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Main idea and supporting details Chapters 2 and 3.

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Presentation on theme: "Main idea and supporting details Chapters 2 and 3."— Presentation transcript:

1 main idea and supporting details Chapters 2 and 3

2 General Parts of a Paragraph 1.topic 2.controlling idea 3.supporting details 2

3 From the Author’s Perspective 1.author chooses a topic (one to three words) “friends” 2.author chooses what he wants to say about the topic ---> controlling point types of friends 3.author combines topic and controlling point into a statement ---> main idea (topic sentence) There are several different types of friends. 3

4 From the Author’s Perspective… 4. author supports his main idea ---> major supporting details (What are the different types of friends?) best friends social friends acquaintances 4

5 From the Author’s Perspective… 5. author explains (gives examples for) each major supporting detail ---> minor supporting details What does the author mean by: best friends - Friends with whom you share intimate details of your life; they know the “real” you. social friends - People with whom you spend time and have fun, but who only know the “fun” and “social” side of you. acquaintances - People with whom you associate because of a particular place—school, work, etc.— but not outside of that venue. 5

6 From the Author’s Perspective 6 There are several different types of friends. First, most people have at least one or two best friends. These are the type of friends with whom you share intimate details of your life; they know the “real” you. Next, there are so-called social friends. Social friends are people with whom you spend time and have fun, but who only know the “fun” and “social” side of you. Finally, there are acquaintances or people with whom you associate because of a particular place—school, work, etc.—but not outside of that venue.

7 From the Author’s Perspective 7 There are several different types of friends. First, most people have at least one or two best friends. These are the type of friends with whom you share intimate details of your life; they know the “real” you. Next, there are so-called social friends. Social friends are people with whom you spend time and have fun, but who only know the “fun” and “social” side of you. Finally, there are acquaintances or people with whom you associate because of a particular place—school, work, etc.—but not outside of that venue.

8 identifying the main idea and major supporting details 8

9 Signal Words – Main Idea A few causes A number of reasons Many steps Several kinds Several types/ways/effects of… A number (three, four, etc.) 9

10 From the Author’s Perspective 10 There are several different types of friends. First, most people have at least one or two best friends. These are the type of friends with whom you share intimate details of your life; they know the “real” you. Next, there are so-called social friends. Social friends are people with whom you spend time and have fun, but who only know the “fun” and “social” side of you. Finally, there are acquaintances or people with whom you associate because of a particular place—school, work, etc.—but not outside of that venue.

11 Transition Words – Major Supporting Details Transition words often introduce major supporting details first/second/third… next then also last finally 11

12 From the Author’s Perspective 12 There are several different types of friends. First, most people have at least one or two best friends. These are the type of friends with whom you share intimate details of your life; they know the “real” you. Next, there are so-called social friends. Social friends are people with whom you spend time and have fun, but who only know the “fun” and “social” side of you. Finally, there are acquaintances or people with whom you associate because of a particular place—school, work, etc.—but not outside of that venue.

13 Places to Find the Main Idea Topic sentences (which include the topic and the main idea) are often located at the beginning of a paragraph, usually in the first or second sentence. HOWEVER, topic sentences can be anywhere in a paragraph:  in the first sentence,  in the last sentence,  in the first and last sentence  in the middle (preceded by an introduction)  implied (not directly stated in the paragraph) 13

14 Places to Find the Main Idea Examples for Places of Main Ideas pgs

15 Strategies for Locating the Main Idea Look for signal words and transition words Find the topic and major supporting details; ask yourself what point the author is trying to make “Make Your Own Main Idea Strategy” 15

16 Make Your Own Main Idea Strategy Key Questions to ask: 1.What is the topic of the paragraph? repeated words/who or what paragraph is about 2.What is listed about the topic? (major supporting details) 3.What do the major details have in common?

17 Make Your Own Main Idea Strategy Use the answers to write your own Main Idea using this format: There are many several some a few a number (three, four…) ways to reasons for types of differences between similarities causes of effects of steps to TOPIC

18 Let’s Practice pg. 46; Activity 2.2 (in book) 18

19 The Main Idea Test Use “The Main Idea Test” to ensure you found the main idea of a paragraph 1.Turn the sentence into a question 2.If the question is answered by the major supporting details in the paragraph, you have found the main idea 19

20 Let’s Apply 20 There are several different types of friends. First, most people have at least one or two best friends. These are the type of friends with whom you share intimate details of your life; they know the “real” you. Next, there are so-called social friends. Social friends are people with whom you spend time and have fun, but who only know the “fun” and “social” side of you. Finally, there are acquaintances or people with whom you associate because of a particular place—school, work, etc.—but not outside of that venue. Question: What are the several types of friends? Answer: best friends, social friends, acquaintances

21 Let’s Practice pgs. 54 – 58; Activity

22 Outlines and Concept Maps An outline shows the relationships among the main idea, major supporting details, and minor supporting details of a paragraph or passage. A concept map also shows the relationship among the different parts BUT uses boxes, circles, lines, and other shapes 22

23 Outline I. Main idea A. Major Supporting Detail 1. Minor detail 2. Minor detail B. Major Supporting Detail 1. Minor detail 2. Minor detail C. Major Supporting Detail 1. Minor Detail 2. Minor Detail 23

24 Sample Outline I. There are several different types of friends. A. Best Friends 1. friends with whom you share intimate details of your life 2. they know the real you B. Social Friends 1. people to have fun with (parties, hang out…) 2. only know “fun” and “social” side of you C. Acquaintances 1. people with whom you associate due to school, work… 2. no contact outside of that venue 24

25 Concept Map Main Idea Major Supporting Detail Minor Detail Major Supporting Detail Minor Detail Major Supporting Detail Minor Detail 25

26 Sample Concept Map There are several different types of friends. Best Friends friends with whom you share intimate life details know the real you Social Friends people to have fun with only know “fun”, “social” side of you Acquaintances associate only at work/school no contact outside of work/school 26


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