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Training for Teachers and Specialists

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1 Training for Teachers and Specialists
Delaware Performance Appraisal System II for Teachers and Specialists : Revised July 2011 Training Module 3 The DPAS II Process Training for Teachers and Specialists Welcome to Training Module 3: the DPAS II Process for Teachers and Specialists.

2 Training Overview Four separate modules:
Module 1: Introduction to DPAS II Module 2: DPAS II and the Delaware Framework Module 3: The DPAS II Process Conferences (pre- and post-observation) Observations Written documents (Forms) Improvement Plans Challenges Module 4: Component Five – Student Improvement During this module you will review the following activities of this process: conferencing, observations, written documents, improvement plans and challenges.

3 Materials for this module
PowerPoint Presentation DPAS II Guide for Teachers DPAS II Brochure for easy component reference You will need to access the following materials, all DPAS II materials are available in electronic format on the DPAS II website (http://www.doe.k12.de.us/csa/dpasii/default.shtml) : This presentation The DPAS II Guide for Teachers The DPAS II Brochure, for easy component and criteria reference Please be sure you have access to these materials.

4 Review Five Components of DPAS II Teachers Specialists Administrators
Planning & Preparation Vision & Goals Component 2 Classroom Environment Professional Practice & Delivery of Services Culture of Learning Component 3 Instruction Professional Collaboration & Consultation Management Component 4 Professional Responsibilities Component 5 Student Improvement The DPAS II process exists for all 3 groups of Delaware educators—teachers, specialists and administrators. This chart shows the component titles of the 3 groups evaluated by the DPAS II process—teachers, specialists and administrators. Although the components differ slightly, there is considerable alignment between and among the three systems. The biggest differences are seen in components 1 through 3. Components 4 and 5 are very similar for all 3 groups.

5 DPAS II: Process Student Growth Measures and Professional Responsibilities Component 4 and 5 New beginning ! Pre-observation Conference Component 1, 2, 3, and 4 Observation Components 1, 2, 3, and 4 Post-observation Conference Level of Performance Ratings Formative Feedback Documentation The two principal features of the DPAS II are its conceptual framework, including the rubrics and indicators of performance, and the process. The activities in each step of the process generate the data used in the appraisal. First we will go through an overview of the steps in the DPAS II process. Then we will review each specific step, including activities, in more detail. As you work through this training module please read the DPAS II Guide for Teachers, Section III. There each step of the process is detailed for you as well as the time period within which any part of the process must be completed. Student Growth Measures Selection —there are special procedures in place for the school year – be sure to use the insert outlining the policy This replaces the Goal-setting Conference in the previous version of DPAS II. Student Growth Measures Selection and Student Improvement (Component 5) ratings will be the focus of training module #4. Pre observation Form and conference provides the evaluator with information about the upcoming observation that may not be directly observable, allowing teachers and specialists time to clarify what the evaluator will be observing. Observation provides a view of the teacher or specialist practice where a observable evidence is collected and used to assess performance. Post Observation conference is when the teacher or specialist and evaluator discuss evidence collected during the observation. Components 1, 2, 3, and 4 are discussed with the use of rubrics. Levels of Performance Ratings—at the post observation conference, with the use of rubrics, the teacher or specialist and evaluator should reach a common understanding of the teacher’s performance during the observation. Formative Feedback Documentation—after the post-observation conference, the Formative Feedback Form documents what was observed and then discussed at the conference.

6 DPAS II Process, (continued)
7. Summative Evaluation Conference Component 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 8. Summative Evaluation Documentation Improvement Plans The Challenge Process 7. The Summative Evaluation Conference occurs at the end of the evaluation cycle. The evaluator shares overall impressions of a teacher’s or specialist’s practice based on previously shared evidence as well as a summary of the teacher’s or specialist’s performance as it relates to all 5 components. 8. The Summative Evaluation Documentation includes the evaluator’s ratings of the teacher’s or specialist’s performance in each component and an overall rating. Improvement Plans are developed to help teachers and specialists focus on areas where they need extra assistance to improve their practice. The Challenge Process—Sometimes a teacher or specialist will disagree with his or her evaluator’s assessment. It is desirable to resolve the differences directly with the evaluator, if at all possible, prior to a formal challenge. If a resolution cannot be reached, the teacher or specialist may submit a written challenge to the evaluator's supervisor.

7 What is new in the DPAS II Process in 2011?
Changes to the DPAS II process, beginning in the school year Component 4 assessed throughout the evaluation process Use of rubrics during the evaluation process Addition of “expectations” and definition of recommendation versus expectation District administrator must meet with the teacher during the challenge process There have been changes to all steps in the the DPAS II Process that will be implemented beginning in the school year. We will discuss these changes as we review each step in more detail.

8 Student Growth Measures
Replaces Goal Setting in previous version of DPAS II Will be discussed in detail in Training Module 4 The Student Growth Measures Selection Form and conference replace the Goal-setting Form and conference that were carried out in the previous version of DPAS II. This change is a result of changes to state regulation. There have been significant changes to Component 5, Student Improvement. Due to the complexity of those changes we are dedicating Training Module Four to Component 5, including the Student Growth Measures Selection Form and conference step in the DPAS II process.

9 Professional Responsibilities
Form completed in Fall Discussions held during pre and post-observation conferences Changes to Professional Responsibilities document Discussion during summative evaluation conference Component 4, Professional Responsibilities, now is discussed throughout the evaluation process. Each fall teachers and specialists will fill out the Professional Responsibilities form. However, if the district allows and both the administrator and teacher or specialist agree, then the Professional Responsibilities form may be optional for Experienced Teachers and Specialists.  The Professional Responsibilities form may not be waived for Novice Teachers or Specialists.  Professional Responsibilities may then be discussed during the Pre-observation and Post-observation Conferences. Discussions about professional responsibilities during the Pre-observation Conference allow the teacher or specialist and evaluator to draft and/or adapt Professional Responsibilities plans. Component 4 discussions during the Pre-observation Conference are intended to ensure that professional growth opportunities are aligned to school and teacher or specialist improvement goals. Component 4 discussions during the Post-observation Conference will allow the educator and evaluator to assess whether or not the Professional Responsibilities form should be amended in light of observation feedback. Any updates to the Professional Responsibilities Form should be discussed and recorded during the Post-observation Conference.

10 Pre-observation Form Conference
Required for Novice Teachers and Specialists May be waived for Experienced Teachers and Specialists ONLY IF both the teacher or specialist and evaluator agree Conference Required for all announced observations – may not be waived Does not apply to unannounced observations Whenever possible, held in teacher’s classroom or specialist’s work area The Pre-observation Conference is required for all announced observations. However, if the district allows and both the administrator and teacher or specialist agree, then the Pre-observation Form may be optional for announced observations of Experienced Teachers or Specialists. The Pre-observation Form may not be waived for Novice Teachers or Specialists. The Pre-observation Conference is only applicable prior to an “announced” observation. Whenever possible the Pre-observation Conference should be held in the teacher’s classroom or the specialist’s work area. Holding the Pre-observation Conference in the teacher’s classroom or in the specialist’s work area is important for three reasons. First, it provides both the teacher or specialist and evaluator to have ready access to lesson/session materials that may strengthen the pre-observation discussion. Second, it allows the evaluator to get a sense of the physical environment, including any limitations it may create, prior to the observation. Third, it permits the evaluator and teacher or specialist to plan an appropriate location for observation, one that will minimize disruption while maximizing ability to observe the full workspace. The Pre-observation Conference should always be held in a private location. Whenever possible, the evaluator should schedule the conference during private time within in the educator’s work space. However, there are some times when this is not possible. For example, if two educators share a work space, then the conference should only be held in the work area when other educators and students are not present. If this is not possible, then the conference may be held in a different, yet private, location.

11 Component 4 Discussions Throughout the Process
Form Pre-observation discussions Post-observation discussions Reflection Sheet Summative Conference Component 4, Professional Responsibilities is discussed throughout the evaluation process. Each fall teachers and specialists will fill out the Professional Responsibilities form. However, if the district allows and both the administrator and teacher agree, then the Professional Responsibilities form may be optional for Experienced Teachers or Specialists.  The Professional Responsibilities form may not be waived for Novice Teachers of Specialists.  Professional Responsibilities may then be discussed during the Pre-observation and Post-observation Conferences. Discussions about professional responsibilities during the Pre-observation Conference allow the teacher or specialist and evaluator to draft and/or adapt Professional Responsibilities plans. Component 4 discussions during the Pre-observation Conference are intended to ensure that professional growth opportunities are aligned to school and teacher or specialist improvement goals. Component 4 discussions during the Post-observation Conference will allow the educator and evaluator to assess whether or not the Professional Responsibilities form should be amended in light of observation feedback. Any updates to the Professional Responsibilities Form should be discussed and recorded during the Post-observation Conference. Prior to the Summative Evaluation conference, the teacher or specialist may choose to complete the Professional Responsibilities Reflection Sheet. The teacher or specialist may choose to complete this form, in whole or in part, and use it to complete the Professional Responsibilities form. The teacher or specialist may also bring this form to any evaluation conference. The teacher or specialist has full discretion as to whether this form is completed and/or shared with the evaluator. The teacher or specialist should then bring the completed Professional Responsibilities Form to the Summative Conference where he or she will discuss achievements and or improvements made throughout the evaluation cycle.

12 Observations Announced or Unannounced Length of observations
Frequency of observations Limitations on when observations may occur Evidence collection In some cases observations are announced. The teacher or specialist receives advanced notification of the observation. In other cases, the observation is unannounced and there is no advance notification. The quality of teaching or professional practice should be consistent across both situations. It is strongly recommended that the first observation be announced and of sufficient length to see a lesson from beginning to end. Subsequent observations may be announced or unannounced but should be of sufficient length, at least thirty (30) minutes, so that the evaluator can analyze the lesson or session and accurately assess performance. Appraisal cycles for summative and formative evaluations may be found in Section III of the guides for teachers and specialists. Appraisal cycles vary depending on whether the teacher or specialist is a novice or is experienced and the teacher’s last summative evaluation rating. If a teacher or specialist needs to improve his or her practice, then there must be a reasonable amount of time between observations. Time between observations must be sufficient for teachers or specialists to improve their performance and to have had the opportunity to access appropriate supports. Observations may not begin until students have been in attendance for five (5) full days, unless an Improvement Plan calls for such an observation. Observations must be completed before the last five (5) days during which students are in attendance for the entire day. In a setting where more than one staff member is working with students, only one staff member may be observed during a single observation period. Evidence: Not all components will be observed during every lesson or session the educator provides. Moreover, some observations, including observations related to Improvement Plans or formative feedback expectations, may be targeted to assess educator progress for one component. However, all components must be assessed before the evaluator develops the summative evaluation document. All evidence collected must be: Fact-based Include specific detail about relevant observed events Show clear evidence of pre and post-observation conferencing discussions Be related to components and criteria and Reflect the appropriate rating as indicated in component rubrics Evidence may be heard, seen, or touched. The indicators of performance included in the DPAS II Guides are intended to be used as example performances for which an evaluator may collect evidence during observation. Indicators of performance contained in the guides are not exhaustive. Additional types of performance may be observed and evidence about those performances may be collected as long as it is relevant and appropriate for the component being assessed. The evaluator is expected to collect evidence related to each component and criterion throughout the observation cycle; however, the evaluator is not expected to collect evidence related to each indicator of performance within the guide. In addition, the evaluator may collect evidence of performances beyond those listed in the guide. All performances must be aligned to the components, criteria, and/or elements in the guide and reflect proficiency.

13 Post-observation Conference
Requirements Teacher Responsibilities Lesson Reflection Template - New beginning ! – OPTIONAL Whenever possible, held in teacher’s classroom or specialist’s work area Timing All observations must be followed up by a Post-observation conference. The conference must be held within ten (10) working days of the observation. However, the Post-observation Conference should be held as soon as reasonable after the observation to ensure timely feedback to the teacher. Teachers and specialists are expected to come to the conference prepared to discuss their reflections on their performance during the lesson or session observed any special circumstances or events that impacted the lesson or session adjustments made to the planned lesson or session and the rationale for these adjustments ways to improve their future practice The Lesson Reflection Template included in Section IV of the guide is a valuable tool for teachers and specialists to reflect on their performance during the observed lesson. This form is optional. The teacher or specialist may choose to complete this form and bring it to the Post-observation Conference. The teacher of specialist has full discretion as to whether this form is completed and/or shared with the evaluator. Whenever possible, this conference should be held in the teacher’s classroom or the specialist’s work space. Holding the Post-observation Conference in the teacher’s classroom or in the specialist’s work area is important for two reasons. First, it provides both the teacher or specialist and evaluator ready access to lesson or session materials that may strengthen the post-observation discussion. Second, it allows the evaluator to reference evidence in the environment where the observation occurred and to note any improvements that may have been made since the observation. The Post-observation Conference should always be held in privacy. Whenever possible, the evaluator should schedule the conference during private time within the educator’s work space. However, there are some times when this is not possible. For example, if two educators share a work space, then the conference should only be held in the work area when other educators and students are not present. If this is not possible, then the conference may be held in a different, yet private, location.

14 Levels of Performance Rating
Common understanding between teacher or specialist and the evaluator Teachers are expected to use rubrics: For reflection and self-assessment AND To develop a common understanding of his or her own strengths and areas for improvement Evaluators are expected to use rubrics: To focus pre-observation, post-observation, and summative conference discussions with teachers To develop a common understanding of the teacher’s strengths and areas for improvement AND As a guide to organize relevant evidence of teacher performance At the conclusion of the Post-observation Conference, the teacher or specialist and evaluator should have a common understanding of the educator’s performance during the observation. Component and/or criterion rubrics are used to focus their discussion and determine accurate performance levels. During a formative evaluation it is not necessary to document a level of performance for every criterion or for every element related to the criterion.  Component rubrics within the DPAS II Guides should be used to guide discussions about educator performance during the observation. The rubrics provide a context for the educator and evaluator in order to reach consensus on levels of performance. However, if the educator and evaluator are unable to reach consensus, the evaluator’s decision prevails.

15 Formative Feedback Requirements and Timeline Evidence
Formative rating documentation How do rubric levels translate to Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory performance? After the Post-observation Conference formative feedback is documented on the Formative Feedback Form. A completed Formative Feedback Form is required for both announced and unannounced observations. The completed Formative Feedback Form must be provided to the teacher within ten (10) working days of the conference. The teacher should sign the Formative Feedback Form and return it to the evaluator within 5 working days. A copy of this form with both signatures will be provided to the teacher. All evidence documented in the Formative Feedback Form must be: Fact-based Include specific detail about relevant observed events Show clear evidence of pre and post-observation conferencing discussions Be related to components and criteria and Reflect the appropriate rating as indicated in component rubrics Overall Lesson performance is determined as follows…If: • a teacher or specialist shows evidence of Unsatisfactory performance for one or more observed components, • the evaluator documents evidence of Unsatisfactory performance for one or more observed components in the Formative Feedback Form, and • the evaluator notes “Performance is Unsatisfactory” and initials the statement on the Formative Feedback Form; then overall performance for that lesson or session is considered Unsatisfactory. Otherwise, the overall performance is considered Satisfactory. Please note: If a teacher’s or specialist’s overall performance related to the observation and discussion is deemed unsatisfactory, the evaluator must indicate this on the Formative Feedback Form by writing “PERFORMANCE IS UNSATISFACTORY” on the form and initialing the statement. The evaluator may write this on the final page of the feedback form or on the page of the component(s) where performance is unsatisfactory. There is not a direct mapping from the Danielson rubric ratings to the Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory language in state regulation.  The reason for this is that Basic performance, from the rubrics, can be considered either Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory, depending on who is being evaluated.    Outside of the Basic rubric rating, the general translation of rubric levels to formative ratings is: Proficient and Distinguished on the rubrics are Satisfactory, Basic can go either way, Unsatisfactory on the rubrics is always Unsatisfactory. When is “Basic” performance on criteria or a full component considered Satisfactory performance and when is it considered Unsatisfactory performance? For “Novice” teachers a Basic rating may be deemed Satisfactory, however it is expected that a Novice Teacher or Specialist will rise to a Proficient rating within the 3 year initial license period. Generally, a Basic rating is NOT considered satisfactory performance for an Experienced Teacher or Specialist. Special circumstances may cause an Experienced Teacher or Specialist to revert back to basic performance for a short period of time. Examples of such situations include, but are not limited to: a change in grade level assignment, content area, building, or type of client services; or life crisis. In these cases the expectation is that the teacher or specialist will rise to proficient as soon as possible. When a Novice Teacher or Experienced Teacher with special circumstances is performing at a Basic level, that teacher should receive clear expectations for improving their performance including goals, measures, timelines, and appropriate supports. These expectations should be documented in the written evaluation feedback.

16 Summative Evaluation Requirements and Timeline Evidence
Summative ratings Summative evaluation forms The Summative Evaluation process occurs at the end of the evaluation cycle. It may be yearly or every other year depending upon the experience of the teacher and his/her past summative evaluation ratings. Appraisal cycles for summative and formative evaluations may be found in Section III of the guides for teachers and specialists. Please review this information carefully. The first step is the Summative Evaluation Conference, followed by completion of the Summative Evaluation Form. This process is the same for both novice and experienced teachers. At the Summative Evaluation Conference, the evaluator shares overall impressions of a teacher’s practice based upon previously shared evidence, as well as a summary of the teacher’s performance as it relates to all five components. It is an opportunity for a rich conversation between the evaluator and the teacher, where clarification and additional information may be provided, and where the evaluator and the teacher may discuss future professional development goals that support continuous professional growth. All evidence documented in the Summative Evaluation Form must be: Fact-based Include specific detail about relevant observed events Show clear evidence of pre and post-observation conferencing discussions Be related to components and criteria and Reflect the appropriate rating as indicated in component rubrics Summative ratings are defined in state regulation. Specific information about summative rating criteria may be found in Section III of the guides under Step 8, Summative Evaluation Documentation. These overall ratings are effective beginning with the school year. Summative Evaluation rating criteria for the school year will be included in a guide supplement and will be explained in training module 4. The guides contain two forms for Summative Feedback so that districts and charter schools have options about the level of detail they wish to provide in summative evaluation documents. The first form (streamlined) is similar to the form educators are familiar with. It allows the person being evaluated to know their rating for each component and the summative rating. The second form (detailed) provides additional information, allowing the person being evaluated to know their rating for each criterion, each component, and the summative rating. This may be useful with Novice Teachers and Specialists or for teachers or specialists who must be put on an Improvement Plan. The department recommends that districts or charter schools set uniform rules for which form will be used and under which circumstances.

17 Overall Feedback Commendations Recommendations and expectations
Difference between expectations and recommendations How expectations are communicated How expectations are documented How evaluators assess teacher and specialist performance toward expectation outcomes Documenting completed expectations Additional feedback At the end of both the formative and summative forms the evaluator writes his or her overall feedback on the teacher’s or specialist’s performance. First, the evaluator records commendations, recommendations and/or expectations for the educator. Next, the evaluator records other relevant feedback for that teacher or specialist. Commendations should be reserved for teachers and specialists who show high levels of performance or in the case of novice teachers and specialists, those who have demonstrated substantial professional growth. Teachers and specialists who perform above expectations and/or who clearly excel in any criterion or element are eligible for a commendation. Commendations are not intended for teachers showing “expected” levels of performance. Recommendations are designed to help the teacher or specialist improve his or her performance. They are a suggested course of action promoting continuous improvement that the teacher or specialist can consider. Recommendations are not binding. Expectations are specific standards of conduct or performance that must be carried out within the specific timeline indicated. The evaluator is expected to come to the Post-observation Conference prepared to discuss expectations for improvement if basic or unsatisfactory performance for any component is being discussed. After the Post-observation Conference the expectations must be clearly documented on the Formative Feedback form. A teacher with an overall rating of “Effective” but with less than four (4) Satisfactory Appraisal Components on the Summative Evaluation must have clear and specific improvement expectations outlined in the teacher’s written evaluation documentation. This is required by state regulation. If expectations for improvement are included in either a Formative or Summative Evaluation, they must be clear and specific and include a description of the evidence the teacher must exhibit/provide. There must also be clear timelines for when the teacher must show evidence of meeting the expectation. If a teacher or specialist is given expectations in the written feedback, must that teacher or specialist undergo additional observations? Not necessarily. It depends upon the expectations and the evidence required to show the expectation is met. For instance, if a teacher is expected to learn and use certain instructional strategies, then an observation would be required to assess whether or not the teacher is using those strategies. However, if the expectation is for a specialist to enter data into the online system in a timely manner, then progress can be assessed by regular checks of that specialist’s data entries. Regardless, expectations should be clearly and explicitly written in the evaluation document. This includes a description of the evidence the teacher or specialist must exhibit or provide, clear timelines for when the teacher or specialist must show evidence of meeting the expectation, and clear information about any supports being provided to the teacher or specialist. Additional questions are answered in the DPAS II Non-regulatory Guidance document

18 Challenge Process Used when a teacher disagrees with the evaluator’s assessment Different from Grievance (can only grieve process infractions) Must try to resolve difference with evaluator first Submit written challenge to evaluator’s supervisor within 15 work days of receipt of the evaluation document Within 15 work days the supervisor of the evaluator must meet with the teacher or specialist New beginning ! Within 15 work days the supervisor of the evaluator must issue a written decision Sometimes a teacher or specialist will disagree with his or her evaluator’s assessment. The teacher or specialist should first try to resolve the differences directly with the evaluator. Teachers and specialists are encouraged to discuss their concerns with the evaluator and attempt to resolve the issues prior to submitting a formal challenge. Documents generated as part of this discussion will be attached to the Summative Evaluation and become part of the appraisal record. If resolution is not reached with the evaluator, the teacher may submit a written challenge to the evaluator’s supervisor. Delaware regulation allows a teacher or specialist to challenge:  conclusions of a lesson observation if the statement "PERFORMANCE IS UNSATISFACTORY" has been included on the Formative Feedback any rating on the Summative Evaluation, either a Component Rating or the Overall Summative Rating. A teacher or specialist initiates the challenge by submitting information specific to the point of disagreement to the evaluator’s supervisor. This must be done in writing within fifteen (15) working days of the teacher's or specialist’s receipt of the evaluation document. If the evaluator’s supervisor is in the same building as the teacher or specialist, the challenge and appraisal record are submitted to a designated district or charter school-level credentialed evaluator. Within fifteen (15) working days of receiving the written challenge, the supervisor of the evaluator or designated district or charter school-level credentialed evaluator shall meet with the teacher or specialist to review and discuss the challenge and the appraisal record. The appraisal record consists of all documents used in the appraisal process, the written challenge, and any additional documents previously shared with the teacher or specialist. The supervisor shall issue a written decision to the teacher within fifteen (15) working days of the challenge hearing. If the challenge is denied, the decision shall state the reasons for denial. The decision of the supervisor of the evaluator or designated district or charter school-level credentialed evaluator is final. While a challenge process is taking place, the Improvement Plan may or may not be started by mutual agreement of teacher and evaluator. If agreement cannot be reached, the evaluator’s decision will prevail.

19 DOE monitoring of DPAS II documentation quality
Annual audit of DPAS II formative and summative evaluation documents Conducted by DOE staff in collaboration with LEA Expert Evaluators All information is strictly confidential – no evaluation documents leave the site or are specifically referenced Use of review criteria to ensure written evaluation documents provide Objective, specific, and relevant evidence of teacher performance and areas for commendation Supportive, specific, and actionable guidance, including timelines, for any recommendations and/or expectations to improve performance Each year the Department of Education will monitor the quality of DPAS II formative and summative documentation. An audit of evaluation documents will be conducted by DOE staff in collaboration with LEA Expert Evaluators. Documentation Analysis rubrics and sample evaluation documents are located in Section V of the guide. Districts and charter schools are also strongly encouraged to conduct internal evaluations of the DPAS II process. This may be done through documentation analysis, evaluator PLC’s – where evaluators conduct peer review and feedback, and/or evaluation coaching and shadowing conducted by a Development Coach or Expert Evaluator.

20 Continue to Module 4, Component 5
Module completion Read Section III of the DPAS II Guide for Teachers Using DPAS II Guide for Teachers answer the questions below– we recommend that you complete this work with an experienced peer or in a PLC. What are my responsibilities during the evaluation process? How often will I be observed this year? What level of practice do I need to reach in order to receive a commendation? What is the difference between recommendations and expectations? What are my responsibilities if my practice is not satisfactory in one or more component? Continue to Module 4, Component 5 There are two more steps you need to complete in order to conclude this training module: First, review Section III of the DPAS II Guide for Teachers Teachers and Specialists should then discuss answers to the questions in small groups. You may wish to have teachers and specialists review the Documentation Analysis Rubrics in Section V of the DPAS II Guides You may wish to have additional discussion about expectations for evaluation documentation or to discuss any district initiatives under Race to the Top focused on improved monitoring of evaluation implementation. Please submit questions you are unable to answer to Amelia Hodges The department will use this feedback to compile a Frequently Asked Questions document.


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