Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter 22 The Demand for Money. Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. 22-2 Velocity of Money and Equation of Exchange.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter 22 The Demand for Money. Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. 22-2 Velocity of Money and Equation of Exchange."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 22 The Demand for Money

2 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Velocity of Money and Equation of Exchange

3 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Quantity Theory Velocity fairly constant in short run Aggregate output at full-employment level Changes in money supply affect only the price level Movement in the price level results solely from change in the quantity of money

4 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Quantity Theory of Money Demand

5 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. 22-5

6 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Keyness Liquidity Preference Theory Transactions Motive Precautionary Motive Speculative Motive Distinguishes between real and nominal quantities of money

7 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved The Three Motives

8 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved The Three Motives (contd)

9 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved There is an opportunity cost and benefit to holding money The transaction component of the demand for money is negatively related to the level of interest rates

10 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Precautionary Demand Similar to transactions demand As interest rates rise, the opportunity cost of holding precautionary balances rises The precautionary demand for money is negatively related to interest rates

11 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Speculative Demand Implication of no diversification Only partial explanations developed further Risk averse people will diversify Did not explain why money is held as a store of wealth

12 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Friedmans Modern Quantity Theory of Money

13 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Variables in the Money Demand Function Permanent income (average long-run income) is stable, the demand for money will not fluctuate much with business cycle movements Wealth can be held in bonds, equity and goods; incentives for holding these are represented by the expected return on each of these assets relative to the expected return on money The expected return on money is influenced by: The services proved by banks on deposits The interest payment on money balances

14 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Differences between Keyness and Friedmans Model Friedman Includes alternative assets to money Viewed money and goods as substitutes The expected return on money is not constant; however, r b – r m does stay constant as interest rates rise Interest rates have little effect on the demand for money

15 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Differences between Keyness and Friedmans Model (contd) Friedman (contd) The demand for money is stable velocity is predictable Money is the primary determinant of aggregate spending

16 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Empirical Evidence Interest rates and money demand Consistent evidence of the interest sensitivity of the demand for money Little evidence of liquidity trap Stability of money demand Prior to 1970, evidence strongly supported stability of the money demand function Since 1973, instability of the money demand function has caused velocity to be harder to predict Implications for how monetary policy should be conducted


Download ppt "Chapter 22 The Demand for Money. Copyright © 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. 22-2 Velocity of Money and Equation of Exchange."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google