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ACTIVITY WHEN TEACHING CHILDREN WITH A HEARING LOSS, IT HAS TO BE “ON THE SAME BASIS” AS CHILDREN WITH NO HEARING LOSS.

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Presentation on theme: "ACTIVITY WHEN TEACHING CHILDREN WITH A HEARING LOSS, IT HAS TO BE “ON THE SAME BASIS” AS CHILDREN WITH NO HEARING LOSS."— Presentation transcript:

1 ACTIVITY WHEN TEACHING CHILDREN WITH A HEARING LOSS, IT HAS TO BE “ON THE SAME BASIS” AS CHILDREN WITH NO HEARING LOSS

2 WHAT IS HEARING LOSS? There is no scientific definition of hearing loss and what causes it.

3 Degrees of Hearing Loss
Mild Hearing Loss – where they will experience difficulty in hearing, soft speech, or hearing in background noise, meaning in a quiet hearing environment the hearing loss will be manageable. Moderate Hearing Loss – they have difficulty hearing conversations especially while background is evident. Appliances may need to be turned to higher levels to be heard clearly. Moderate-severe Hearing Loss – there is a reduction in clarity of speech. Severe Hearing Loss – they are unable to hear a conversation even if it is loud, it maybe difficult to decipher. It is difficult to interpret, even is if is shouted or amplified towards them. Profound Hearing Loss – will have difficulty even if sound is amplified in hearing and understanding. Sensorineural Hearing Loss- it is not just the lost of hearing but it is the clarity. While conductive hearing loss is not just the loss of loudness and is a temporary blockage of soundwave transition. Kotara Hearing Loss Centre (2010) (brochure) retrieved 18th March 2010.

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7 WHAT DIFFICULTIES MAY CHILDREN EXPERIENCE WHEN THEY HAVE A LOSS OF HEARING?

8 Communication can affect many aspects for anyone whom has a hearing impairment.
Hearing and Learning: A guide for helping children By Donna S. Wayner

9 Social/Behavioural Children whom have a hearing loss;
May have communication difficulties that will often lead to social isolation, poor self-concept and may withdraw themselves from social interaction. It is more likely that social problems will appear with children that have mild/moderate hearing loss than in those with a severe or profound. The social deficit experienced by children may cause behavioural problems. Challenging behaviour in children experiencing hearing loss may be expressing; anger, frustration or may indicate a learning difficulty. Under a broad spectrum of behaviour these student’s may show self injury, violence towards others, damage to property, mood disorders, age-related difficulties and drug and alcohol misuse. Students with hearing impairment may not understand what behaviour is acceptable. Research has shown that’s students with hearing loss tire easily because listening is hard work and are distracted easily due to this. Withdrawing from social interaction as communication difficulties often to lead to social isolation and poor self-concept. (ASLHA)

10 Education of Queensland
Be aware that deaf/hearing impaired students may have a different concept of personal space and may stand much closer to other people than students with normal hearing do. Discuss this with all students so that the class in general learns to be more aware of this issue. Encourage deaf/hearing impaired students not to encroach on the personal space of others. This issue is particularly important for secondary aged students. (Education Queensland)

11 Communication There can be a delay in development of speech and language. This deficit can result in learning difficulties and reduce academic outcomes/achievement. (ASHA) Vocabulary develops more slowly in children who have hearing loss. (ASHA) The gap between children with no hearing loss and those with hearing loss widens with age. Children with hearing loss do not catch up without intervention. (ASHA) Children with hearing impairments often have difficult understanding words with multiple meanings (semantics), example - bank. They also have difficult with function words such as an, are, a and the. (ASHA)

12 Communication (cont) Children with hearing loss often cannot hear word endings such as –s or –ed. This may lead to misunderstandings. (ASHA) Quiet speech sounds such as “s”, “sh”, “f’, “t” and “k” may not be heard and therefore they may not include them in there speech and therefore they may be misunderstood. (ASHA)

13 Cognitive/Intellectual
Children whom have a hearing loss; Lack of access to language and through social isolation, cognitive and psychosocial development can be effected due to profound deafness. Are often behind in terms of vocabulary and language comprehension. Students have difficulty with abstract concepts. Sign language should be developed with the acknowledgement of the hearing world and a solid foundation of language thus cognitive development is needed. Crucial issue is the students attain a fully developed language.

14 Literacy/Numeracy Children whom have a hearing loss;
Comprehend and produce shorter and simpler sentences than children with no hearing difficulty. Have difficulty in vocabulary, long words and comprehension. May have difficulty in all areas of academic achievement, especially reading and mathematical concepts. Children with moderate/mild hearing loss, on average, achieve one to four grade levels lower than their peers with no hearing difficulties. Unless appropriate management occurs. Children with serve to profound hearing loss, usually achieve skills no higher than the third or fourth grade levels unless appropriate educational intervention occurs early. Complex sentences and high levels of reading and writing are considered difficult to interpret and understand for children with hearing impairments.

15 WHAT STRATEGIES COULD BE IMPLEMENTED TO AID CHILDREN WHO HAVE A HEARING IMPAIRMENT?

16 Strategies Meet Learning support group, parents and the student’s to discuss ideas and strategies they may have to help provide a quality learning environment. Tape the morning, mid morning and afternoon class room sessions that are near the student’s seat. Replay later at home and decipher what noises can be eliminated from the room. E.g. over head fan, clock, etc. Change seating to u-shape to maximise visibility of all students and teacher when they are talking.

17 Strategies cont. Have the student seated close to teacher and away from high traffic areas. When doing a spelling test, giving instructions or communicating with the class, make sure you have their attention and you are facing them. Use some of the student’s interests in lesson’s and group work, to help engage them in group work and in classroom participation.

18 Strategies cont. Have more group work in pairs or small groups, use more hands on activities. (Help the student to interact with less stress) Use talking tokens to encourage one person speaking at a time. Use facial expressions, gestures and body language to help convey messages. Use visual aids when teaching and place phonic charts around the room. Use lessons less likely to need listening skills for the end of the day. (cater to tiredness)

19 Strategies cont. Don’t talk while writing on the board and write procedures on the board. Observations in and outside the classroom student’s who may appear to be socially isolated. Discuss strategies at the LSP (learning support plan) meeting that could help with the student’s social needs. Regularly reassess and make necessary adjustments, keep communications up to date with LSP team to gain and impart knowledge and assess progress.

20 PHYSICAL TOOLS AND ACADEMIC RESOURCES.

21 Hearing and Learning: A guide for helping children. 2001. By Donna S
Hearing and Learning: A guide for helping children By Donna S. Wayner

22 Discreet Digital Hearing Aids

23 Physical Children whom have hearing loss; Aids
They maybe required to wear hearing aids to improve clarity and loudness. They may need a cochlear implant that process and transmit sounds. They may use a FM listening system where the teacher and students are connected. 2. Signs of hearing loss; A child may turn their ear towards the sound indicating they maybe experiencing loss. Wax build-up, ear infections may affect hearing temporarily. Slow responses to sudden sounds and directions. Fidgeting, outbursts, stress and frustration. Sometimes students with a hearing loss can be handled incorrectly, generally to communication problems, physical restraint, mechanical restraint and chemical restraint.

24 Parent Perception Some parents may perceive their children’s behavioural, learning and other problems as greater than the problems of more severely hearing impaired children, as perceived by their respective parents.

25 Helpful places to look for information
Hearing and Learning: A guide for helping children By Donna S. Wayner Deafness and challenging behaviour; the 360 degree perspective Edited by Sally Austen and Dave Jeffery. Australian Hearing Association. Hearing Centre’s. Hamilton South Public School.

26 THEREFORE AT ONE POINT, A STUDENT IN YOUR CLASSROOM WILL EXPERIENCE SOME FORM OF HEARING LOSS

27 Reference List American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) (2010) Effects of Hearing Loss on Development. retrieved 18th March URL:http://www.asha.org/public/hearing/disorders/effects.htm Department of Education and Training Queensland (2009) How do I modify the listening environment retrieved 14th March URL: https://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=37976 Department of Education and Training Queensland (2009) Positive Classroom Environment Retrieved 14th March URL:https://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=37972 Hear-it. (2009) Poor quality of life for children with minor hearing loss. retrieved 18th March URL:http://www.hear-it.org/page.dsp?page=3865 Keller, E. (2005) Strategies for Teaching Students with Hearing Impairments. Retrieved 18th March URL: Waldman, D & Rouch, J. (2005) Your Childs Hearing Loss: What Parents Need to Know. The Berkley Publishing Group. New York Widex (nd) Your Hearing Loss and Hearing Solutions retrieved 18th Match URL:


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