Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

CyberSafety Unraveled

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "CyberSafety Unraveled"— Presentation transcript:

1 CyberSafety Unraveled
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 CyberSafety Unraveled Please feel free to modify presentation to fit your needs. Let us know of any successful changes you make so that we may share them: CTAP Region IV Adrienne DeWolfe Jim Freese Linda Uhrenholt Before presentation, you could have MySpace PSA video playing <http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid= &pr=goog-sl> Presentation Co-developed by AT&T and CTAP Region IV Presented by Vanitha Chandrasekhar Images from Microsoft Design Gallery

2 CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Goals of Presentation To unravel the fear and hype surrounding the online lives of our cyber kids while also considering strategies to help ensure that our children have a safe, positive experience with technology.

3 How Do You Use the Internet?
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 How Do You Use the Internet? What Are Your Favorite Sites? Why? Let’s talk a minute about your online life -- how do you use the Internet? What are you favorite web sites ? And Why?

4 How Are Students Using the Internet?
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 How Are Students Using the Internet? community.webshots.com en.wikipedia.com These are sites from our informal survey of kids in Walnut Creek, Ohio, etc. Why the kids like those site tends to be very different then our information driven adult purpose -- they say they are interactive and fun. There is a disconnect between adult users and kid users and digital natives and immigrants. Some of the fear and hype arises in part because adults are used to using the web to “consume” information and the digital natives are now “producers” of information rather than simply consumers. According to the 2005 Pew Internet Study: Teen Content Creators and Consumers, 57% of all teens who go online create content for the internet: create a blog; create a personal webpage; create a webpage for school, a friend, or an organization; share original content they created themselves online; or remix content found online into a new creation.<http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Teens_Content_Creation.pdf> This new producer-driven Web 2.0 is sometimes referred to as the Read/Write/Web because increasingly it’s about empowering users to create content and upload it for the world to view or at least share their opinion of content. Whether it’s sharing a blog, your bookmarks, your review of an online article, or your latest video, it’s all about the power of Internet users to influence each other. We tend to react as if we could simply lock the gates on the school yard, we try to lock out or block out the online spaces and places they run into trouble. This doesn’t work. We all have some work to do to understand the online and digital lives of youth. And we must represent youth voice when talking about this issue.

5 CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Welcome to Their World You may want to share the MacArthur Digital Media and Learning Initiative video here to set the stage for the positives around students and their online lives. (2:34) This video was embedded with phone permission of Ben Stokes of the MacAruthur Foundation on October 3, 2007. The MacArthur Foundation launched its five-year, $50 million digital media and learning initiative in October 2006 to help determine how digital technologies are changing the way young people learn, play, socialize, and participate in civic life. Find the video under Library/News and Announcements, called, “Video: Are Kids Different Because of Digital Media?” Released October 19, 2006 Have participants define the closing title at the end of the move in the last slide dlife:1001 cul8tr Have them get out chat lingo bingo and play. MacArthur Foundation Movie: Are Kids Different Because of Digital Media?”

6 “Think Before You Post”
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Definition: Personal information identifies you, your location or your financial assets. Obvious: name, age, sex, picture, phone number, address Less obvious: hobbies, interests, school mascot, gaming identities Used for phishing scams Small details about yourself can provide clues toward divulging personal information. Remember by posting your picture it can be altered or broadcast in ways you might not be happy about! Definitions for spamming and phishing from NetSmartz <http://www.netsmartz.org/safety/definitions.htm>: Spam - Unwanted from someone you don't know. It is usually trying to sell you something. Phishing - An online scam that uses to "fish" for users' private information by imitating legitimate companies. People are lured into sharing user names, passwords, account information or credit-card numbers. The phishing usually contains a link to an illegitimate site. Scammers copy the look of a web site to set up a nearly identical page, one that appears to be part of that company's site. “Think Before You Post”

7 CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Unraveling the facts… Identity thieves are clever, posing as friends, relatives and banks, to get people to reveal personal information. Watch for https and URL posers like paypa1. Teens are just as likely as adults to become victims of identity theft -- when applying for a driver's license they may find one already has been issued using their name and SSN. According to the Federal Trade Commission one should not give out personal information on the phone, through the mail, or on the Internet unless you've initiated the contact or are sure you know who you're dealing with. Identity thieves are clever, and have posed as representatives of banks, Internet service providers (ISPs), and even government agencies to get people to reveal their Social Security number, mother's maiden name, account numbers, and other identifying information. Before you share any personal information, confirm that you are dealing with a legitimate organization.

8 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students:
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students: Do not share personal information such as your name, age, sex, picture, location/address, phone number, hobbies, interests, and Social Security/bank account numbers. Create nicknames that do not reflect your own name or anything personal. From the CTAPIV AT&T poster located at <http://www.ctap4.org/cybersafety/> Print To-Dos out and have students or faculty read them aloud at the appropriate times.

9 To-Dos (cont’d): Never respond to online
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos (cont’d): Never respond to online communication that is inappropriate or makes you feel uncomfortable. Never agree to meet in person someone you met online. Always talk with your parents or a responsible adult about your online activities. Threads

10 Definition: Cyberbullying is the use of
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Definition: Cyberbullying is the use of technology for harassment, impersonation, denigration, trickery, exclusion and stalking. Cyberbullies may use , chat rooms, discussion forums, instant messaging, text messaging or social networking sites. Resource descriptions: Under our student resources, Netsmartz offers EXCELLENT Real-Life Stories as video vignettes about cyberbullying. In, “You Can't Take It Back" (Part 2 of 3, 1 1/2 minute video), a teen regrets his participation on a web site created to rate others at his school. In "Cyberbullying: Broken Friendship" (Part 3 of 3, 1 minute, 40 second video), a friendship is broken when a teen gives her best friend's password to some other girls at school. Under Educator Resources is Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D., Executive Director
of the Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use. Her website has incredible resources on cyberbullying and other cybersafety issues <http://www.csriu.org/>

11 CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Unraveling the facts… “If I tell someone about bullying, it will just make it worse.” Research shows that bullying will stop when peers or adults get involved. Headline news provides opportunities for discussion and “teachable moments” Cyber Bullying is considered a form of harassment in most states (including CA) and can be punishable by law as a misdemeanor - and in some cases a felony - if there is a reasonable threat to a person’s personal safety. For more information on the law and establishing school “nexus,” see The Educator’s Guide to Cyberbullying (.pdf download) from
The Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use under our teacher resources. Research is sited from Bullying Myth and Facts on <www.bullying.org> The research says: -Bullying stops in less than 10 seconds, 57% of the time when peers intervene on behalf of the victim. -(Pepler et al., 1997) Under educators,
in Dealing with Online Bullies, a lesson plan from CyberSmartCurriculum.org, students reflect on the rewards of cyberspace and then consider bullying scenarios in which they examine their personal comfort levels. They learn to recognize such feelings and responsibly handle the unacceptable behavior of others. <http://www.cybersmartcurriculum.org/lesson_plans/68_04.asp>

12 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students:
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students: Don’t respond to or meet with a cyberbully. Save proof of the harassment like messages, screen shots, IM logs, blogs, etc. From the CTAPIV AT&T poster located at <http://www.ctap4.org/cybersafety/>

13 CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos (cont’d): Tell a trusted adult who can: File a complaint with the Internet Service Provider or send an to the host of the web site where the abuse was posted. Contact the cyberbully’s parents. Contact an attorney or file a small claims action. Threads

14 CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos (cont’d): If it involves another LBUSD student, contact the school administrator In all other cases, contact the local police department Threads

15 Definition: Piracy refers to the ownership
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Definition: Piracy refers to the ownership rights of materials, created, written, designed or expressed by individuals. Includes music, games, movies, photos, and writing Threads

16 File-sharing represents 60% of all US Internet traffic.
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Unraveling the facts… File-sharing represents 60% of all US Internet traffic. Illegally downloading or sharing intellectual property without the permission of the creator is a crime punishable by law. The report from the Federal Trade Commission: "Peer-to-Peer File- Sharing Technology: Consumer Protection and Competition Issues" can be downloaded at <http://www.ftc.gov/reports/p2p05/050623p2prpt.pdf> You can also read a summary of the report at <http://www.netfamilynews.org/nl html#1>

17 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students:
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students: Don’t download, copy, or share music, games, movies, photos, or other property without permission of the creator. Use only legitimate sites (those that request payment or are copyright free) when downloading online media. From the CTAPIV AT&T poster located at <http://www.ctap4.org/cybersafety/> Threads

18 Definition: Inappropriate content has been
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Definition: Inappropriate content has been defined in CIPA* as visual depictions that are obscene, child pornography, or material "harmful to minors" It can also include images of violence, hate group or extremist material, illegal activities and online advertising CIPA: The Children’s Internet Protection Act affects schools and libraries that receive E-rate discounts for Internet access. CIPA requires that districts develop an Internet Safety Plan addressing: 1.Access to inappropriate content. 2.Safety and security when using electronic communications. 3.Unauthorized online access, "hacking” etc. 4.Unauthorized disclosure and use of personal information. Threads

19 CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Unraveling the facts… A white supremacist group registered the domain name in order to masquerade as a legitimate resource Federal policies created to protect our children include CIPA, COPPA and DOPA CIPA Affects schools and libraries that receive E-rate discounts for Internet access or internal connections and also applies to recipients of certain federal education technology funding. The Children's Internet Protection Act requires that districts develop an Internet Safety Plan that addresses the following elements:1.Access by minors to inappropriate matter on the Internet and World Wide Web.2.Safety and security of minors when using electronic mail, chat rooms, and other forms of direct electronic communications.3.Unauthorized online access by minors, including "hacking" and other unlawful activities.4.Unauthorized disclosure, use, and dissemination of personal information regarding minors.5.Measures designed to restrict minors' access to materials harmful to minors. (Willard <http://csriu.org/onlinedocs/documents/checklist.html>) COPPA The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, enforced by the Federal Trade Commission, requires commercial website operators to get parental consent before collecting any personal information from kids under 13. COPPA allows teachers to act on behalf of a parent during school activities online, but does not require them to do so. That is, the law does not require teachers to make decisions about the collection of their students' personal information. <http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/online/teachers.htm> DOPA MySpace and other social-networking sites like LiveJournal.com and Facebook are the potential targets for a proposed federal law, Deleting Online Predators Act, that would effectively require most schools and libraries to render those Web sites inaccessible to minors. The concern by many over DOPA is that it would block a broad category of commercial Web sites that let users create public "Web pages or profiles" and also offer a discussion board, chat room, or service. This category covers far more than social-networking sites. It would also sweep in a wide range of interactive Web sites and services, including Blogger.com, AOL and Yahoo's instant-messaging features that are effectively being used for learning applications in many educational settings. <http://news.com.com/ _ html>

20 Inappropriate content can occur on any computer by accident
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Unraveling the facts… Inappropriate content can occur on any computer by accident Only a small fraction of the materials on the Internet could reasonably be classified as inappropriate for children… Unfortunately, that small fraction is highly visible and controversial. Facts from: Under parent resources is a parent video from Wired Safety on Parental Controls for Preventing Exposure to Pornography Online <http://www.wiredsafety.org/wiredlearning/videos/index.html> Parent Controls Video

21 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students:
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students: Tell a trusted adult, teacher or parent if you come across inappropriate content. Know how to use the back button or log off immediately when you find material that makes you feel uncomfortable. Children can also be educated to understand what is appropriate and what is not, in an age-appropriate way. Make sure your kids know what is suitable for children and what is not. If your child comes to you with a question about an inappropriate web site, be sure to thank them for asking you.

22 To-Dos (cont’d): Don’t download files from people you don’t know.
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos (cont’d): Don’t download files from people you don’t know. Use filtered searches and systems; ask your teacher or librarian for help Use Ask.com as your search engine or set your preferences in Google for strict filtering Threads

23 Definition: A Cyber predator uses the Internet
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Definition: A Cyber predator uses the Internet to hunt for victims to take advantage of in ANY way, including sexually, emotionally, psychologically or financially Cyber predators know how to manipulate kids, creating trust and friendship where none should exist The Netsmartz video: Amy’s Choice tells the true story of a 15-year-old girl who left home to meet in person with a man she first "met" online. The story is told in Amy’s own words and is compelling and might be useful in opening up a dialogue with kids. There are accompanying activity cards. Nancy Willard describes the need to educate kids in stranger literacy, the ability to determine the relative safety and veracity of individuals with whom one is communicating online who are unknown in person. <http://csriu.org/onlinedocs/pdf/srui/sruilisting.html>

24 Cyber predators can be sent to prison.
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Unraveling the facts… Cyber predators can be sent to prison. What children need to look out for is not a certain stereotype of a dangerous person but certain types of behavior… Use teachable moments, even headline news, to make discussion and education relevant. This CBS News article from Larry Magid has some great tips for using teachable moments to educate on this topic as he talks abou the Senator Mark Foley scandal that took place October, 2006. “Children should be reminded not to engage in online discussions of a sexual nature with anyone, especially adults or people they don’t know. Kids and parents should know the warning signs of a potential predator including excessive praise, questions about what they’re wearing or what they’re doing or questions designed to determine whether their parents are nearby including where’s the computer in the house?” To read more from Larry Magid’s article, see: <http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/10/08/scitech/pcanswer/main shtml>

25 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students:
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos: Remember to share guidelines with your students: Encourage your schools to add a small cyber tips section to their school newsletters. Remind student to think twice before sharing any information about themselves.

26 Cyber Predator Awareness
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 To-Dos (cont’d): If you suspect that you are being stalked or the victim of inappropriate communication, report it to a trusted adult or to the CyberTipline. Under the parent resources, Internet Safety and Cyber Predator Awareness is a resource from the State of Ohio's Attorney General's Office to educate you on Cyber Predators. <http://www.ag.state.oh.us/citizen/isafety/index.asp> Cyber Predator Awareness Threads

27 When Children We Hope They Learn. . .
CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Start School, Go Online, When Children We Hope They Learn. . . Don’t talk to strangers in cyberspace Look both ways before crossing the street clicking   , no  cyberbullies allowed Play nicely with other children Slide modified from COSN presentation, the Consortium for School Networking’s Safeguarding the Wired Schoolhouse project. <http://safewiredschools.cosn.org/toolkit/files.cfm> Ask any child to give you some tips to be safe on the Internet – they know the tips, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they USE them. Youth need the ability to internalize knowledge and set positive behavioral responses in order to…recognize and avoid dangerous, destructive, or unlawful online behavior, and to respond appropriately. We need to utilize teachable moments and consider comprehensive K-12 curriculums. If something happens that scares you, seek help from an adult you trust !!!

28 CTAP Region IV 1/20/07 Slide modified from COSN presentation, the Consortium for School Networking’s Safeguarding the Wired Schoolhouse project. <http://safewiredschools.cosn.org/toolkit/files.cfm> Ask any child to give you some tips to be safe on the Internet – they know the tips, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they USE them. Youth need the ability to internalize knowledge and set positive behavioral responses in order to…recognize and avoid dangerous, destructive, or unlawful online behavior, and to respond appropriately. We need to utilize teachable moments and consider comprehensive K-12 curriculums.


Download ppt "CyberSafety Unraveled"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google