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BIOTECHNOLOGY CONCEPTS IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: AN ANALYSIS Josh Brown and Drew Abney Illinois State University.

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Presentation on theme: "BIOTECHNOLOGY CONCEPTS IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: AN ANALYSIS Josh Brown and Drew Abney Illinois State University."— Presentation transcript:

1 BIOTECHNOLOGY CONCEPTS IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: AN ANALYSIS Josh Brown and Drew Abney Illinois State University

2 Overview Historical foundation of biotech in technology education Taxonomy (Wells, 1994) Analysis of articles Interview analysis Future directions

3 Biotechnology in Technology Education Standard 15 (ITEA, 2000) Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use agricultural and related biotechnologies.

4 Biotechnology What is biotechnology? Standards for Technological Literacy (2000) Any technique that uses living organisms, or parts of organisms, to make or modify products, improve plants or animals, or develop microorganisms for specific purposes (p. 149)

5 Questions What does this mean? How much biotechnology is appropriate? How should biotechnology be included in secondary classrooms? Who teachers biotechnology?

6 Delphi Study (Scott, Washer, and Wright, 2006) 45 competencies Recommendations Preservice teachers should be able to deliver content Further research needed isolationist method revised Curriculum guide should be developed to help implement biotechnology in technology education

7 Biotechnology Taxonometric Structure Wells (1994, 1995) Developed structure for biotechnology study in schools. Technology educators can gauge the accuracy of the selected biotechnology activity by whether or not it adheres to the accepted definition (Wells, 1995, pg. 12) More than just TE, but all professions

8 Wells (1995) Categories Bioprocessing Foundations in biotechnology Genetic engineering Agriculture Biochemistry Medicine Environment Bioethics

9 Our Study Identified biotechnology articles (22) Content Analysis Any content connection to biotechnology Identified specific subgroup Not evaluating quality Organized findings by frequency

10 Findings

11 Findings - Bioethics

12 Example Baird (2002) – Technological Literacy and Human cloning Importance of students ability to use, manage and understand the biotechnology of cloning Futures wheel and highlight focus on ethical component. Connections How do we clone? What biological concepts are involved in cloning?

13 Findings - Environmental

14 Example Reed (2004) – A paradigm shift: Biomimicry Nature as model, measure, and mentor Activity – Design for disassembly Create a product considering Pre-life Useful life End-life Bio connections Material properties Make models of mimicry

15 Themes Present Bioethics Environment Analysis of technology Impacts

16 Missing Biology content Scientific problems Collaborative map

17 Question What content knowledge and skills are needed by students interested in biotechnology fields?

18 Interviews Education and Research E.L. – Professor – Molecular Biologist J.S. – Professor – Biology Industry D.P. – Orthotist and Prothetist M.S. – Director of Technical Services – Optometry

19 Interviews (cont) E.L. – Professor – Molecular Biologist Very important to learn the technical aspects rather than just discuss the social impacts For high school student – learn the basics of biology…

20 Interviews (cont) J.S. – Professor – Biology Teaches a college-level biotechnology course Bioethics is very important Basic understanding of biology …But certainly, high school is a key time for students to decide what career direction they want to go, and unless they get hands-on experience….you know, what they see on TV is all they get…

21 Interviews (cont) D.P. – Orthotist and Prothetist Requires a basic understanding of the Sciences …There is definitely a psychosocial aspect to my job… …There is a very large, open-ended problem solving aspect to my job… Believes that: 1. social impacts are very important… 2. discipline integration at the secondary level is important…

22 Interviews (cont) M.S. – Director of Technical Services – Optometry Requires a basic understanding of the Sciences Specific topics (bioprocessing, medical bio- technology) are important to spark interests in students. Integration of disciplines

23 Moving forward Biology content Better understanding Thorough integration Collaboration Science teachers Technology teachers Math teachers Research

24 Examples Models of integration Dunham, T., Wells, J., & White, K. (2002). Photobioreactor: Biotechnology for the Technology Education Classroom. Technology Teacher, 62(2), 7 Ernst, J., & Busby, J. (2009). Hydroponics: Content and Rationale. Technology Teacher, 68(6), 20-24

25 Articles Baird, S. (2002). Technological Literacy and Human Cloning. Technology Teacher, 62(3), 19. Baird, S. (2007). Sustainable Design: The Next Industrial Revolution?. Technology Teacher, 67(4), Baird, S. (2007). Designer Babies: Eugenics Repackaged or Consumer Options?. Technology Teacher, 66(7), Baird, S. (2008). Offshore Oil Drilling: Buying Energy Independence or Buying Time?. Technology Teacher, 68(3), Baird, S. (2008). Regenerative Medicine: A Growing Future. Technology Teacher, 67(8), Childress, V. (2002). Promising Alternatives in Agri-technology: Aquaponics. Technology Teacher, 62(4), 17. Childress, V. (2007). Robotic Surgery. Technology Teacher, 66(5), Childress, V. (2008). Energy Perspective: Is Hydroelectricity Green?. Technology Teacher, 68(4), 4-9. Deal, W., & Baird, S. (2003). Genetically Modified Foods: A Growing Need. Technology Teacher, 62(7), 18. Dunham, T., Wells, J., & White, K. (2002). Photobioreactor: Biotechnology for the Technology Education Classroom. Technology Teacher, 62(2), 7 Ernst, J., & Busby, J. (2009). Hydroponics: Content and Rationale. Technology Teacher, 68(6), Fisher, D. (2008). Evildoer or Do-Gooder: Getting the Goods on Ozone. Technology Teacher, 68(1), Goel, L. (2006). Engineering a Microfluidic Device. Technology Teacher, 66(2), 7-8. Goel, L. (2006). Design Brief: Engineering DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid). Technology Teacher, 66(4), 7-8 Haynie, W., & Greenberg, D. (2001). Genetic Disorders: An Integrated Curriculum Project. Technology Teacher, 60(6), 10. Katsioloudis, P. (2009). Biomedical Technology: Supporting Movement. Technology Teacher, 68(5), Kennedy, I., & Waggoner, T. (2003). Water Pollution Scrubber Activity Simulates Pollution Control Devices. Technology Teacher, 63(2), 7. Reed, P. (2003). Telemedicine: The Practice of Medicine at a Distance. Technology Teacher, 62(5), 17. Reed, P. (2003). A Paradigm Shift: Biomimicry. Technology Teacher, 63(4), Reed, P. (2004). Bioprospecting. Technology Teacher, 64(4), Ritz, J. (2006). Resources in Technology:Turfgrass Production. Technology Teacher, 65(6), Roman, H. (2009). Wind Farm Challenge. Technology Teacher, 68(5),


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