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SMART Goals Training Presentation September and October, 2012 Self-Assessment-Step 1 of 5 Step Cycle Reading Public Schools.

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Presentation on theme: "SMART Goals Training Presentation September and October, 2012 Self-Assessment-Step 1 of 5 Step Cycle Reading Public Schools."— Presentation transcript:

1 SMART Goals Training Presentation September and October, 2012 Self-Assessment-Step 1 of 5 Step Cycle Reading Public Schools

2 Overview of Training Process District Wide Staff Meeting Overview of 5 Step Cycle September 19 or 20-Inservice Day Self-Assessment October 3 rd Inservice SMART Goal Development

3 3 Every educator is an active participant in the evaluation process Collaboration and Continuous Learning are the focus Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Continuous Learning Every educator conducts an analysis of evidence of student learning, growth, and achievement Every educator conducts an assessment of practice against Performance Standards. Prepares to strategically identify professional practice and student learning goals.

4 Self-Assessment Reading Public Schools TAP Presentation Fall, 2012 Self-Assessment Workshop

5 Please refer to the workbook during this section for more information

6 The self-assessment process … Establishes a continuous improvement plan for every educator Promotes professional growth and continuous learning Keeps student learning at the core of all instructional and professional practice decisions Accelerates and builds upon work by supporting a through- line of goals informed by district and school goals Builds consistency across the school and district 6 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

7 Step 1: Self-Assessment Components According to the regulations Self-assessment must include: 1. an analysis of evidence of student learning, growth, and achievement for students under the educator's responsibility; 2. an assessment of practice against Performance Standards; and 3. proposed goals to pursue to improve practice and student learning, growth, and achievement (35.06(2)(a)(1-3)) 7 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

8 Step 1: Self-Assessment As part of the self-assessment process the following should occur: An analysis of evidence of student learning, growth, and achievement for students under the educators responsibilities An assessment of practice against each of the four Performance Standards of effective practice using the district rubric. Proposed goals to pursue. The self-assessment using the performance rubric should be completed by October 2 nd on BaselineEdge. Please note that the self-assessment step cannot be viewed by your administrator. This part of the process should be completed on Baseline Edge using Form A and B which is called Develop Draft Goals from Self-Assessment on BaselineEdge, no later than October 8 th.

9 Self-Assessmen t Analysis of Evidence of student learning, growth and achievement Assessment of Practice against performance standards Proposed goals to pursue to improve practice and student learning.

10 Which Performance Rubric Do I Use for Self-Assessment? General Classroom Rubric PreK-High School Special Education ELL Vocational Education World Languages Health, PE, Family and Consumer Science, Arts Specialized Instructional Support Personnel for Counselors School Social Workers and Adjustment Counselors Guidance Counselors School Psychologists Specialized Instructional Support Personnel for Nurses and Specialists School Nurses Library Media Specialists Technology Integration Specialists Reading specialists OT/PT Speech and Language

11 Questions to Ask During Self-Assessment As you are reviewing student data or are thinking about which data should be used, ask yourself the following questions: What do you want your students to know? How will you know if they know it? What will you do with the students who dont learn what they are supposed to learn? What will you do with the students that already know what they are supposed to know?

12 Step 2: Proposing the Goals After conducting the self-assessment, educators are required to: Propose goals to pursue to improve practice and student learning, growth, and achievement, including at least one: Student learning goal; and Professional practice goal Goals can be constructed for individuals, teams, departments, or groups of educators who share responsibility for student results. These are strongly encouraged. Exceptions First Year Teachers (Year 2 or 3 teachers at guidance of Principal) Teachers who have not received ratings of Proficient or Exemplary

13 Goal Setting Evaluator reviews goals the Educator has proposed in the self- assessment. The evaluator retains final authority over goals to be involved in an educators plan. Educators meet with the evaluator by October 15 th to develop their educator plan. New educators must meet by October 1 st. Educator plan should be completed by October 30.

14 Coherence Through Aligned Goals Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 14

15 Creating a Through Line for Coherence DistrictSchoolEducator Teams District Goals/InitiativesSchool Goals/Initiatives Standards for Effective Teaching Practice Target IndicatorsPotential Team Goals I.Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment II.Teaching All Students III.Family and Community Engagement IV.Professional Culture Create a through line from district school educator team goals Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 15

16 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 16

17 An Example Reading Public Schools SMART Goal Training September, 2012

18 Meet Sally Smith Sally Smith: Fourth grade teacher 11 years of teaching experience Two-Year Self-Directed Growth Plan Her school: Elementary level with 400 students 16% Students with disabilities 1% with limited English proficiency Student growth on MCAS in recent years has contributed to a positive school climate 18 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

19 Sally Smiths Brainstorm 19 StrengthsNeeds Improving student performance in both Math and ELA for students who enter my class performing below grade level Teaching classrooms with diverse needs (especially meeting the needs of student with an IEP) Family outreach and communication Additional support for implementing the revised MA Curriculum Frameworks Improving communication with families for whom English is a second language Strengthen leadership skills Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

20 Summary of Sally Smiths Student Data Refer to the Workbook 20 Part 1: Analysis of Student Learning, Growth, and Achievement Briefly summarize areas of strength and high-priority concerns for students under your responsibility for the upcoming school year. Cite evidence such as results from available assessments. This form should be individually submitted by educator, but Part 1 can also be used by individuals and/or teams who jointly review and analyze student data. 603 CMR (2)(a)1 Strengths: the DRA-II shows that most of my incoming students have strong reading foundations, including accuracy and fluency. According to their previous teachers, students enjoy reading fiction and creative writing. In 3 rd grade overall, students have Reading and Math scores that are higher than the state average with Math (68% Proficient) slightly higher than Reading (62% Proficient). High-priority concerns: 5/20 incoming students are ELLs and 5/20 have IEPs (mostly focused on literacy goals). Six have reading comprehension at the 2 rd grade level and five have reading comprehension around the 3 rd grade level according to the DRA-II. Students with weak reading comprehension also have weaker reading fluency. Students will need additional support to be reading and comprehending successfully at grade level by the end of the year. There are also four students reading above grade level as well, so instruction and materials in that area will need to be strongly differentiated. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

21 Sallys Source Data 21 Consider the following questions: What types of information did Sally use to develop this student profile? What other sources of data could Sally have considered? Based on this analysis, what types of student learning needs might Sally focus on in the coming year? Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

22 Sally Smiths Brainstorm 22 StrengthsNeeds Improving student performance in both Math and ELA for students who enter my class performing below grade level Teaching classrooms with diverse needs (especially meeting the needs of student with an IEP) Family outreach and communication Additional support for implementing the revised MA Curriculum Framework Improving communication with families for whom English is a second language Strengthen leadership skills PROMPT: Where do I feel most comfortable in my profession? Where have I seen positive results? PROMPT: What do I find most difficult? Where would I like more help from others? Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

23 Sally Smiths Professional Practice Skills Pull out the Rubric-at-a-Glance page (Last Page of Workbook) Circle the Indicator(s) that best align with Sally Smiths strengths and areas of need 23 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

24 24 StrengthsNeeds Improving student performance in both Math and ELA for students who enter my class performing below grade level ( I-A: Curriculum & Planning; II-A: Instruction) Teaching classrooms with diverse needs (especially meeting the needs of student with an IEP) (II-A: Instruction; II-B: Learning Environment; II-D: Expectations) Family outreach and communication (Standard III) Additional support for implementing the revised MA Curriculum framework (I-A: Curriculum & Planning) Improving communication with families for whom English is a second language (III-C: Communications) Strengthen leadership skills (IV- C: Collaboration; IV-D: Decision- Making) Sallys Assessment of Practice Against the Rubric Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

25 What Sally Does Next… Read the elements of the Indicators youve identified, focusing on the proficient description 4. Which Indicators best align with Sallys strengths and areas of need? 5. What key words are used to describe what it looks like to be proficient in these areas? 6. Based on what she identified as areas for improvement and using the rubric as a guide, what are some specific aspects of performance that Sally might need to focus on? 25 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

26 Sallys Form A (Part 2) Individual Strengths: Former student MCAS data (achievement and growth) and benchmark data shows that I am successful at improving student performance in both Math and ELA for students who enter my class performing below grade level. I have also received positive feedback from my peers and principal regarding my ability to differentiate my instruction to meet diverse needs (Indicator II-A). I have also been successful at increasing communication and collaboration with parents, as evidence by increasing attendance to parent nights, homework workshops, and internet traffic to my classroom website. (Standard III).

27 Sallys Form A, Part 2 (Continued) Areas for support: I would like increased opportunities to serve as a mentor and model for my peers, and support in developing leadership skills. I am also concerned that although my past performance with regard to Curriculum and Planning (Indicator I-A) has been strong, I will face new challenges when we begin to implement the revised curriculum frameworks. I would like additional support in transitioning to the new frameworks.

28 Sallys Form A, Part 2 (Continued) Team Our 4 th grade team met to review the rubric and agreed that one of our team strengths is parent engagement. However, we are collectively concerned about the implementation of the revised curriculum frameworks, and would like to have additional supports (time, PD, etc) to develop our skills with regard to unit design, backward mapping to the new standards, and assessments.

29 Getting to Goal Topics What needs jump out at you as the most pressing? Do you see any that could be combined into a concrete student learning goal or a professional practice goal? Do you see any opportunities for alignment between a student learning goal and a professional practice goal? 29 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

30 What does Sally do next? Based upon Sallys Self-Assessment, her draft goals could focus on the following areas: 1. Improve reading comprehension for all students, especially ELL and students on an IEP 2. Align the grade 4 literacy and math curriculum to the Common Core State Standards and develop district determined measures that align with those standards. 3. Complete a new mentor training program. The next two slides give examples of how Sally could write her three goals. Refer to Page 6 and 7 in the workbook.

31 Student Learning SMART Goal Check whether goal is individual or team; write team name if applicable. Professional Practice SMART Goal 1 Check whether goal is individual or team; write team name if applicable. Individual X Team: Julie Jones (Grade 4 Special Education Teacher), Barbara Bingham (Reading Specialist) and Fred Fosey (ELL Teacher) By the end of the school year, all students in my class will advance at least one grade level in reading comprehension and ELL and students who have literacy goals on their IEP will advance at least two grade levels in reading comprehension as measured by the DRA-II. This will be a team goal with the Grade 4 Special Education Teacher, Reading Specialist and the ELL Teacher. Individual X Team: Bob Smith and Maria Nunez (Grade 4 Teachers) By the end of the school year, our grade level team will have successfully aligned 100% of the Massachusetts Common Core State Standards in literacy and mathematics for Grade 4. We will work with our grade level colleagues throughout the district to develop at least two district determined measures in literacy by the end of the school year that are aligned with the CCSS.

32 Professional Practice SMART Goal 2 Check whether goal is an individual or team/department goal; write team/department name if applicable. X Individual Team/Department/Grade Level Name: School wide By the end of the school year, I will have successfully completed the new mentor training that is offered by the Reading Public Schools. As a result of that training, I will be able to mentor a colleague in my school during the school year.

33 Looking Ahead Laying the Foundation 1. School teams will work together to develop a completed educator plan. We will focus on this on October As a team, action steps will be identified. 3. Merge these activities into one Educator Plan that addresses each of the two goals in a strategic, coherent manner. Then document the needed supports and resources and determine a timeline. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 33 Student Learning Goal(s) and Professional Practice Goal(s) Planned Activity ActionSupports/Resources From School/District Timeline/Benchmark or Frequency

34 Next Step: Educator Plan Development Designed to provide Educators with feedback for improvement, professional growth, and leadership Plan must be aligned to the standards and indicators, as well as, district and school goals. Shall include At least one goal related to the improvement of practice tied to one or more Performance Standards At least one goal for the improvement of the learning, growth, and achievement of the students under the Educators responsibility An outline of actions the Educator must take to attain the goals and benchmarks to assess progress. Actions must include specified professional development and learning activities. Examples could include, coursework, self-study, action research, curriculum development, study groups with peers, and implementing new programs.

35 Educator Plans: Requirements and Timelines Self-Directed Growth Plan Rated Proficient or Exemplary Two-year plan Developed by the educator Directed Growth Plan Rated Needs Improvement One-year plan or less Developed by educator and evaluator Improvement Plan Rated Unsatisfactory At least 30 calendar days; up to one year Developed by the evaluator Developing Educator Plan Without Professional Status One-year plan or less Developed by the educator and evaluator Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 35

36 What Plan Will I Be On For This Year? For School Year School Year School Year Non-PTS (Will be Non-PTS Next Year)Developing Educator Plan Non-PTS (Will be PTS Next Year)Self-Directed Growth Plan PTS on Year 1 of TAP CycleYear 2 of Self-Directed Growth Plan PTS on Year 2 of TAP CycleSelf-Directed Growth Plan or Directed Growth Plan PTS New to An AssignmentDeveloping Educator Plan or Self-Directed Growth Plan PTS on Year 1 of Alternative EvaluationWill Complete Year 2 of Alternative Evaluation, then new TAP system in PTS on Year 2 of Alternative EvaluationSelf-Directed Growth Plan PTS on Additional Assistance Plan and will continue on it next year Directed Growth Plan PTS on Additional Assistance Plan and will not continue on it next year Self-Directed Growth Plan

37 Implementation Responsibility Educator Responsibilities: Identifying, collecting & organizing artifacts/evidence related to goal progress. Documenting action steps completed. Collecting and submitting common artifacts. Collecting and submitting evidence related to Standards III and IV. Evaluator Responsibilities: Making resources and supports available. Identifying common artifacts/evidence. Observing practice and providing regular and specific feedback on performance. Monitoring progress – including midpoint check-ins. 37

38 Assignment For Next Time (By October 2) 1. Use the educator rubric (Self-Assessment Tool for Classroom Teacher or Specialized Instructional Support Personnel Rubric) to self-assess where you are currently for each element. Do this on Baseline Edge. Highlight the appropriate level for each element. 2. Be as self-reflective as possible. This self-assessment is for your own use only and does not have to be shared with others. Your evaluator cannot view it. 3. Refer to the Educator Evaluation: Self-Assessment and Goals Development Workbook for more samples and information in preparation for the October 3 rd Inservice Day.


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