection Decisions Who will collect the data? Special education teacher Regular education teacher Paraprofessional Parent Related service provider Student

19 19 Data Collection Decisions Where will the data be collected? Settings (classroom, home, playground, cafeteria, community, etc.) Situations (during instruction, transitions, free time, etc.)

20 20 Data Collection Decisions How often will the data be collected? Daily Twice a week Weekly Every other week

21 21 Sample Data – Sample Items Pennsylvania System of School Assessment Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment System (PVAAS) 4Sight Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) Group Mathematics Assessment and Diagnostic Evaluation (G-MADE) Group Reading Assessment and Diagnostic Evaluation (GRADE) Student work samples WIDA (ESL assessment) Career inventories Grades (report card) Curriculum-Based Assessment (CBA) Specific skills assessment Progress monitoring in content areas related to reading, mathematics, writing Previous years’ IEP

22 22 Sample Data – Functional/Other Behavior Attendance Tardy Speech / Language  Occupational Therapy  Physical Therapy  Vision Support  Support – Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

23 23 Assessment Data Summative Assessments Formative Assessments Benchmark Assessments Screening Progress Monitoring Diagnostic Assessments

24 24 Step 3 Develop the PLAAFP Provide a summary of baseline academic achievement data/assessment data indicating what the student is currently able to do and a description of how the disability effects student’s progress in the general education curriculum

25 25 Example “Jessie’s classroom performance is inconsistent.” Does this example provide an explicit description of what Jessie is able to do?

26 26 Your perspective… What might a student’s PLAAFP look like if all assessments and data were based on instructional level? What might a student’s PLAAFP look like if all assessments and data were based on grade level? What would be missing if only formative assessment was used?

27 27 Step 4 Measurable IEP Goals Non-Measurable Annual Goal John will decrease calling out in class. Measurable Annual Goal John will increase hand raising and waiting to be called on by the teacher to 10 times per day using event recording.

28 28 Measurable Goals Just Checking Condition Student’s name Clearly defined behavior Performance criteria Example Given a random selection of 20 words from a pool of 100 words, Eva will spell 95% of the words correctly on three consecutive weekly spelling tests.

29 29 Measurable Annual Goals at a Glance Condition Name Clearly Defined Behavior Performance Criteria Describe the situation in which the student will perform the behavior. Materials, settings, accommoda- tions? Given visual cues… During lectures in math… Given active response checks… Describe behavior in measurable, observable terms. Use action verbs. What will she/he actually DO? Locate… Point to… Rank… State… The level the student must demonstrate for mastery: How well? % of the time #times/# times With the # or % accuracy “X” or better on a rubric or checklist Number of times needed to demon- strate mastery: How consistent -ly? How consistently will the student need to perform the skill(s) before considered “mastered?” Evaluation Schedule: How often? How often will the student be assessed? What will be the method of evaluation? Student’s Name

30 30 Measurable Annual Goals at a Glance Condition Name Clearly Defined Behavior Performance Criteria Describe the situation (materials, settings, accommoda- tions) in/with which the student will perform the behavior. Describe behavior (what will she/he actually DO) in measurable, observable terms using stems from standards. The level (how well?) the student must demon- strate for mastery: Number of times needed to demonstrate mastery. Evaluation Schedule (how often) and method, (measured how) Given…, he she will do this, this well, this many days/times, as measured this often using this. Student’s Name

31 31 Measurable Annual Goals at a Glance Condition Name Clearly Defined Behavior Performance Criteria Given…, he/ she will do this …, this well, this many days/ times, as measured this often using …

32 Short-term Objectives  Measurable  Developed for each annual goal  Serve as a plan for reaching the annual goal  Provide the process to objectively measure progress toward the annual goal

33 Short-term Objectives Build Toward Annual Goal 1.Sequential/Hierarchical Goal: …multiple digit, multiple addends addition problems… Basic math facts to 18 Double digit addition, no regrouping Double digit addition with regrouping 2.Target Important Skills in Domain Goal: …demonstrate appropriate social contacts… Appropriate social proximity Greet peers Request peer assistance

34 Short-term Objectives Annual Goal: Given a bank of 25 survival words, John will correctly identify the word and it’s meaning with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 daily trials. Objectives:  Given a bank of 10 survival words, John will correctly identify the word and its meaning with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 daily trials by the end of November.  Given a bank of 15 survival words, John will correctly identify the word and its meaning with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 daily trials by the end of February.  Given a bank of 20 survival words, John will correctly identify the word and its meaning with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 daily trials by the end of April. Sequential/Hierarchical

35 Short-term Objectives Annual Goal: In weekly classroom simulations, John will apply self-determination skills independently, 4 out of 5 opportunities. Objectives In weekly classroom simulations, John will call and appropriately make an inquiry about a job advertisement using telephone conduct guidelines in 4 out of 5 opportunities. In weekly classroom simulations, John will complete a standard job application, providing accurate, legible information in 5 out of 5 opportunities. In weekly classroom simulations, John will use the newspaper advertisements to develop a weekly shopping list that stays within a given budget and provides enough food in 5 out of 5 opportunities. Skills in Domain

36 Short-term Objectives While at his sheltered workshop, John will place items “in, on and under” upon request with 100% accuracy in 5 out of 6 requests as assessed weekly. Condition – While at his sheltered workshop Student’s name – John Clearly defined behavior – placing objects upon request Performance criteria Performance criterion – 100% accuracy Number – 5 out of 6 requests Evaluation schedule – weekly

37 Short-term Objectives During lunchtime, John will use a spoon or fork during meal time, as appropriate for the food he’s eating, with 1 verbal reminder per meal 4 out of 5 days. Condition – During lunchtime Student’s name – John Clearly defined behavior – use a spoon or fork, as appropriate for the food he’s eating Performance criteria – Performance criterion – 1 verbal reminder Number – 4 out of 5 days Evaluation schedule – daily (lunchtime)

38 Short-term Objectives Given her 8 th grade science or social studies text, Marie will read assigned passages aloud at a rate of 125 wpm with 90% accuracy on weekly probes. Condition – Student’s name – Clearly defined behavior – Performance criteria – Performance criterion – Number – Evaluation schedule –

39 39 Measurable Goals Just Checking Activity 1. Look at the following examples and decide if they meet the criteria for a measurable goal. 2. If the example does not meet the criteria, identify the missing part and rewrite the goal to make it measurable. 3. Be prepared to share one of your amended goals with your table group.

40 40 Measurable Goals Just Checking Activity 1.Bruce will clap his hands when he hears the target sound produced during a series of isolated sound productions (e.g. ssss, rrr, t, k,zzzz, etc.) by November Following the reading of a story at Jane’s independent level, she will orally retell the story to a peer buddy. Jenna must identify the setting and at least two characters who were in the story. 3.Rodger will identify sight words weekly after receiving teacher instruction and participating in related word study activities on a daily basis. 4.When given a probe sheet with words beginning with bl, cl, and fl consonant blends, Michael will see-say the words at a rate of 60 words per minute with two or fewer errors.

41 41 Measurable Goals Just Checking Activity 5.Given an opportunities to ask a question or make a comment, David will wait to be acknowledged with 100 % accuracy on 3 consecutive sets of opportunities as measured on a weekly checklist. 6.Given a calculator; a pencil; and a set of word problem, the teacher will explain and demonstrate a strategy for solving them, including all for steps each time. 7.Given a story at the 3 rd grade level, the student will read silently with 90% comprehension. 8.At the end of the weekly spelling lesson, Jackie will correctly spell 5 of 10 single syllable words featuring the long a sound with 100% accuracy.

42 42 Step 5 Assess and Report Progress Consider: How does the student demonstrate what they know and is able to do? How does the teacher evaluate student progress? Are a variety of assessments used to measure progress? How will progress be reported to parents?

43 43 Step 6 Identify Specially Designed Instruction and Supplementary Aids and Services Available to all students who need them. Designed to provide meaningful educational benefit. Provided in a manner that avoids stigmatizing students Enable students to access the general education curriculum

44 44 Meet David… Completing his 7 th grade year ( 12 years old) IEP Written for 8 th grade year

45 45 Application Activity: The Six Step Process for Writing Measurable Annual Goals Review handout, “David’s Present Levels of Academic Achievement” Underline his needs

46 46 General Observations: David’s PLAAFP Are they… Connected to standards? Descriptive? Include strengths, needs, and input from teachers?

47 General Observations: David’s PLAAFP Which data types are included in the PLAAFP? List examples of data types included in the PLAAFP Summarize the interpretations of the data and tell how it would impact David’s instruction Identify David’s instructional level Are there areas where David’s achievement are at grade? Where?

48 48 Prep for the IEP B ring all data R esources: Standards I ndividualize! D escribe SDI that works G rade level requirements E nter your suggested measurable goals

49 49 Prioritizing Needs for David KEY QUESTIONS TO ASK… What prerequisite skills/knowledge does David need to close the gap between his present levels of academic achievement and the grade-level standards?

50 50 Program Modifications and Specially Designed Instruction Standards (Big Ideas, Concepts, and/or Competencies from the Standards Aligned System): The WHAT of education for all students Specially Designed Instruction (SDI): The HOW of education for students with disabilities

51 51 Program Modifications and Specially Designed Instruction SDI is based on identified student needs. SDI connects to the goal, which comes from needs identified in present levels, which comes from assessment.

52 52 The “What” of SDI May involve any aspect of the student’s instruction, including materials, techniques, assessments, and activities. May proceed to modifications of content, but only after modifying the instruction. Must consider the regular education curriculum first, then modifications to the regular education curriculum, and only then can specially designed instruction involve a special course.

53 53 Anywhere inside or outside the school, as stipulated in the IEP. Implemented in any classroom. Implemented by all teachers, although a special education teacher directs it. Where is SDI Implemented?

54 54 SDI for Assessment and Instruction  Assessment accommodations on IEP should be those used routinely by the student. “Directions for all assignments and assessments may be read aloud or clarified”. “Additional spacing provided for writing on worksheets and assessments.” “Use of word processor for tasks requiring written responses more than 2 sentences in length. Spell checker/grammar disabled for writing assessments. ” “Use of highlighter, graphic organizers for reading assignments in all classes.” “Allow highlighting, marking answers on the actual test form.”

55 55 SDI Considerations - IEPs Does the SDI item relate directly to assessment information on the student? Can another adult read the SDI item and have a reasonable idea of what to do with the student? Does the SDI item include “brand names?” Does the SDI item define “who” is going to implement it, and how often a day or week it will be implemented? Is it possible to measure the effectiveness of the SDI item? Is “As needed” or “Requested by student” used?

56 56 Small Group Work 1. Work with a partner 2. Develop at least 3 SDI for David 3. Remember to refer to David’s “Present Levels” and “Goal” 4. Share with other diads at your table 5. Be prepared to share one with whole group

57 57 Applying Progress Monitoring - David Read the following list. Write one example of what could be collected to monitor and measure David’s progress for reading. Summative: ______________________________ Formative: _______________________________ Diagnostic: ______________________________ Benchmark:______________________________

58 58 Sample of David’s Reading Progress Every 9 weeks parents will receive a report of Reading goals measured by  Weekly probes in specific skills graphed  Accuracy graphed on related classroom worksheets/quizzes and tests  4Sight Reading Benchmark in Nov. Jan. and April  PSSA Reading April (parent report over summer)

59 59 Graph on Inference Progress

60 60 Sample of David’s Math Progress Every 9 weeks parents will receive a report of math goals measured by  Biweekly probes in math specific skills graphed  4Sight Math Benchmark in Nov. Jan. and April  PSSA Reading April (parent report over summer)

61 61 David’s Year at a Glance in Math Language

62 62 Sample of David’s Writing Progress Every 9 weeks parents will receive a report of Writing goals measured by  Bi-weekly writing prompts – Correct Word Sequence graphed – formative assessment  Self and/or teacher analysis of use of style on writing prompts every two weeks  PSSA Writing (parent report over summer) – summative assessment

63 63 Correct Word Sequence - Graph 9/1 9/14 10/1 10/14 11/2 11/16

64 Practice Activity 1. Individually read the IEP provided and complete the IEP Review Activity worksheet 2. Discuss your findings from the IEP Review Activity with the colleagues at your table. Select a facilitator, time keeper, and recorder Each person should be prepared to share the group’s responses to each section 3. Whole group reporting

65 Assignment for October 3  Select 4 IEPs  Review the 4 IEPs selected looking for trends (prunes and plums) in data collection, PLAAFPs, goals, and SDI  Summarize the trends found in the 4 IEPs selected for review  Based on these trends, what would be the next steps for… You Teacher/s Building Administrator


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