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Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education Classroom and Behavior Management 1.

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1 Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education Classroom and Behavior Management 1

2 2 Effective Classroom Management Behavior management Teaching routines Ratio of 6-8 positive to 1 negative adult- student interaction Instructional management Curriculum & instructional design Environmental management Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

3 3 Nonclassroom Systems Teaching expectations & routines Active supervision Scan, move, interact Precorrections & reminders Positive reinforcement Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

4 4 Individual Student System Behavioral competence Function-based behavior support planning Comprehensive person-centered planning & wraparound processes Targeted social skills instruction Self-management Individualized instructional & curricular accommodations Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

5 5 Creating Positive School Climates: Some Features Create continuum of behavior supports from a systems perspective Focus on behavior of adults in school as unit Establish behavioral competence Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

6 6 Antecedents Classroom Teacher Manager Prevention Procedures, Routines, and Rules Instructional Strategies, Activities, and Management Physical Environment Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

7 7 Areas To Be Observed in the Classroom Classroom Arrangement Efficient Time Management Smooth Transitions Clear Expectations Active Supervision Consequences for Positive and Negative Behaviors Clear learning goals communication through visual or auditory means. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

8 8 Classroom Arrangement Seating arrangement for visibility of all students at all times Smooth student movement in the room Accessible equipment/books Instructional displays within eyesight of the students Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

9 9 Proactive (Antecedent) Strategies Structure the Physical Space Seating arrangements Examples? Use Proximity Control Anticipate problems The “wandering reinforcer” Examples? Motivation and Encouragement Tell them what you want, what will happen, and give them immediate positive feedback when you get it Examples? Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

10 10 Physical Environment Public/Private Space Arrangement of furniture Movement in the classroom Visual lines Storage Aesthetics Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

11 11 Time Management and Smooth Transitions Minimize time spent on organization and transitions Spend less time on taking roll, students standing in line, time between one activity and the next Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

12 12 Procedures, Routines, and Rules Effective Teachers Teach Procedures Using the washroom Fire and Disaster Drills Leaving the building Heading on the paper Collecting papers Bell assignments Sharpening pencils Movement in the class Answering questions Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

13 13 What variables need to be considered in Organizing the Classroom? Technology (Powerpoint, computers as tools) Discussion (Small group vs. Large) Hands On Experience Partnering Seatwork Peer Tutoring Lecture Video/Film “Grouping” Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

14 14 Proactive (Antecedent) Strategies Increase Academic Engaged (Learning) Time Three basic components: the percentage of the day scheduled for academics (should be at least 70%) on-task time of the student (should be at least 85%) success of the student when academically engaged (should be at least 80%) Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

15 15 Clear expectations established and visible in the classroom Components of the school-wide PBS plan Use of Pre-correction Antecedent intervention that aims to reduce predictable problem behaviors and increase appropriate replacement behaviors through the daily review of setting specific rules prior to being released into that setting or beginning a new activity. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

16 16 Classroom Management How can this be accomplished? (Prevention?) Using appropriate instructional strategies. Deciding whether to group students based on ability or other special characteristic. Being invested in your own job (e.g., “You have to like them.” Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

17 17 Proactive (Antecedent) Strategies Characteristics of Good Classroom Rules: Keep them to a minimum Keep the wording simple Represent basic expectations Keep the wording positive Make rules specific Make them observable & measurable Post the rules in a public place Tie rules to consequences Always include a compliance rule Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

18 18 Classroom Rules Designed to catch children misbehaving in order to issue punishments or Guidelines that assist children in examining their behavior and how it affects themselves and others Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

19 19 Developing Classroom Behavior Standards Key Factors: 1.Involve students in process 2.State rules clearly, avoid generalities 3.Limit number of standards 4.Gain acceptance from the children 5.Monitor student behavior 6.Communicate Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

20 20 Developing Standards for Behavior Discussing the Value of Rules Developing a List Getting a Commitment Monitoring and Reviewing Rules Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

21 21 Developing Standards for Behavior Monitor and Review Classroom Rules Regular review of rules Individual meetings with students New Student Meetings Activities to Review Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

22 22 Instructional Management Skills That Facilitate On-task Behavior Giving clear instruction Beginning a lesson Maintaining attention Pacing Using seatwork effectively Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

23 23 Instructional Management Skills That Facilitate On-Task Behavior Summarizing Providing useful feedback and evaluation Making smooth transitions Dealing with common frustrations Planning for early childhood settings Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

24 24 Proactive (Antecedent) Strategies Hype Make a big deal out of desired behaviors and anticipated reinforcers Pre-correction Strategies Anticipate problem situations and provide instructions for behavior; link to anticipated reinforcers and reward immediately Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

25 25 Active Supervision Scanning – examining the area for rule followers and rule violators Moving – consistently traveling around the room where problems are more likely to occur Interacting – initiating brief prosocial interactions with students (e.g., brief praise) Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

26 26 Classroom Management Factors for grouping: Consider the “Good” and “Bad” aspects Should be based on purpose of the lesson Members of “lowest” group need special attention Teachers need to be “managers” of groups Consider time factors, explicitly stated rules, & the size of group Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

27 27 Teachers often dilute the effectiveness of their instructions by: presenting instructions as questions or polite requests. Commands have less impact when stated as questions or requests, because the student may believe that he or she has the option to decline. The teacher who attempts, for example, to quiet a talkative student by saying, "Tanya, could you mind keeping your voice down so that other students can study?" should not be surprised if the student replies, "No, thank you. I would prefer to talk!" stating instructions in vague terms. A student may ignore a command such as "Get your work done!" because it does not state specifically what behaviors the teacher expects of the student. following up instructions with excessive justifications or explanations. Because teachers want to be viewed as fair, they may offer long, drawn-out explanations for why they are requiring the class or an individual student to undertake or to stop a behavior. Unfortunately, students can quickly lose the thread the explanation and even forget the command that preceded it! Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

28 28 However, effective instructions can often increase the probability that student will comply by 50% or greater. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

29 29 Effective Instructions  are brief. Students can process only so much information. Students tend to comply best with brief commands because they are easy to understand and hard to misinterpret.  are delivered one task or objective at a time. When a command contains multi-step directions, students can mishear, misinterpret, or forget key steps. A student who appears to be noncompliant may simply be confused about which step in a multi-step directive to do first!  are given in a matter-of-fact, businesslike tone. Students may feel coerced when given a command in an authoritarian, sarcastic, or angry tone of voice. For that reason alone, they may resist the teacher's directive. Teachers will often see greater student compliance simply by giving commands in a neutral or positive manner.

30 30 Effective Instructions  are stated as directives rather than questions. Perhaps to be polite, teachers may phrase commands as questions (e.g., "Could we all take out our math books now?"). A danger in using 'question-commands' is that the student may believe that he or she has the option to decline! Teachers should state commands as directives, saving questions for those situations in which the student exercises true choice.  avoid long explanations or justifications. When teachers deliver commands and then tack lengthy explanations onto them, they diminish the force of the directive. If the teacher believes that students should know why they are being told to do something, a brief explanation should be delivered prior to the command.  give the student a reasonable amount of time to comply. Once the teacher has given a command, he or she should give the student a reasonable time span (e.g., 5- 15 seconds) to comply. During that waiting period, the teacher should resist the temptation to nag the student, elaborate on the request, or other wise distract the student. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

31 31 Basic Premise Resistance and poor motivation are not student characteristics, they are student cognitions and behaviors and are subject to interpersonal influence. Teachers can (and do) drive resistance levels up and down dramatically by the behavioral responses they choose in the face of resistance and apathy. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

32 32 Essential Elements Matrix: Tier 1 Essential Element 13 Follow-up procedures in place for instructional staff who have not met minimal instructional and behavioral criteria Follow-up procedures that include feedback to instructional staff members that include the following: a scheduled conference, written information about problematic key features of the checklist, a plan for improvement, and follow-up teacher observations demonstrating implementation. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

33 33 Essential Elements Matrix: Tier 1 Essential Element 9 System of Behavioral Support (school and district level) School-wide behavior support plan that addresses the elements of positive behavior support Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

34 34 3 TIERS Tier 1: Quality Classroom Instruction Tier 2: Focused Supplemental Instruction Tier 3: Intensive interventions specifically designed to meet the individual needs of students You’ve seen this before for Academics… It’s the same for BEHAVIOR. What are teachers doing for ALL students to provide quality instruction for behaviors? Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

35 35 Example (part 1) Student A: Beginning of Third grade Teacher reviewing second grade skills Student A can’t quite get it right and therefore does not complete work Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

36 36 Example (part 1) Teacher says, “Ok A, let’s review this.” Proceeds to review the skill with the student and then provides practice activities to observe mastery of skills Student A: Beginning of Third grade Teacher reviewing second grade skills Student A can’t quite get it right and therefore does not complete work Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

37 37 Example (part 1) Student A: Beginning of Third grade Teacher reviewing second grade skills Student A can’t quite get it right and therefore does not complete work Teacher says, “Why aren’t you doing what I told you to do? We’ve reviewed this already. You should follow directions.” OR Teacher says, “Ok A, let’s review this.” Proceeds to review the skill with the student and then provides practice activities to observe mastery of skills Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

38 38 Example (part 2) Student A: Beginning of Third grade Teacher reviewing classroom rules and expectations Student A can’t quite get it right and continually forgets to raise his hand before speaking and blurts out loudly Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

39 39 Example (part 2) Teacher says, “Ok A, let’s review this.” Proceeds to review the skill with the student and then provides practice activities to observe mastery of skills Student A: Beginning of Third grade Teacher reviewing classroom rules and expectations Student A can’t quite get it right and continually forgets to raise his hand before speaking and blurts out loudly Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

40 40 Example (part 2) Teacher says, “Why aren’t you doing what I told you to do? We’ve reviewed this already. You should follow directions.” OR Teacher says, “Ok A, let’s review this.” Proceeds to review the skill with the student and then provides practice activities to observe mastery of skills Student A: Beginning of Third grade Teacher reviewing classroom rules and expectations Student A can’t quite get it right and continually forgets to raise his hand before speaking and blurts out loudly Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

41 41 Tier 1: Academic Do we recognize that we have many students who do not have enriched environments with language and help from home with homework and other academic tasks? YES For some of these students, we realize that additional work must be done to teach these skills. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

42 42 Tier 1: Behavior Do we recognize that we have many students who do not have enriched environments with social skills and help from home with behavioral difficulties? YES For some of these students, we realize that additional work must be done to teach the appropriate skill. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

43 43 What Are We Doing Now For Behavior? Where is TIER 1? What instruction for behaviors are we providing to ALL students? Are we teaching appropriate behaviors and HOW are we teaching them? Not reviewing rules a few times and then providing consequences when they are not followed ALSO, does demonstration of mastery one time means that the skill will be used 100% of the time and no longer needs practice? Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

44 44 TIER 1 for Behavior is Positive Behavior Supports (also called Positive Behavior Intervention & Supports) What does it look like and how is it done? Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

45 45 What is Tier 1 for behavior (PBIS)? PBIS is a broad range of systemic and individualized strategies for achieving important social and learning outcomes while preventing problem behavior with all students. (Sugai, 2004) Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

46 46 PBIS is… Not specific practices or curriculum…it’s a general approach to preventing problem behavior Not limited to any particular group of students…it’s for all students Not new…it’s based on a long history of behavioral practices and effective instructional design and strategies (Sugai, 2004) Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

47 47 PBIS addresses: High rates of problem behavior Ineffective and punitive discipline procedures Lack of staff support and cohesion Negative school climate High use of crisis/reactive management procedures Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

48 48 Messages! 1. Successful Individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or schools that are effective, efficient, relevant, & durable 2. Learning & teaching environments must be redesigned to increase the likelihood of behavioral & academic success (Sugai, 2004) Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

49 49 Main Message! School environments that are positive, preventive, predictable, & effective Are safer, healthier, & more caring Have enhanced learning & teaching outcomes Can provide a continuum of behavior support for all students Are achievable & sustainable (Sugai, 2004) Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

50 50 Nonclassroom Setting Systems Classroom Setting Systems Individual Student Systems School-wide Systems School-wide Positive Behavior Support Systems Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

51 51 What Is Our “Common” Response? Clamp down on rule violators. Review rules & sanctions. Extend continuum of aversive consequences. Improve consistency of use of punishments. Establish “bottom line.” Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

52 52 A Real Life Common Classroom Example... Child starts the day with a green light For every infraction, light is moved from green to yellow to red Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

53 53 What does PBIS look like? > 80% of students can tell you what is expected of them and give behavioral example because they have been taught, actively supervised, practiced, and acknowledged Positive adult to student interactions exceed negative Data and team based action planning and implementation are operating Full continuum of behavior support is available to all students (Sugai, 2004) Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

54 54 ≈ 15% ≈ 5% CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At- Risk Behavior ≈ 80% of Students Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

55 55

56 56 School-wide & Classroom Systems 1.Common purpose & approach to discipline 2.Clear set of positive expectations & behaviors 3. Procedures for teaching expected behavior 4. Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior 5. Continuum of procedures for discouraging inappropriate behavior 6. Procedures for on-going monitoring & evaluation Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

57 57 Define Behavioral Expectations Develop 3-5 inclusive, positively stated expectations Easy to remember Apply to all students in all settings Define what each expectation means (behaviorally) in each relevant school environment Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

58 58 School Rules NO Food NO Weapons NO Backpacks NO Drugs/Smoking NO Bullying Redesign Learning & Teaching Environment

59 59 Teach Behavioral Expectations Directly teach concrete social skills expected in each relevant school environment Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

60 60 Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

61 61 Acknowledge/reward Appropriate Behavior Appropriate behavior needs to be beneficial to the student Some use formal systems; Some rely on social reinforcers (e.g., Praise, recognition, privileges) All students should be acknowledged Goal: 4-5 positives for every aversive Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

62 62 Monitor and Correct Behavioral Errors Clear set of consequences for problem behavior Correct problem behavior quickly Tie correction to the school expectations (what to do instead next time) Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

63 63 Use Information for Decision-making Collect data on office referrals that require administrative involvement Provides useful information for refining school-wide discipline system Provides objective evaluation of success Provides positive feedback to students, staff, administration, and families

64 64 Benefits of a good Tier 1 Fewer students in Tier 2 with individual interventions. Teachers spending less time correcting minor offenses that may or may not lead to an office referral!!! Resulting in more instruction time! More positive school environment Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

65 65 “I like workin’ at school.” After implementing PBS, a Principal in Connecticut reports that teacher absences dropped from 414 (2002- 2003) to 263 (2003-2004).

66 66 “I like it here.” Over the past 3 years, 0 teacher requests for transfers Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

67 67 GROUP COST BENEFIT: Administrators Office Referral Reduction across several schools using PBS = 2000 If one referral = 15 minutes of administrator time, then 2000x15 = 30,000 minutes 500 hours or 71 seven-hour school days of administrator time recovered and reinvested. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

68 68 GROUP COST BENEFIT: Instruction Office Referral Reduction across a district using PBS = 2000 If students miss approximately 30 minutes of instruction for each office referral then 2000x30 = 60,000 minutes 1000 hours or 142 seven-hour school days of instruction time recovered!!! Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

69 69 What could a reduction of ISS and OSS mean? Let’s just say… One school has 75 referrals resulting in ISS and 25 resulting in OSS ODR (for each referral) = 30 minutes ISS = 2 days of no instruction (some kids get 1 day, some may get 3) OSS = 3 days of no instruction (some getting anywhere from 1-9 days) 216 minutes of instruction per day Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

70 70 What could a reduction of ISS and OSS mean? Current loss of instruction 51,600 minutes 860 hours 123 7-hour school days If we could just reduce the number of referrals that result in either ISS or OSS by 1/3 we could save approximately 41 days of instruction! Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

71 71 What if the teacher doesn’t send the student to the office? Let’s just say…Teacher A corrects his/her students approximately 20 times per day Spends approximately 30 seconds per correction. 20x30 = 600 seconds = 10 minutes per day 10 minutes x 180 days = 1800 minutes of lost instruction time!!! Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

72 72 “We found some minutes?” After reducing their office discipline referrals from 400 to 100, middle school students requiring individualized, specialized behavior intervention plans decreased from 35 to 6. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

73 73 “She can read!” With minutes reclaimed from improvements in proactive PBS discipline, elementary school invests in improving school-wide literacy. Result: >85% of students in 3 rd grade are reading at/above grade level. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

74 74 Questions so far??? Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

75 75 Example PBIS Proposal Example School District Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

76 76 Step 1: Define 3-5 Positively Stated Expectations Example 1 Respectful Responsible Safe Example 2 Be Respectful of Self, Other, and Property Be Responsible and Prepared at all Times Be Ready to follow directions and procedures Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

77 77 SETTING All SettingsHallwaysPlaygroundsCafeteria Library/ Computer Lab AssemblyBus Respect Ourselves Be on task. Give your best effort. Be prepared. Walk.Have a plan. Eat all your food. Select healthy foods. Study, read, compute. Sit in one spot. Watch for your stop. Respect Others Be kind. Hands/feet to self. Help/share with others. Use normal voice volume. Walk to right. Play safe. Include others. Share equipment. Practice good table manners Whisper. Return books. Listen/watch. Use appropriate applause. Use a quiet voice. Stay in your seat. Respect Property Recycle. Clean up after self. Pick up litter. Maintain physical space. Use equipment properly. Put litter in garbage can. Replace trays & utensils. Clean up eating area. Push in chairs. Treat books carefully. Pick up. Treat chairs appropriately. Wipe your feet. Sit appropriately. TEACHING MATRIX Expectations

78 78 Respectful ClassroomHallwayCafeteriaPlayground 1. Follow directions first time given. 1. Follow directions. 1. Take turns. 2. Use inside voice. 2. Eat your own food. 2. Invite others to play. 3. Talk only with permission. 3. Use polite language. 3. Wait to be dismissed. 3. Put-ups not put- downs. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

79 79 Responsible ClassroomHallwayCafeteriaPlayground 1. Be prepared. 1. Stay in line with class. 1. Wait in line.1. Tell if someone is hurt. 2. Listen during lessons. 2. Watch where you are walking. 2. Clean up after yourself. 2. Get in line to go in when teacher says. 3. Do your work. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

80 80 Safe ClassroomHallwayCafeteriaPlayground 1. Keep hands and feet to self. 2. Sit in chair correctly. 2. Watch where you are walking. 2. Keep food on your tray. 2. Use equipment the right way. 3. Follow teacher instructions. 3. Walk. 3. Stay in area. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

81 81 P Perseverance Holding to a course of action despite obstacles Stay positive Set goals Learn from mistakes R Respect To show consideration, appreciation, and acceptance Respect yourself Respect others Demonstrate appropriate language and behavior I Integrity Adherence to an agreed upon code of behavior Be responsible Do your own work Be trustworthy and trust others D Discipline Managing ones self to achieve goals and meet expectations Strive for consistency Attend class daily; be on time Meet deadlines; do your homework E Excellence Being of finest or highest quality Do your personal best Exceed minimum expectations Inspire excellence in others Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

82 82

83 83 Create your own rules/expectations matrix Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

84 84 Step 2: Procedures for Teaching Expectations Pre-teaching skills DAILY Skill Review: first 15 minutes of the school day Design brief lessons to teach the rules by: Teaching the skill Providing examples and non-examples Conducting Activities: Role playing, modeling, performance feedback Teach in the moment! Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

85 85 Pre-Teaching Example Skill: Getting help (How to ask for assistance for difficult tasks) Example: If you don’t understand the directions of your assignment, raise your hand and wait for the teacher to call on you. Non-example: If you don’t understand the directions of your assignment, yell out to the teacher to come help you. Activities: 1. Ask 2-3 students to give an example of a time when they needed help. 2. Ask students to indicate or show how they can get help 3. Encourage and support appropriate discussion (PRAISE AND FEEDBACK!!) After the lesson: During the Day 1.Just before giving students difficult or new task, direction, or activity, ask them to tell you how they could get help if they have difficulty (Pre-teaching!) 2.When you see students having difficulty with a task (e.g., off-task, complaining) ask them to indicate that they need help (Reminder!) 3.Whenever a student gets help the correct way, provide specific PRAISE to the student. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

86 86 School-wide Response to Appropriate Behavior CARDS, DOLLARS or BUCKS, TOKENS, TICKETS For any instance of observed appropriate behavior anywhere in the school building, teacher delivers “Token”. Delivery: Be in proximity to student, praise for appropriate behavior (BE SPECIFIC) Put name on card, deliver to student. Praise again Reward: Could have a drawing per class or per grade Could use as “money” to buy rewards Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

87 87 Class-wide Response to Appropriate Behavior Fill up the jar! Each class will have 2 jars. For appropriate behavior, the class as a whole, and individuals will have the opportunity to fill the jar. When the jar is filled…everything stops…Class reward… Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

88 88 Fill Up The Jar: Logistics What to place in the jar? Marbles Beans How can they earn the opportunity to fill the jar? ANY instance of appropriate behavior (group or individual) What is the reward? Class votes Reinforcer Pool (Choose a few different ideas, write them down and put in a box. When the class earns the reinforcer, pick from the box) Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

89 89 Fill Up The Jar: Example Class walks in from recess quietly, and sits down at desks. Teacher: I love the way this class came in so quietly and sat in your chairs ready to learn! Let’s fill up the jar! (Place a marble, jelly bean, etc.) into the jar so the class can see. Teacher: Great job class! We are getting closer to filling up the jar and earning a reward! Excellent work! Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

90 90 Cougar Traits in the Community Student Name __________________________________ Displayed the Cougar Trait of: Respect Responsibility Caring Citizenship (Circle the trait you observed) Signature _____________________________________________ If you would like to write on the back the details of what you observed feel free! Thank you for supporting our youth. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

91 91 Acknowledge & Recognize

92 92 When? Daily! Students may only get to turn in the tokens every 9 weeks, but they are acknowledged daily for their appropriate behavior. Why reward students for things they should do anyway? Just because they “should” doesn’t mean they do or they have the appropriate skills. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

93 93 Why? Reinforcement – a stimulus that will increase the future probability of the behavior. Football players work for stars on their helmets Adults work for rewards and praise… They just don’t need it as frequently. Play video PBS 2.0 Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

94 94 What about the teachers? Apply principles to adult behavior! Regularly acknowledge staff behavior “G.O.O.S.E.” (Get Out Of School Early) Or “arrive late” Procedures Kids/staff nominate Kids/staff reward, then pick Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

95 95 Developing Habits The goal is for students to develop positive behavior habits. Some students will also have to get rid of bad habits. Simple habits can be developed in 14-21 days (e.g., remembering to wash hands). More difficult habits can take several months to a year before you get a final result, especially if a current habit must be replaced! Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

96 96

97 97 How do we Begin? Develop a School Leadership or PBS Team Complete a Needs Assessment Survey with Teachers Schedule Regular meetings with the Team to review progress and troubleshoot Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

98 98 How do we Begin? (cont.) Develop/Finalize School Expectations Get input from all staff Staff “Buy-In” Develop School Wide Response to Positive Behavior (e.g., Cards, Dollars, Tickets) Guidelines of Distribution Details of how student rewards are provided Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

99 99 How do we Begin? (cont.) Develop teaching strategies for expectations and provide to teachers Teacher Rewards Parent Involvement Budget Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

100 100 How do we Begin? (cont.) Review of data and use of data to make decisions!!!! Review with team and present to staff What data to review number of referrals per day and month, location, type, etc. Teachers’ and students’ perceptions Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

101 101 You have your rules/expectation matrix… Develop the following Team Members How to get staff buy-in School-Wide response to Positive Behavior and Guidelines for Distribution Teacher Rewards If you currently have a PBS plan in your district, is there an area that could be improved? Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

102 102 CRITICAL COMPONENT TREATMENT FIDELITY/INTEGRITY INTERVENTION OR POSITIVE BEHAVIOR PLAN MUST BE DONE!!! ALSO, IT MUST BE DONE IN THE MANNER IN WHICH IS WAS INTENDED What can happen if it is not done correctly? Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

103 103 The following slides include two schools that had high treatment integrity followed by one school that did not. Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

104 104 BaselineYear 1 BaselineYear 1

105 105 Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

106 106 BaselineYear 1

107 107

108 108 Preparation for the First Day of School or First Day of Implementation Posters of rules for every area in every school Materials (cards, tokens, bucks) for all staff members in each school Materials to Fill Up The Jar (if you choose to use it) Jars and Beans/Marbles for every class in every school Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education

109 109 QUESTIONS/COMMENTS? Copyright © 2008 Mississippi Department of Education


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