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The Color Wheel An Introduction to the Color Wheel and Color Theory By Pam & Tim OLoughlin Art Specialists Oshkosh Area School District Resource List.

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Presentation on theme: "The Color Wheel An Introduction to the Color Wheel and Color Theory By Pam & Tim OLoughlin Art Specialists Oshkosh Area School District Resource List."— Presentation transcript:

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2 The Color Wheel An Introduction to the Color Wheel and Color Theory By Pam & Tim OLoughlin Art Specialists Oshkosh Area School District Resource List NEXT Weblinks

3 The Color Wheel The color wheel shows relationships between the colors. Artists often use the color wheel to help understand how colors relate to one another. NEXT

4 Primary, Secondary, & Tertiary Colors Warm Colors Cool Colors Neutrals Color Schemes Monochromatic, Complementary, & Analogous Mixing Colors Color Meaning Advanced Color Theory Hue, Intensity, & Value Color Wheel Web Links The Color Wheel Lets learn about Color! Click on the Red Boxes to the Right to Proceed

5 COLOR MIXINGCOLOR MIXING It's easy to mix paints to make new colors. You can use the primary colors (red, blue, and yellow) plus black and white to get all of the colors of the rainbow! NEXT Return to Main Page Main

6 COLOR MIXING Primary + Secondary When you mix the Primary Colors together, you get the Secondary Colors. What colors do these make? Red + Yellow = Red + Blue = Blue + Yellow = Orange Green Purple Click the Mouse Anywhere to Reveal the Answers NEXT Return to Main Page Page

7 Making Tints and Shades A shade of color is made by mixing that color with black. A tint of color is made by mixing that color with white. NEXT Return to MainThe Color Wheel Page The Color WheelThe Color Wheel COLOR MIXING Tints and Shades

8 This painting by Vincent Van Gogh, Fields in a Rising Storm, has tints and shades of blue in the sky, and tints and shades of green in the fields. Fields in a Rising Storm By Vincent Van Gogh Return to Main Page Main COLOR MIXING Tints and Shades NEXT

9 The lightness or darkness of a color is called its value. Tints are light values that are made by mixing a color with white. For example, pink is a tint of red (red+white), and gray is a tint of black (black+white). Shades are dark values that are made by mixing a color with black. Maroon is a shade of red, and navy is a shade of blue. Return to Main Page Main COLOR MIXING Value, Tints, & Shades Go to Value

10 Color Schemes Monochromatic Color Scheme Analogous Color Scheme Complementary Color Scheme Split-Complementary Color Scheme Double Split-Complement Color Scheme Triadic Color Scheme Click on the Red Boxes Above to Proceed Color Scheme Game Return to Main Page Main

11 The Color Wheel Primary Colors Secondary Colors Tertiary Colors Return to MainThe Color Wheel Page The Color WheelThe Color Wheel Click on the Red Boxes to the Right to Proceed

12 Primary Colors The primary colors are red, blue, and yellow. Primary colors cannot be made from other colors. NEXT Return to Main Page Page Tertiary Colors Secondary Colors

13 Primary Colors Can you see the primary colors in this painting by Piet Mondrian? What shapes did Mondrian use in this painting? Boogie Woogie By Piet Mondrian Return to MainThe Color Wheel Page The Color WheelThe Color Wheel Secondary Colors Tertiary Colors

14 Secondary Colors The secondary colors are orange, green, and purple. Secondary colors are made from mixing the primary colors. Primary Colors Return to Main Page Page Tertiary Colors

15 Mixing primary and secondary colors creates tertiary colors. Tertiary colors include: 1)Red-Violet 2)Blue-Violet 3)Blue-Green 4)Yellow Green 5)Red-Orange 6)Yellow-Orange On the color wheel, the tertiary colors are located between the primary and secondary colors they are made from. Tertiary Colors Secondary Colors Return to Main Page Page Primary Colors

16 Warm Colors The warm colors are red, orange, yellow, and anything in between. They are called warm because they remind you of the sun or fire. Warm colors seem to come out at you in space. Cool Colors NEXT Return to Main Page Page

17 Warm Colors In The Fighting Temeraire by William Turner, the warm colors of the sunset give a feeling of brightness and heat. Look at the red spreading from the setting sun and the deep golden glow on the water. If you're feeling cold, looking at colors like these can actually make you feel warmer! The Fighting Temeraire by William Turner Return to MainThe Color Wheel Page The Color WheelThe Color Wheel Cool Colors

18 The Cool colors are blue, green, purple and anything in between. They are called cool because they remind you of the earth or a cool creek. Cool colors seem to recede from you in space. Warm Colors NEXT Return to Main Page Page

19 Cool Colors In this painting by Claude Monet, The Walk, Lady with a Parasol, the cool colors of the ground and sky contributes to the peaceful feeling of the painting. Imagine how different the painting would look with a bright red skyit might seem more exciting or energetic than restful. The Walk, Lady with a Parasol by Claude Monet Return to Main Page Page Warm Colors

20 Neutrals Neutrals don't usually show up on the color wheel. Neutrals include black, white, gray, and sometimes brown and beige. They are sometimes called earth tones. There are a few different ways to make neutrals. You can blend black and white to make gray. You can create brown in two waysby blending two complementary colors together or by blending all three primary colors together. Snow in New York by Robert Henri In Snow in New York, Robert Henri uses many different neutrals. You can see a few glimpses of red paint, but the overall effect is of natural browns, whites and grays--like those you might see in rocks, sand, dirt, or clay. Return to Main Page

21 Monochromatic Colors A monochromatic scheme consists of different values (tints and shades) of a single color. An example of a monochrome color scheme could include any color mixed with white or black. The example above is a green monochromatic color scheme. A shade of green is made by mixing green and black. A tint of green is made by mixing green and white. Return to Main Page Color Schemes

22 Analogous Colors These colors are located next to each other on the wheel, such as: Blue, Blue-green, Green Red, Red-Orange, and Orange Analogous colors are sometimes called harmonious colors. NEXT Return to Main Page Color Schemes

23 Analogous Colors Orange, yellow-orange, and yellow are also examples of analogous colors. They are blended nicely in Sunflowers, a painting by Vincent Van Gogh. How do you know that these colors are closely related? They share a coloreach of them contains some yellow. Sunflowers By Vincent Van Gogh Return to Main Page Color Schemes

24 Complementary Colors Complementary colors are the colors that are directly across from each other on the color wheel Blue & Orange Red & Green Purple & Yellow NEXT Return to Main Page Color Schemes

25 Complementary Colors Red and green are an example of complementary colors. Look at the painting Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose by John Singer Sargent. The reddish-pink color of the flowers really stands out against the green background. Imagine if Sargent had painted all yellow or blue flowers instead. They would just blend in with the green (ho-hum). Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose by John Singer Sargent Return to Main Page Color Schemes

26 Split-Complement Color Scheme A split-compliment color scheme includes a main color and the two colors on each side of its complementary (opposite) color on the color wheel. An example of a split- compliment color scheme could be green, violet-red, and red- orange. Return to Main Page Color Schemes

27 Double Split-Complement Color Scheme A double split-complement (also called tetradic) uses two pairs of complements, one space apart on the color wheel. An example is red, green, orange, and blue. Return to Main Page Color Schemes

28 Triadic Color Scheme A triadic color scheme uses colors at the points of an equilateral triangle (three colors spaced equally on the color wheel). These are sometimes called balanced colors. An example of a triadic color scheme could be red, blue, and yellow; green, orange, and purple, etc. Return to Main Page Color Schemes

29 The Meaning of Color Click on a color to learn about its meaning. Black White Return to Main Page

30 The Meaning of Color-Red Red is the color of fire. It is associated with energy, war, danger, strength, power, determination and love. Red is a very emotionally intense color. It enhances human metabolism, increases respiration rate, and raises blood pressure. It has very high visibility, which is why stop signs, stoplights, and fire equipment are usually painted red. It is a color found in many national flags. Red brings text and images to the foreground. Use it as an accent color to stimulate people to make quick decisions; it is a perfect color for 'Buy Now' or 'Click Here' buttons on Internet banners and websites. Red is widely used to indicate danger (high voltage signs, traffic lights). Return to Meaning of Color Main Page

31 The Meaning of Color-Orange Orange combines the energy of red and the happiness of yellow. It is associated with joy, sunshine, and the tropics. Orange represents enthusiasm, fascination, happiness, creativity, determination, attraction, success, and encouragement. To the human eye, orange is a very hot color, so it gives the sensation of heat. Nevertheless, orange is not as aggressive as red. Orange increases oxygen supply to the brain, produces an invigorating effect, and stimulates mental activity. As a citrus color, orange is associated with healthy food and stimulates appetite. Orange is the color of fall and harvest. Orange has very high visibility, so you can use it to catch attention and highlight the most important elements of your design. Return to Meaning of Color Main Page

32 The Meaning of Color-Yellow Yellow is the color of sunshine. It's associated with joy, happiness, intellect, and energy. Yellow produces a warming effect, arouses cheerfulness, stimulates mental activity, and generates muscle energy. Yellow is often associated with food. Bright, pure yellow is an attention getter, which is the reason taxicabs are painted this color. When overused, yellow may have a disturbing effect; it is known that babies cry more in yellow rooms. Yellow is seen before other colors when placed against black; this combination is often used to issue a warning. Use yellow to evoke pleasant, cheerful feelings. Yellow is very effective for attracting attention, so use it to highlight the most important elements of your design. Shades of yellow are visually unappealing because they loose cheerfulness and become dingy. Return to Meaning of Color Main Page

33 The Meaning of Color-Green Green is the color of nature. It symbolizes growth, harmony, and freshness. Green has strong emotional correspondence with safety. Dark green is also commonly associated with money. Green has great healing power. It is the most restful color for the human eye; it can improve vision. Green suggests stability and endurance. Sometimes green denotes lack of experience; for example, a 'greenhorn' is a novice. Green, as opposed to red, means safety; it is the color of free passage in road traffic. Green is directly related to nature, so you can use it to promote 'green' products. Dull, darker green is commonly associated with money, the financial world, banking, and Wall Street. Dark green is associated with ambition, greed, and jealousy. Olive green is the traditional color of peace. Return to Meaning of Color Main Page

34 The Meaning of Color-Blue Blue is the color of the sky and sea. It symbolizes trust, loyalty, wisdom, confidence, intelligence, and truth. Blue is considered beneficial to the mind and body. It slows human metabolism and produces a calming effect. Blue is strongly associated with tranquility and calmness. Blue is used to promote products and services related to cleanliness (water purification filters, cleaning liquids), air and sky (airlines, airports, air conditioners), water and sea (sea voyages, mineral water). When used together with warm colors like yellow or red, blue can create high-impact, vibrant designs; for example, blue-yellow-red is a perfect color scheme for a superhero. Return to Meaning of Color Main Page

35 The Meaning of Color-Purple Purple combines the stability of blue and the energy of red. Purple is associated with royalty. It symbolizes power, nobility, luxury, and ambition. It conveys wealth and extravagance. Purple is associated with wisdom, dignity, independence, creativity, mystery, and magic. According to surveys, almost 75 percent of pre-adolescent children prefer purple to all other colors. Purple is a very rare color in nature; some people consider it to be artificial. Return to Meaning of Color Main Page

36 The Meaning of Color-White White is associated with light, goodness, and innocence. It is considered to be the color of perfection. White means safety, purity, and cleanliness. As opposed to black, white usually has a positive connotation. White can represent a successful beginning. White is associated with hospitals, doctors, and sterility. White is also often associated with low weight, low-fat food, and dairy products. Return to Meaning of Color Main Page

37 The Meaning of Color-Black Black is associated with power, elegance, death, evil, and mystery. Black is a mysterious color associated with fear and the unknown (black holes). Black denotes strength and authority; it is considered to be a very formal, elegant, and prestigious color (black tie event). Black gives the feeling of perspective and depth. When designing for a gallery of art or photography, you can use a black or gray background to make the other colors stand out. Black contrasts well with bright colors. Combined with red or orange – other very powerful colors – black gives a very aggressive color scheme. Return to Meaning of Color Main Page

38 Advanced Color Theory Color An element of art which has three properties. 1) Hue, which is the name of a color. For example, red, yellow, blue are hues. 2) Intensity, which refers to the brightness and purity of a color. For example, bright red or dull red. 3) Value, which refers to the lightness or darkness of a color. Click on the Links Above to Proceed Return to Main Page

39 Hue Hue refers to the name of a color. For example red, blue, and purple are hues. Return to Main Page Return to Advanced Color Theory

40 Intensity Intensity refers to the brightness or dullness of a color. An example is bright red (or dull red). When a hue is strong and bright, it is said to be high in intensity. When a color is faint, dull and gray, it is said to be low in intensity. Intensities of Green Return to Main Page Return to Advanced Color Theory

41 Value Value is the lightness or darkness of a color. You can obtain different values by adding black or white to a color. A light color is called a tint of the original hue. For example, pink is a tint of red. To make a color darker in value, black is added. A dark color is called a shade of the original hue. Maroon is a shade of red. Here is an example of a value scale that has values ranging from the darkest dark, to the whitest white. Return to Main Page Return to Advanced Color Theory

42 Can you identify the color scheme in the image below? Is it a…. Red, yellow and blue - may not be created by mixing other colors. They result from the mixing of two of the primary colors. Orange, green, and purple. Colors ranging between blue-violet and yellow-green on the color wheel. Colors ranging between yellow to red-violet on the color wheel. Tints (color + white) and shades (color +black) of a single color. Colors that are opposite of each other on the color wheel. Analogous colors Analogous colors are three colors that are right next to each other on the color wheel. Primary Colors Secondary Colors Warm Colors Cool Colors Monochromatic Colors Complementary Colors Analogous Colors Click the Mouse Anywhere to Reveal the Answer NEXT Return to Main Page

43 Can you identify the color scheme in the image below? Is it a…. Red, yellow and blue - may not be created by mixing other colors. They result from the mixing of two of the primary colors. Orange, green, and purple. Colors ranging between blue-violet and yellow-green on the color wheel. Colors ranging between yellow to red-violet on the color wheel. Tints (color + white) and shades (color +black) of a single color. Colors that are opposite of each other on the color wheel. Analogous colors Analogous colors are three colors that are right next to each other on the color wheel. Primary Colors Secondary Colors Warm Colors Cool Colors Monochromatic Colors Complementary Colors Analogous Colors Click the Mouse Anywhere to Reveal the Answer NEXT Return to Main Page

44 Can you identify the color scheme in the image below? Is it a…. Red, yellow and blue - may not be created by mixing other colors. They result from the mixing of two of the primary colors. Orange, green, and purple. Colors ranging between blue-violet and yellow-green on the color wheel. Colors ranging between yellow to red-violet on the color wheel. Tints (color + white) and shades (color +black) of a single color. Colors that are opposite of each other on the color wheel. Analogous colors Analogous colors are three colors that are right next to each other on the color wheel. Primary Colors Secondary Colors Warm Colors Cool Colors Monochromatic Colors Complementary Colors Analogous Colors Click the Mouse Anywhere to Reveal the Answer NEXT Return to Main Page

45 Can you identify the color scheme in the image below? Is it a…. Red, yellow and blue - may not be created by mixing other colors. They result from the mixing of two of the primary colors. Orange, green, and purple. Colors ranging between blue-violet and yellow-green on the color wheel. Colors ranging between yellow to red-violet on the color wheel. Tints (color + white) and shades (color +black) of a single color. Colors that are opposite of each other on the color wheel. Analogous colors Analogous colors are three colors that are right next to each other on the color wheel. Primary Colors Secondary Colors Warm Colors Cool Colors Monochromatic Colors Complementary Colors Analogous Colors Click the Mouse Anywhere to Reveal the Answer NEXT Return to Main Page

46 Can you identify the color scheme in the image below? Is it a…. Red, yellow and blue - may not be created by mixing other colors. They result from the mixing of two of the primary colors. Orange, green, and purple. Colors ranging between blue-violet and yellow-green on the color wheel. Colors ranging between yellow to red-violet on the color wheel. Tints (color + white) and shades (color +black) of a single color. Colors that are opposite of each other on the color wheel. Analogous colors Analogous colors are three colors that are right next to each other on the color wheel. Primary Colors Secondary Colors Warm Colors Cool Colors Monochromatic Colors Complementary Colors Analogous Colors Click the Mouse Anywhere to Reveal the Answer NEXT Return to Main Page

47 Can you identify the color scheme in the image below? Is it a…. Red, yellow and blue - may not be created by mixing other colors. They result from the mixing of two of the primary colors. Orange, green, and purple. Colors ranging between blue-violet and yellow-green on the color wheel. Colors ranging between yellow to red-violet on the color wheel. Tints (color + white) and shades (color +black) of a single color. Colors that are opposite of each other on the color wheel. Analogous colors Analogous colors are three colors that are right next to each other on the color wheel. Primary Colors Secondary Colors Warm Colors Cool Colors Monochromatic Colors Complementary Colors Analogous Colors Click the Mouse Anywhere to Reveal the Answer NEXT Return to Main Page

48 Can you identify the color scheme in the image below? Is it a…. Red, yellow and blue - may not be created by mixing other colors. They result from the mixing of two of the primary colors. Orange, green, and purple. Colors ranging between blue-violet and yellow-green on the color wheel. Colors ranging between yellow to red-violet on the color wheel. Tints (color + white) and shades (color +black) of a single color. Colors that are opposite of each other on the color wheel. Analogous colors are three colors that are right next to each other on the color wheel. Primary Colors Secondary Colors Warm Colors Cool Colors Monochromatic Colors Complementary Colors Analogous Colors Click the Mouse Anywhere to Reveal the Answer The End Return to Main Page

49 Resources Images have been borrowed from the following websites… Fields in a Rising Storm by Vincent Van Gogh –www.factmonster.com The Fighting Temeraire by William Turner –www.all-art.org Sunflowers by Vincent Van Gogh –www.allartclassic.com The Walk, Lady with a Parasol by Claude Monet –www.latifm.com Snow in New York by Robert Henri –www.usc.edu Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose by John Singer Sargent –www.artcyclopedia.com Boogie Woogie by Piet Mondrian –www.paintings.name/piet-mondrian-biography.php Return to Main Page Weblinks

50 Web Links Clickable Color Wheel –Basic Color Schemes Color Wheel Carmines Introduction to Color –This site uses fun rhymes to explain what primary, secondary, and intermediate colors are. Mix colors before moving to another page and complete a quiz on color wheels. Sanford's ArtEdventures with Carmine Chameleon –During this online adventure kids can learn about the color wheel, primary, secondary, and intermediate colors. Students also can find out what colors create these secondary and tertiary colors. Includes interactive game for mixing colors online. Color Factory –Visit the online color factory for fun activities. Select the "Sorting Sector" and practice your knowledge of the color wheel by selecting and placing right colors into the circle. Go to the "Mixing Room" and create secondary and intermediate colors using online mixing machine then go to the "Messy Area" to paint pictures. Make a Splash with Color –Learn about color. Find out why and how we see colors. Discover how hue, saturation, and brightness effect an image. Click on the "Combining All Three" link to go to the part of the site with interactive color wheel for practicing use of hue and saturation. The Science of Light: Made from Dots –Read how cyan, magenta, and yellow colored dots are mixed together to produce images on paper. Click on the "Go" link and use three swatches to mix and match colors. The World of Color –Here are interactive applets that demonstrate how colors interact, mix with each other, and affect images. Additive Color –Learn what color addition is and how it works. Use spotlights to practice mixing colors. Subtractive Color –Find out how color subtraction works and mix some colors. Return to Main Page Resource List


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