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Chapter 22 The Demand for Money. 22-2 Quantity Theory of Money Velocity V = (P × Y) / M Equation of Exchange M V = P Y (an identity) Quantity Theory of.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 22 The Demand for Money. 22-2 Quantity Theory of Money Velocity V = (P × Y) / M Equation of Exchange M V = P Y (an identity) Quantity Theory of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 22 The Demand for Money

2 22-2 Quantity Theory of Money Velocity V = (P × Y) / M Equation of Exchange M V = P Y (an identity) Quantity Theory of Money 1. Irving Fisher (1911): V is fairly constant in the short run (determined by the institutional and technological features). 2. Nominal income, PY, determined by M 3. Classicals assume Y fairly constant (flexible p and w, and full employment) 4. P determined by M

3 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved 22-3 Quantity Theory of Money Quantity Theory of Money Demand M =(1/V) PY M d = k PY Implication: interest rates not important to M d

4 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved 22-4 Change in Velocity from Year to Year: 1915–2002

5 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved 22-5 Cambridge Approach Is velocity constant? 1.Classicals thought V constant because didnt have good data 2.After Great Depression, economists realized velocity far from constant

6 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved 22-6 Keyness Liquidity Preference Theory 3 Motives Transactions motiverelated to Y - Since money is a medium of exchange it can be used to carry out everyday transactions. Keynes believed that these transactions were proportional to income. 2.Precautionary motiverelated to Y - People hold money as a cushion against an unexpected need. This motive is determined primarily by the level of transactions that they expect to make in the future and that these transactions are proportional to income. 3.Speculative motive - Since money is also a store of value, Keynes called this reason for holding money the speculative motive. Keynes divided the assets that can be used to store wealth into two categories: money (that pays no interest rate) and bonds (that pays positive interest rates). - Money demand is negatively related to i

7 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved 22-7 Keyness Liquidity Preference Theory Liquidity Preference (real money balances) M d = f(i, Y) P–+ Keyness conclusion that the demand for money is related to income and interest rates is a major departure from Fishers view of money demand.

8 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved 22-8 Keyness Liquidity Preference Theory Implication: Velocity not constant P1 = M d f(i,Y) Multiply both sides by Y and substitute in M = M d PYY V = = Mf(i,Y) 1. i, f(i,Y), V 2. Change in expectations of future i, change f(i,Y) and V changes

9 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved 22-9 Baumol-Tobin Model of Transactions Demand Assumptions 1.Income of $1000 each month 2.2 assets: money and bonds If keep all income in cash 1.Yearly income = $12,000 2.Average money balances = $1000/2 3.Velocity = $12,000/$500 = 24 Keep only 1/2 payment in cash 1.Yearly income = $12,000 2.Average money balances = $500/2 = $250 3.Velocity = $12,000/$250 = 48 Trade-off of keeping less cash 1.Income gain = i $500/2 2.Increased transactions costs Conclusion: Higher is i and income gain from holding bonds, less likely to hold cash: Therefore i, M d

10 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Cash Balance in Baumol-Tobin Model

11 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Baumol-Tobin Model Suppose that the cost of a banking transaction (trip) is b and that the interest rate is i. Total cost = Forgone interest + cost of trips

12 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Baumol-Tobin Model The optimal value of n, denoted n* can be calculated as follows: FOC: n can be solved as:

13 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Baumol-Tobin Model Therefore, the optimal money demand is: The model predicts that the demand for money will increase in less than proportion to the volume of transactions (income), that is, there are economies of scale in money holding for the individual. Also, demand for money depends on interest rate.

14 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Baumol-Tobin Model Take logarithm: Income elasticity of money demand: or, increasing returns to the scale Note: classical model,,income elasticity is 1.

15 22-15 Precautionary and Speculative M d Precautionary Demand Similar tradeoff to Baumol-Tobin framework 1. Benefits of precautionary balances 2. Opportunity cost of interest foregone Conclusion: i, opportunity cost, hold less precautionary balances, M d Speculative Demand Problems with Keyness framework: Hold all bonds or all money: no diversification Tobin Model: 1. People want high R e, but low risk 2. As i, hold more bonds and less M, but still diversify and hold M Problem with Tobin model: No speculative demand because T-bills have no risk (like money) but have higher return

16 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Friedmans Modern Quantity Theory (1956) The demand for money must be influenced by the same factors that influence the demand fro any asset. The demand for money therefore should be a function of the resources available to individuals (their wealth) and the expected returns on other assets relative to the expected return on money.

17 22-17 Friedmans Modern Quantity Theory Implication of 3: M d Y = f(Y P ) V = Pf(Y P ) Since relationship of Y and Y P predictable, 4 implies V is predictable: Get Q- theory view that change in M leads to predictable changes in nominal income, PY Theory of asset demand: M d function of wealth (Y P ) and relative R e of other assets M d = f(Y P, r b – r m, r e – r m, e – r m ) P+––– Differences from Keynesian Theories 1.Other assets besides money and bonds: equities and real goods 2.Real goods as alternative asset to money implies M has direct effects on spending 3.r m not constant: r b, r m, r b – r m unchanged, so M d unchanged: i.e., interest rates have little effect on M d 4.M d is a stable function

18 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Friedmans Modern Quantity Theory Even though velocity is no longer assumed to be constant, the money supply continues to be the primary determinant of nominal incomes in the quantity theory of money. In Keynesian liquidity preference function, i and V are procyclical, while in Friedmans quantity theory, income (Y) and V are procyclical.

19 © 2004 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved Empirical Evidence on Money Demand Interest Sensitivity of Money Demand Is sensitive, but no liquidity trap Stability of Money Demand 1.M1 demand stable till 1973, unstable after 2.Most likely source of instability is financial innovation 3.Cast doubts on money targets


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