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Where would you go… …if your country was no longer safe?

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Presentation on theme: "Where would you go… …if your country was no longer safe?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Where would you go… …if your country was no longer safe?

2 What would you take… …if you had 5 minutes to leave home?

3 When you leave, you grab your children and nothing else. We lost all our belongings Voice of a Bosnian refugee

4 Panic & confusion Fear Loss No where to go Anger Hope Sadness Flee for your lives

5 These are the thoughts of a refugee fleeing their country… No time for goodbyes, no time for mourning, no time for anything…just save your life and the lives of your children.

6 Its awful to leave your country. I left alone. You never know when you are able to go back again and visit family and friends, your job – everything – all of your memories of life is there, you have to leave everything. An Iranian refugee

7 The refugee journey… An unimaginable experience An unforgettable story A courageous journey

8 It takes courage to be a refugee…

9 There were an estimated 10.3 million refugees worldwide at the beginning of That means there is a new refugee every 21 seconds. UNHCR, 2004

10 Around 47% of persons under the United Nations Commission for Refugees are children under the age of % are under the age of five. UNHCR, 2005

11 Refugee women, especially widows, single mothers and the elderly are a particularly vulnerable population. An estimated 80% of refugees are women and children. UNHCR 2005

12 The occupational disruption, IMAGINE… The environmental destruction, And the psychosocial turmoil… …EXPERIENCED BY A REFUGEE

13 IMAGINE…

14 The war zone…. When it hits you, when somebody that you knew or someone your close to, or their family, or somebody had just died. Seeing that scene, that loss, its really unbearable. You understand war, and your forced to grow up sooner than most kids do. A yugoslavian refugee remembering the war

15 Homes destroyed. Environmental upheaval

16 Livelihoods lost Occupational disruption

17 A new makeshift home…a refugee camp I saw a lot of tents, people and crying. I always saw mean people in the army just looking. It was muddy, very, very sad. Words of a 13 year old Albanian refugee

18 There are very poor drainage and sanitation systems. At times standing water is several feet deep. Refugees International talking about the camps in Bangladesh in 2005 Poor living conditions

19 Living conditions in the camps are seriously overcrowded. Families of 8 or 10 eat, sleep, and work in eight by ten-foot square rooms. Refugee International

20 Food is scarce. Cooking utensils basic.

21 A lost childhood. No time for play. Only survival.

22 Loss of meaningful occupation… Living i The cave is difficult to live in. There is no water, no windows. We dont want anything but just want to work to be busy, to be able to buy our food, to send our children to school, and to buy them things. My son wants to study but because we have no money he has to spend the day collecting firewood. Refugee International, 2002

23 In refugee camps, the sheer desperation provokes people to use creativity, stretching their imagination to bring relief to the morbid atmosphere… …I remember some kids just playing, tryna have fun. We tried to make anything fun. Voice of a Bosnian refugee remembering growing up in a refugee camp Desperate for meaningful occupation…

24 After years of waiting in a refugee camp… Average time spent in a refugee camp was 9 years in This increased to 17 years in UN Committee for Refugees, 2004

25 At last, sanctuary. A new life to build. World Refugee Day, UNHCR, 2006 And a determination to start all over again in an unfamiliar land.

26 But, the refugee journey does not end on arrival to their host country…

27 They are again faced with a myriad of… OCCUPATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL and PSYCHOSOCIAL CHALLENGES

28 Language barriers Unfamiliar household items Unfamiliar education and government systems Unrecognised work credentials Mental health concerns Ongoing impact of trauma New cultural and social expectations Lost profession Economic constraints Unfamiliar leisure opportunities Lost loved ones

29 Occupational opportunities We know that adjustment and learning take place because people participate in meaningful activities. Reese, 2005

30 These meaningful activities are domestic, social, recreational, academic and vocational. They take place within the local community in homes, school, and the workplace.

31 Opportunities for learning do not occur if there is no sustained participation in rewarding activities. These opportunities need to be created; they do not occur by chance. Reese, 2005

32 It is neither wealth or splendor; but tranquility and occupation which give happiness. Thomas Jefferson

33 It takes courage, understanding and compassion… …To work with refugees Occupational therapists can make a difference

34 Photo credits to: Refugees International Sincere thanks to Refugees International for your generosity in sharing your valuable photographs. They are a wonderful tribute to the refugee population and inspire compassion and understanding in others. Thank you

35 Where would you go… …if your country was no longer safe?

36 What would you take… …if you had 5 minutes to leave home?

37 When you leave, you grab your children and nothing else. We lost all our belongings Voice of a Bosnian refugee

38 Panic & confusion Fear Loss No where to go Anger Hope Sadness Flee for your lives

39 These are the thoughts of a refugee fleeing their country… No time for goodbyes, no time for mourning, no time for anything…just save your life and the lives of your children.

40 Its awful to leave your country. I left alone. You never know when you are able to go back again and visit family and friends, your job – everything – all of your memories of life is there, you have to leave everything. An Iranian refugee

41 The refugee journey… An unimaginable experience An unforgettable story A courageous journey

42 It takes courage to be a refugee…

43 There were an estimated 10.3 million refugees worldwide at the beginning of That means there is a new refugee every 21 seconds. UNHCR, 2004

44 Around 47% of persons under the United Nations Commission for Refugees are children under the age of % are under the age of five. UNHCR, 2005

45 Refugee women, especially widows, single mothers and the elderly are a particularly vulnerable population. An estimated 80% of refugees are women and children. UNHCR 2005

46 The occupational disruption, IMAGINE… The environmental destruction, And the psychosocial turmoil… …EXPERIENCED BY A REFUGEE

47 IMAGINE…

48 The war zone…. When it hits you, when somebody that you knew or someone your close to, or their family, or somebody had just died. Seeing that scene, that loss, its really unbearable. You understand war, and your forced to grow up sooner than most kids do. A yugoslavian refugee remembering the war

49 Homes destroyed. Environmental upheaval

50 Livelihoods lost Occupational disruption

51 A new makeshift home…a refugee camp I saw a lot of tents, people and crying. I always saw mean people in the army just looking. It was muddy, very, very sad. Words of a 13 year old Albanian refugee

52 There are very poor drainage and sanitation systems. At times standing water is several feet deep. Refugees International talking about the camps in Bangladesh in 2005 Poor living conditions

53 Living conditions in the camps are seriously overcrowded. Families of 8 or 10 eat, sleep, and work in eight by ten-foot square rooms. Refugee International

54 Food is scarce. Cooking utensils basic.

55 A lost childhood. No time for play. Only survival.

56 Loss of meaningful occupation… Living i The cave is difficult to live in. There is no water, no windows. We dont want anything but just want to work to be busy, to be able to buy our food, to send our children to school, and to buy them things. My son wants to study but because we have no money he has to spend the day collecting firewood. Refugee International, 2002

57 In refugee camps, the sheer desperation provokes people to use creativity, stretching their imagination to bring relief to the morbid atmosphere… …I remember some kids just playing, tryna have fun. We tried to make anything fun. Voice of a Bosnian refugee remembering growing up in a refugee camp Desperate for meaningful occupation…

58 After years of waiting in a refugee camp… Average time spent in a refugee camp was 9 years in This increased to 17 years in UN Committee for Refugees, 2004

59 At last, sanctuary. A new life to build. World Refugee Day, UNHCR, 2006 And a determination to start all over again in an unfamiliar land.

60 But, the refugee journey does not end on arrival to their host country…

61 They are again faced with a myriad of… OCCUPATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL and PSYCHOSOCIAL CHALLENGES

62 Language barriers Unfamiliar household items Unfamiliar education and government systems Unrecognised work credentials Mental health concerns Ongoing impact of trauma New cultural and social expectations Lost profession Economic constraints Unfamiliar leisure opportunities Lost loved ones

63 Occupational opportunities We know that adjustment and learning take place because people participate in meaningful activities. Reese, 2005

64 These meaningful activities are domestic, social, recreational, academic and vocational. They take place within the local community in homes, school, and the workplace.

65 Opportunities for learning do not occur if there is no sustained participation in rewarding activities. These opportunities need to be created; they do not occur by chance. Reese, 2005

66 It is neither wealth or splendor; but tranquility and occupation which give happiness. Thomas Jefferson

67 It takes courage, understanding and compassion… …To work with refugees Occupational therapists can make a difference

68 Photo credits to: Refugees International Sincere thanks to Refugees International for your generosity in sharing your valuable photographs. They are a wonderful tribute to the refugee population and inspire compassion and understanding in others. Thank you

69 Where would you go… …if your country was no longer safe?

70 What would you take… …if you had 5 minutes to leave home?

71 When you leave, you grab your children and nothing else. We lost all our belongings Voice of a Bosnian refugee

72 Panic & confusion Fear Loss No where to go Anger Hope Sadness Flee for your lives

73 These are the thoughts of a refugee fleeing their country… No time for goodbyes, no time for mourning, no time for anything…just save your life and the lives of your children.

74 Its awful to leave your country. I left alone. You never know when you are able to go back again and visit family and friends, your job – everything – all of your memories of life is there, you have to leave everything. An Iranian refugee

75 The refugee journey… An unimaginable experience An unforgettable story A courageous journey

76 It takes courage to be a refugee…

77 There were an estimated 10.3 million refugees worldwide at the beginning of That means there is a new refugee every 21 seconds. UNHCR, 2004

78 Around 47% of persons under the United Nations Commission for Refugees are children under the age of % are under the age of five. UNHCR, 2005

79 Refugee women, especially widows, single mothers and the elderly are a particularly vulnerable population. An estimated 80% of refugees are women and children. UNHCR 2005

80 The occupational disruption, IMAGINE… The environmental destruction, And the psychosocial turmoil… …EXPERIENCED BY A REFUGEE

81 IMAGINE…

82 The war zone…. When it hits you, when somebody that you knew or someone your close to, or their family, or somebody had just died. Seeing that scene, that loss, its really unbearable. You understand war, and your forced to grow up sooner than most kids do. A yugoslavian refugee remembering the war

83 Homes destroyed. Environmental upheaval

84 Livelihoods lost Occupational disruption

85 A new makeshift home…a refugee camp I saw a lot of tents, people and crying. I always saw mean people in the army just looking. It was muddy, very, very sad. Words of a 13 year old Albanian refugee

86 There are very poor drainage and sanitation systems. At times standing water is several feet deep. Refugees International talking about the camps in Bangladesh in 2005 Poor living conditions

87 Living conditions in the camps are seriously overcrowded. Families of 8 or 10 eat, sleep, and work in eight by ten-foot square rooms. Refugee International

88 Food is scarce. Cooking utensils basic.

89 A lost childhood. No time for play. Only survival.

90 Loss of meaningful occupation… Living i The cave is difficult to live in. There is no water, no windows. We dont want anything but just want to work to be busy, to be able to buy our food, to send our children to school, and to buy them things. My son wants to study but because we have no money he has to spend the day collecting firewood. Refugee International, 2002

91 In refugee camps, the sheer desperation provokes people to use creativity, stretching their imagination to bring relief to the morbid atmosphere… …I remember some kids just playing, tryna have fun. We tried to make anything fun. Voice of a Bosnian refugee remembering growing up in a refugee camp Desperate for meaningful occupation…

92 After years of waiting in a refugee camp… Average time spent in a refugee camp was 9 years in This increased to 17 years in UN Committee for Refugees, 2004

93 At last, sanctuary. A new life to build. World Refugee Day, UNHCR, 2006 And a determination to start all over again in an unfamiliar land.

94 But, the refugee journey does not end on arrival to their host country…

95 They are again faced with a myriad of… OCCUPATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL and PSYCHOSOCIAL CHALLENGES

96 Language barriers Unfamiliar household items Unfamiliar education and government systems Unrecognised work credentials Mental health concerns Ongoing impact of trauma New cultural and social expectations Lost profession Economic constraints Unfamiliar leisure opportunities Lost loved ones

97 Occupational opportunities We know that adjustment and learning take place because people participate in meaningful activities. Reese, 2005

98 These meaningful activities are domestic, social, recreational, academic and vocational. They take place within the local community in homes, school, and the workplace.

99 Opportunities for learning do not occur if there is no sustained participation in rewarding activities. These opportunities need to be created; they do not occur by chance. Reese, 2005

100 It is neither wealth or splendor; but tranquility and occupation which give happiness. Thomas Jefferson

101 It takes courage, understanding and compassion… …To work with refugees Occupational therapists can make a difference

102 Photo credits to: Refugees International Sincere thanks to Refugees International for your generosity in sharing your valuable photographs. They are a wonderful tribute to the refugee population and inspire compassion and understanding in others. Thank you

103 Where would you go… …if your country was no longer safe?

104 What would you take… …if you had 5 minutes to leave home?

105 When you leave, you grab your children and nothing else. We lost all our belongings Voice of a Bosnian refugee

106 Panic & confusion Fear Loss No where to go Anger Hope Sadness Flee for your lives

107 These are the thoughts of a refugee fleeing their country… No time for goodbyes, no time for mourning, no time for anything…just save your life and the lives of your children.

108 Its awful to leave your country. I left alone. You never know when you are able to go back again and visit family and friends, your job – everything – all of your memories of life is there, you have to leave everything. An Iranian refugee

109 The refugee journey… An unimaginable experience An unforgettable story A courageous journey

110 It takes courage to be a refugee…

111 There were an estimated 10.3 million refugees worldwide at the beginning of That means there is a new refugee every 21 seconds. UNHCR, 2004

112 Around 47% of persons under the United Nations Commission for Refugees are children under the age of % are under the age of five. UNHCR, 2005

113 Refugee women, especially widows, single mothers and the elderly are a particularly vulnerable population. An estimated 80% of refugees are women and children. UNHCR 2005

114 The occupational disruption, IMAGINE… The environmental destruction, And the psychosocial turmoil… …EXPERIENCED BY A REFUGEE

115 IMAGINE…

116 The war zone…. When it hits you, when somebody that you knew or someone your close to, or their family, or somebody had just died. Seeing that scene, that loss, its really unbearable. You understand war, and your forced to grow up sooner than most kids do. A yugoslavian refugee remembering the war

117 Homes destroyed. Environmental upheaval

118 Livelihoods lost Occupational disruption

119 A new makeshift home…a refugee camp I saw a lot of tents, people and crying. I always saw mean people in the army just looking. It was muddy, very, very sad. Words of a 13 year old Albanian refugee

120 There are very poor drainage and sanitation systems. At times standing water is several feet deep. Refugees International talking about the camps in Bangladesh in 2005 Poor living conditions

121 Living conditions in the camps are seriously overcrowded. Families of 8 or 10 eat, sleep, and work in eight by ten-foot square rooms. Refugee International

122 Food is scarce. Cooking utensils basic.

123 A lost childhood. No time for play. Only survival.

124 Loss of meaningful occupation… Living i The cave is difficult to live in. There is no water, no windows. We dont want anything but just want to work to be busy, to be able to buy our food, to send our children to school, and to buy them things. My son wants to study but because we have no money he has to spend the day collecting firewood. Refugee International, 2002

125 In refugee camps, the sheer desperation provokes people to use creativity, stretching their imagination to bring relief to the morbid atmosphere… …I remember some kids just playing, tryna have fun. We tried to make anything fun. Voice of a Bosnian refugee remembering growing up in a refugee camp Desperate for meaningful occupation…

126 After years of waiting in a refugee camp… Average time spent in a refugee camp was 9 years in This increased to 17 years in UN Committee for Refugees, 2004

127 At last, sanctuary. A new life to build. World Refugee Day, UNHCR, 2006 And a determination to start all over again in an unfamiliar land.

128 But, the refugee journey does not end on arrival to their host country…

129 They are again faced with a myriad of… OCCUPATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL and PSYCHOSOCIAL CHALLENGES

130 Language barriers Unfamiliar household items Unfamiliar education and government systems Unrecognised work credentials Mental health concerns Ongoing impact of trauma New cultural and social expectations Lost profession Economic constraints Unfamiliar leisure opportunities Lost loved ones

131 Occupational opportunities We know that adjustment and learning take place because people participate in meaningful activities. Reese, 2005

132 These meaningful activities are domestic, social, recreational, academic and vocational. They take place within the local community in homes, school, and the workplace.

133 Opportunities for learning do not occur if there is no sustained participation in rewarding activities. These opportunities need to be created; they do not occur by chance. Reese, 2005

134 It is neither wealth or splendor; but tranquility and occupation which give happiness. Thomas Jefferson

135 It takes courage, understanding and compassion… …To work with refugees Occupational therapists can make a difference

136 Photo credits to: Refugees International Sincere thanks to Refugees International for your generosity in sharing your valuable photographs. They are a wonderful tribute to the refugee population and inspire compassion and understanding in others. Thank you


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