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Person-Centered Practices and Planning Planning. Presented by Presented by The Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) the Office of Intellectual.

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Presentation on theme: "Person-Centered Practices and Planning Planning. Presented by Presented by The Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) the Office of Intellectual."— Presentation transcript:

1 Person-Centered Practices and Planning Planning

2 Presented by Presented by The Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) the Office of Intellectual Disabilities (formerly OMR) and the Partnership for People with Disabilities With funding through the Systems Transformation Grant (STG) from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)

3 Today’s Agenda A.M. An overview of person-centered principles and a description of person-centered thinking skills Break Virginia’s Individual Support Plan and ProcessP.M. Lunch (12:00 – 1:15) The nuts and bolts of transition coordination under MFP

4 Welcome and Introductions

5 Virginia’s Principles of Person-Centered Practices Virginia’s Principles of Person-Centered Practices Virginia Person-Centered Planning Leadership Team Virginia Systems Transformation Grant Resource Team

6 We see a Virginia where individuals of all ages and abilities have the supports we need to enjoy the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness and the opportunity to have a good life. Principles of Person-Centered Practices

7 Having a good life means different things to different people. It includes joy and happiness, health and safety, hopes and dreams, meaningful activities, intimate relationships with family and friends, having a home, transportation, work, money (bank accounts), and the ability to contribute to family and community. Principles of Person-Centered Practices (continued)

8 We believe that a good life is best led by the voice of the individual and by following these person-centered principles. Principles of Person-Centered Practices (continued)

9 “I am listened to.” “I have a voice.” “I listen to others.” Listening Individual choices and descriptions of a good life are respected and followed. Principle 1

10 “I have friends and family that I see often.” “I am part of my community.” “I have found groups, organizations and social activities that interest me.” Community Relationships with families, friends, and people in the community are very important and at the center of planning. Principle 2

11 “I have choices.” “I am responsible for my choices.” “I am respected.” Self-direction Personal choice and control are supported. Principle 3

12 “I am able to contribute to family and community. “I learn new things.” “People are nice to me.” “I respect others.” “I am nice to others.” Talents and Gifts The experience, talents, and contributions of individuals, families, and communities are strengthened and supported. Principle 4

13 “I am responsible for my choices.” “I receive quality support.” Responsibility There is shared responsibility for supports and choices. Principle 5

14 Systems Transformation: looking through a different lens

15 System Centered vs. Person Centered System CenteredPerson Centered Focuses on deficits and labels Focuses on capacities, gifts, strengths, & dreams Plans usually include ‘placement’ in a program Plans support a rich and active community life based on the individual’s gifts & interests. Inflexible, offering a limited number of program options Flexible, finding new possibilities unique to each person

16 System Centered vs. Person Centered System CenteredPerson Centered Puts the professional in control Supports individuals in making decisions Distances people by emphasizing differences Brings people together by discovering common experience Budgets are structured to maintain invest- ments in programs, building and property Budgets structured to provide individualized packages to support people

17 Person-Centered Practices Description of Person- Centered Thinking Skills Seven Questions A tool for helping people find a new place to live

18 Important to/ Important for and finding the balance between them

19 Important to What makes a person happy, content, fulfilled People, pets daily routines and rituals, products and things, Interests and hobbies, places one likes to go

20 Important for What we need to stay healthy, safe and well health and safety things that others feel will contribute to being accepted or valued in the community

21 Finding the balance between important to and important for Finding the balance between important to and important for AND Asking: What else do we need to know or learn?

22 Determining Staff Responsibilities Core: responsibilities that have to be done in a certain way or there will be grave consequences Creativity and judgment: how to help someone satisfy what is important to him or her Not our paid responsibility

23 Matching Staff Matching Staff For each person, what are the: Supports wanted & needed Skills needed Personality character- istics (present/ absent) Shared interests (nice to have)

24 Communication Chart Communication Chart Learning, using, & recording communication What is happening _______ does We think it means We should

25 What’s working/ What’s not working Analyzes situations from various perspectives The individual, family member, staff member

26 4 + 1 Questions What have we tried? What have we learned? What are we pleased about? What are we concerned about? And then What should we try/do based on what we have learned?

27 Learning Log Helpful in situations where people are trying new things Looking at working/not working in specific situations Provides a way to grow plans and add to a living description May replace progress notes

28 Seven Questions Seven Questions that you should be able to answer for each person you support What is important to the person? What is important for the person? Is important for being addressed in the context of what is important to? Is there a good balance between important to and important for? What does the person want to learn; what else do we need to learn? If the person is to get the balance described and we are to learn: What needs to stay the same (be maintained or enhanced?) What needs to change? c The Learning Community for Person Centered Practices

29 Helping People Find a New Place to Live Developed by Peter Kinsella and adapted by Michael Smull and Amanda George

30 Helping People Find a New Place to Live cont’d Moving is done in partnership with an individual and his/her family It is important to know how, where and with whom a person wants to live It is helpful if a living description is already available. This may be in someone’s person centered plan.

31 Helping People Find a New Place to Live cont’d Structured brainstorming process Takes into consideration what’s important to/important for Moving should only happen if the person is moving to somewhere that more closely matches what s/he wants

32 On the Partnership’s Website services/whatisp-cp.htm On the Learning Community Website For More Information


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