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DIOCESAN STUDENT PROTECTION INSERVICE January 2013 onwards.

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Presentation on theme: "DIOCESAN STUDENT PROTECTION INSERVICE January 2013 onwards."— Presentation transcript:

1 DIOCESAN STUDENT PROTECTION INSERVICE January 2013 onwards

2 For many young people, the school is the one stable human entity that can provide hope for the future and a secure and meaningful community. Sue Doran

3 Rockhampton DCEO acknowledges the great work in this area already carried out by its staff. The following in service package meets government legislation requirements and will enable staff to be better informed in this area. Rockhampton DCEO acknowledges the great work in this area already carried out by its staff. The following in service package meets government legislation requirements and will enable staff to be better informed in this area.

4 This power point provides information relating to the identification of child abuse. This power point provides information relating to the identification of child abuse. Child abuse is a sensitive topic and may raise issues for some people. Please be aware of your own sensitivities. You may need to have a break during the session or seek additional support.

5 SECTION 1 Introduction Why Student Protection?

6 Why Student Protection? LEGISLATION Child Protection Act 1999 (QLD) Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian Act 2000 (QLD) The Education (Accreditation of Non-State Schools) Regulation, 2001 Education (QCT) Act 2005 Education (General Provisions) Act 2006 and Regulation 2006(QLD) The Education and Training Amendment Act 2011 The Education Legislation Amendment Act 2012

7 Why Student Protection? Catholic Education, Diocese of Rockhampton is committed to the implementation of student protection strategies and procedures that are intended to prevent harm to students, and to respond quickly and effectively when they suspect or are informed of any type of harm to a student caused by any person. Catholic Education, Diocese of Rockhampton is committed to the implementation of student protection strategies and procedures that are intended to prevent harm to students, and to respond quickly and effectively when they suspect or are informed of any type of harm to a student caused by any person.

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10 SECTION 2 Towards Healing/Historical Matters

11 Towards Healing is a document and process of the Catholic Church which is the Churchs response to dealing with allegations of abuse; it was first instituted in 1996 and revised in 2002 and Towards Healing is a document and process of the Catholic Church which is the Churchs response to dealing with allegations of abuse; it was first instituted in 1996 and revised in 2002 and Towards Healing offers a pastoral response and listens to and documents the complaint. Official complaints can then be registered and responded to in accordance with the Towards Healing process. Towards Healing offers a pastoral response and listens to and documents the complaint. Official complaints can then be registered and responded to in accordance with the Towards Healing process. Towards Healing deals mainly with historical abuse cases but also with any cases involving current clergy or religious.Criminal investigations are managed by the police. Towards Healing deals mainly with historical abuse cases but also with any cases involving current clergy or religious.Criminal investigations are managed by the police. Rockhampton DCEO will hand matters over to the appropriate authorities and/or conduct its own investigations of employees using their defined policies and procedures for all staff. Rockhampton DCEO will hand matters over to the appropriate authorities and/or conduct its own investigations of employees using their defined policies and procedures for all staff. Towards Healing

12 If schools / colleges receive phone calls regarding allegations of abuse from the past, they should always respond pastorally. If possible obtain contact details of the person involved and let them know someone will contact them who can help and advise. Pass on the information to the AD:Schools and /or Student Protection Co-ordinator immediately.

13 SECTION 3 Definitions & Indicators

14 Harm to students can take many forms and may be caused by the actions of: a) a fellow student; b) A volunteer whose presence in the school has been authorised; c) someone at a distance from the immediate school community such as parent/caregiver, relative, neighbour friend of family or stranger; d) the student himself or herself. e) a member of the school staff (or other staff member of DCE), religious, priest, or lay person, whether teacher, ancillary staff or connected to the school in some administrative or pastoral capacity.

15 Physical Abuse Physical abuse is commonly characterised by physical injury resulting from practices such as punching, beating, shaking, biting, burning or otherwise harming a child.

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17 Emotional Abuse Emotional abuse tends to be a chronic behavioural pattern directed at the child/young person whereby their self esteem and social competence is undermined or eroded over time. A child/young person can also experience emotional abuse by being exposed to a dysfunctional environment which includes domestic violence.

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19 Neglect Neglect is characterised by the failure to provide for the child/young persons basic needs. This can occur through direct and deliberate action or by omission or deliberate inaction to care for the child/young person.

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21 New Legislation Legislation was passed by the Queensland Parliament in late 2011 to improve the protection of Queensland students. The initial change commenced at the start of Term Legislation was passed by the Queensland Parliament in late 2011 to improve the protection of Queensland students. The initial change commenced at the start of Term

22 New Legislation The new law requires all Queensland school staff to report concerns that a student had been sexually abused by any person. This includes the requirement to report Historical sexual abuse even if it is identified asalready been dealt with. The new law requires all Queensland school staff to report concerns that a student had been sexually abused by any person. This includes the requirement to report Historical sexual abuse even if it is identified asalready been dealt with.

23 The Education Legislation Amendment Act 2012 In June 2012, the Parliament deferred implementation of that Section of the ETLA 2011 relating to the reporting of likely sexual abuse until legislation could be passed to restore the Parliaments original intention that failing to report likely sexual abuse would be dealt with by employing authorities, which would consider taking disciplinary action in appropriate cases. In June 2012, the Parliament deferred implementation of that Section of the ETLA 2011 relating to the reporting of likely sexual abuse until legislation could be passed to restore the Parliaments original intention that failing to report likely sexual abuse would be dealt with by employing authorities, which would consider taking disciplinary action in appropriate cases. This was achieved when the Parliament passed the Education Legislation Amendment Act 2012 on 14 November This was achieved when the Parliament passed the Education Legislation Amendment Act 2012 on 14 November The commencement date of this legislation will be 29 January The commencement date of this legislation will be 29 January 2013.

24 Definition of Child Sexual Abuse: Sexual abuse occurs when an adult, stronger child or adolescent uses their power or authority to involve a child in sexual activity. Sexual abuse can be physical, verbal or emotional. It may involve physical contact with another person, but not necessarily so.

25 What is Sexual Abuse? The Act provides the following guidance: The Act provides the following guidance: Sexual abuse, in relation to a relevant person, includes sexual behaviour involving the relevant person and another person in the following circumstances –Sexual abuse, in relation to a relevant person, includes sexual behaviour involving the relevant person and another person in the following circumstances – (a)the other person bribes, coerces, exploits, threatens or is violent toward the relevant person; (b)the relevant person has less power than the other person; (c)there is a significant disparity between the relevant person and the other person in intellectual capacity or maturity. Education and Training Legislation Amendment Act 2011 S.364

26 Definition of Child Sexual Abuse: Sexual abuse can include: kissing or holding a child in a sexual manner exposing a sexual body part to a child having sexual relations with a child under 16 years of age talking in a sexually explicit way that is not age or developmentally appropriate making obscene phone calls or remarks to a child sending obscene mobile text messages or s to a child

27 Definition of Child Sexual Abuse: fondling a child in a sexual manner fondling a child in a sexual manner persistently intruding on a child's privacy persistently intruding on a child's privacy penetrating the child's vagina or anus by penis, finger or any other object penetrating the child's vagina or anus by penis, finger or any other object oral sex oral sex rape rape incest incest showing pornographic films, magazines or photographs to a child showing pornographic films, magazines or photographs to a child having a child pose or perform in a sexual manner having a child pose or perform in a sexual manner forcing a child to watch a sexual act forcing a child to watch a sexual act child prostitution child prostitution Source: Queensland Government, Child Safety Services

28 Indicators of Child Sexual Abuse A child may say things, do things or exhibit physical signs that are clues to sexual abuse, even if they do not disclose clear information.

29 Sexual abuse – What a child might say or do Discloses sexual abuse Discloses sexual abuse Sophisticated or unusual sexual behaviour or knowledge Sophisticated or unusual sexual behaviour or knowledge Constants complaints of headaches and/or abdominal pains Constants complaints of headaches and/or abdominal pains Difficulties at school or change in level of performance at school Difficulties at school or change in level of performance at school Sleep disorders Sleep disorders Persistent habits such as sucking, biting or rocking Persistent habits such as sucking, biting or rocking Inhibition to play Inhibition to play Serious difficulties relating to peers and/or adults Serious difficulties relating to peers and/or adults Self-destructive behaviour Self-destructive behaviour

30 Marked unexplained (not linked to changes to the environment or developmental stages) changes in the following; Marked unexplained (not linked to changes to the environment or developmental stages) changes in the following; Fears, nightmares, sleep difficulties, headaches, angry, daydream/withdrawn, sad, struggles at school, changes friends, wets or soils themselves, behaves younger, frequent stomach and other pains, eager to please, appears to tell stories known not to be true, sexualized play/with self and or others. Fears, nightmares, sleep difficulties, headaches, angry, daydream/withdrawn, sad, struggles at school, changes friends, wets or soils themselves, behaves younger, frequent stomach and other pains, eager to please, appears to tell stories known not to be true, sexualized play/with self and or others. Some possible indicators signs:The key is to look for bunches of these not focus on the existence of one or two 0-12 years ( Adapted from South East CASA brochure)

31 Indicators of Child Sexual Abuse Some indicators of child sexual abuse may include: displaying greater sexual knowledge than normally expected for their age or developmental level displaying greater sexual knowledge than normally expected for their age or developmental level inappropriate sexual play and behaviour with themselves, other children or dolls and toys inappropriate sexual play and behaviour with themselves, other children or dolls and toys hints about sexual activity through actions or comments that are inappropriate to the childs age or developmental level hints about sexual activity through actions or comments that are inappropriate to the childs age or developmental level excessive masturbation or masturbation in public after kindergarten age excessive masturbation or masturbation in public after kindergarten age persistent bedwetting, urinating or soiling in clothes persistent bedwetting, urinating or soiling in clothes persistent sexual themes in their drawings or play time persistent sexual themes in their drawings or play time

32 Indicators of Child Sexual Abuse running away running away destroying property destroying property hurting or mutilating animals hurting or mutilating animals creating stories, poems or artwork about abuse creating stories, poems or artwork about abuse difficulty concentrating or being withdrawn or overly obedient difficulty concentrating or being withdrawn or overly obedient having unexpected redness, soreness or injury around the penis, vagina, mouth or anus having unexpected redness, soreness or injury around the penis, vagina, mouth or anus having torn, stained or bloody clothing, especially underwear having torn, stained or bloody clothing, especially underwear recurring themes of power or control in play. recurring themes of power or control in play. Should any of the above be present, a child may need parents or other adults to take action to keep them safe from any further harm.

33 Prevalence of Child Sexual Abuse More than 5,000 substantiated child sexual abuse cases make it into Australian courts each year, but experts believe the real number it into Australian courts each year, but experts believe the real number of incidents is closer to 50,000 (Dr B Klettke; Deakin University Melbourne, reported in the Age, August 26 th 2008) (Dr B Klettke; Deakin University Melbourne, reported in the Age, August 26 th 2008)

34 Speaking Up 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 7 boys are sexually abused in Australia (Australian Institute of Criminology, 2004) 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 7 boys are sexually abused in Australia (Australian Institute of Criminology, 2004) 31% of respondents in an Australian study stated they would not believe children's stories about being abused, meaning most children have to tell 3 different adults before they are believed (Australian Childhood Foundation Report 2006) 31% of respondents in an Australian study stated they would not believe children's stories about being abused, meaning most children have to tell 3 different adults before they are believed (Australian Childhood Foundation Report 2006) Only about 3% of abused children will ever tell of their abuse (Savi Report, 2004) Only about 3% of abused children will ever tell of their abuse (Savi Report, 2004) Only 5% of child sex offenders will have been caught and convicted for their crimes Only 5% of child sex offenders will have been caught and convicted for their crimes (Dr K. Gelb, Victorian Sentencing Commission) (Dr K. Gelb, Victorian Sentencing Commission)

35 Who sexually offends against children? Males 90 to 95% of sex offenders are male. 90 to 95% of sex offenders are male. (Crime statistics / victim reports, British Crime Survey) (Crime statistics / victim reports, British Crime Survey)Females Up to 6% of all reported child sexual abuse in Australia is perpetrated by females. Up to 6% of all reported child sexual abuse in Australia is perpetrated by females. (Child Wise, 2006) Adolescents At least 33% of all offending against children in Australia is committed by another child or young person. At least 33% of all offending against children in Australia is committed by another child or young person. (P.Tidmarsh, MAPPS, 2005)

36 Who sexually offends against children? Sexual offending usually begins in adolescence. (Abel and Osborn 1988) Sexual offending usually begins in adolescence. (Abel and Osborn 1988) More than three quarters of offenders reported an exclusively heterosexual orientation. (Smallbone & Wortley, 2001) More than three quarters of offenders reported an exclusively heterosexual orientation. (Smallbone & Wortley, 2001) Many adult men who sexually offend against children report experiences of childhood physical abuse or neglect. Self reports of child sexual abuse range from 22% to 82% (Salter, A 2003 p73) Many adult men who sexually offend against children report experiences of childhood physical abuse or neglect. Self reports of child sexual abuse range from 22% to 82% (Salter, A 2003 p73) In extra-familial cases 71% of offenders reported that the childs parents usually knew the offender was spending time alone with the child. In extra-familial cases 71% of offenders reported that the childs parents usually knew the offender was spending time alone with the child.

37 Grooming Techniques To get close to children, people who sexually offend use grooming techniques which allow them to form special or power-based relationships with children.special or power-based relationships with children.

38 Grooming Techniques Grooming techniques include: Buying children lollies, sporting equipment, swap cards and other things a child may like or value Buying children lollies, sporting equipment, swap cards and other things a child may like or value Paying special attention to a child and making them feel special Paying special attention to a child and making them feel special Asking children to keep secrets from parents, siblings & friends – may not necessarily be sexual Asking children to keep secrets from parents, siblings & friends – may not necessarily be sexual Using threats, bribes and/or physical violence Using threats, bribes and/or physical violence

39 Visible grooming… Situations where adults are involved with a child more than you would expect in their role/relationship Situations where adults are involved with a child more than you would expect in their role/relationship Where an adult seems to be particularly interested in a child or particular activities that allow for additional intimacy ie, overnights, swimming, time alone. Where an adult seems to be particularly interested in a child or particular activities that allow for additional intimacy ie, overnights, swimming, time alone. Situations where a child is given gifts or taken to outings which are unexpected or unusual in any way Situations where a child is given gifts or taken to outings which are unexpected or unusual in any way A child seems to have a special relationship with aspects to it that are private and do not involve other adults or children. A child seems to have a special relationship with aspects to it that are private and do not involve other adults or children. Where a child may be keeping secrets or have built a relationship with a secret friend Where a child may be keeping secrets or have built a relationship with a secret friend

40 Protecting Children from Child Sexual Abusers be suspicious if an adult wants to spend time alone with your child be suspicious if an adult wants to spend time alone with your child be wary of people who are overly affectionate or generous with gifts to your child be wary of people who are overly affectionate or generous with gifts to your child be careful about the company your children keep. Watch childrens behaviour for signs of stress their reactions to certain individuals may tell you something be careful about the company your children keep. Watch childrens behaviour for signs of stress their reactions to certain individuals may tell you something teach children about being safe in a way that does not frighten them teach children about being safe in a way that does not frighten them teach children that the parts of their bodies covered by underwear are private teach children that the parts of their bodies covered by underwear are private

41 SECTION 4 Disclosure and Response

42 It is important to know that it is rare that a child will disclose physical or sexual abuse experience/s It is important to know that it is rare that a child will disclose physical or sexual abuse experience/s

43 Children dont tell because they: Children dont tell because they: think they are to blame think they are to blame are scared of getting into trouble are scared of getting into trouble are embarrassed / ashamed /confused are embarrassed / ashamed /confused are scared of the perpetrator are scared of the perpetrator worry about getting the perpetrator into trouble worry about getting the perpetrator into trouble dont know that what has happened to them is wrong dont know that what has happened to them is wrong lack adequate communication skills lack adequate communication skills

44 Disclosure of Harm Disclosures of Harm may sound like: I think I saw…..I think I saw….. Somebody told me that….Somebody told me that…. Just think you should know….Just think you should know…. Im not sure what I want you to do, but….Im not sure what I want you to do, but….

45 Responding to Disclosure DO Find a private place to talk Let them tell their experience in their own words and time Listen calmly Validate the disclosure e.g. I am pleased you have told me these things Believe them Contain your own feelings Avoid defending the abuser Support them Reporting and Recording

46 Responding to Disclosure DONT Panic and overreact Ask leading questions e.g. Was it your father who did it to you Ask too many questions Promise confidentiality Make little of it Show your feelings towards the abuser Leave the child alone after a disclosure Forget Confidentiality

47 Emphasise that the student is not to blame. Accept what is said by the student, only minimum information is required for action. Accept what is said by the student, only minimum information is required for action. Focus on childs current emotions about telling you, dont ask questions about the actual abuse. Focus on childs current emotions about telling you, dont ask questions about the actual abuse. Assure the student that they have the right to feel safe. Assure the student that they have the right to feel safe.

48 Try not to express a judgement about the perpetrator. Remember children may still love and will protect abusive parents [and others they feel close to]. Remember children may still love and will protect abusive parents [and others they feel close to]. Dont promise not to tell. Dont promise not to tell. Tell the student you will be reporting this to a person who will be able to help. Tell the student you will be reporting this to a person who will be able to help.

49 Reassure the student that support will continue at school

50 SECTION 5 Reporting and Recording

51 MANDATORY REPORTING SUSPECTED OR LIKELY SEXUAL ABUSE OF A STUDENT FROM ANY SOURCE A staff member (the first person) is required by law to report this in writing (FORM A) to the Principal or the Diocesan Director A staff member (the first person) is required by law to report this in writing (FORM A) to the Principal or the Diocesan Director By Law the person receiving the report is obliged to pass it on to the police By Law the person receiving the report is obliged to pass it on to the police

52 LEGAL PROTECTION The law ensures that staff members reporting a reasonable suspicion of sexual abuse or likely sexual abuse of a student will not be liable under a civil, criminal or administrative process.

53 Compulsory Reporting Compulsory Reporting It could be that: someone else, for example another child, a parent, or a staff member, tells you that harm has occurred or is likely to occur someone else, for example another child, a parent, or a staff member, tells you that harm has occurred or is likely to occur a student tells you they know someone who has been harmed (they may be referring to themselves) a student tells you they know someone who has been harmed (they may be referring to themselves) you are concerned at significant changes in the behaviour of a student, or the presence of new unexplained and suspicious injuries you are concerned at significant changes in the behaviour of a student, or the presence of new unexplained and suspicious injuries you see the harm happening you see the harm happening a student tells you they have been harmed a student tells you they have been harmed

54 The School s Student Protection Contact (who will refer the report to the Principal) or The Principal If the incident involves the Principal, report the incident immediately to the Assistant to the Director or, in the case of mandatory reporting, to the Diocesan Director WHAT DO I DO? If you suspect, have a report or disclosure of harm of any kind (other than sexual abuse or likely sexual abuse): REPORT this (FORM B) to:

55 HOW DO I DO IT? Complete a Student Protection Reporting Form : Complete a Student Protection Reporting Form : Form A – Mandatory reporting of suspected or likely sexual abuse Form B – Compulsory reporting of harm/ likely harm Make an appointment as soon as possible [immediately in the case of the mandatory reporting requirements and/or if you feel the child is in immediate danger] with the Principal (or Student Protection Contact.) Make an appointment as soon as possible [immediately in the case of the mandatory reporting requirements and/or if you feel the child is in immediate danger] with the Principal (or Student Protection Contact.) Remember confidentiality.

56 FORM A(suspected / likely sexual abuse) and FORM B (harm/ likely harm) Section 1: To be completed by First Person Section 1: To be completed by First Person Section 2: To be completed by Principal, Student Protection Contact, Assistant Director: Schools or Diocesan Director Section 2: To be completed by Principal, Student Protection Contact, Assistant Director: Schools or Diocesan Director Section 3: Checklist Section 3: Checklist

57 WHO ARE THE STUDENT PROTECTION CONTACTS AT YOUR SCHOOL??? WHO ARE THE STUDENT PROTECTION CONTACTS AT YOUR SCHOOL???

58 Reporting – what happens then? Your Report is handed to the principal. Your Report is handed to the principal. Action could include: Keeping diary notes to monitor a situation. Keeping diary notes to monitor a situation. Pastoral support for the child and family Pastoral support for the child and family Notifying the Department of Child Safety. Notifying the Department of Child Safety. Notifying the Child Protection Investigation Unit Notifying the Child Protection Investigation Unit Notifying Towards Healing and the Director of Qld Professional Standards Notifying Towards Healing and the Director of Qld Professional Standards A referral to an outside agency. A referral to an outside agency. The Principal will inform the Student Protection Coordinator or AD: Schools at DCEO or (in the case of mandatory reporting) the Diocesan Director

59 When an allegation or concern is registered the principal MUST: Make the student the primary concern; Promptly notify the Student Protection Coordinator, AD: Schools or Diocesan Director; Follow the procedures laid down in the 2013 DCEO Student Protection Processes..

60 Catholic Education, Diocese of Rockhampton Student Protection Processes 2013 Available to all on their Desktop (Mysuite), School Library, School website.

61 Communication School staff can directly contact the Assistant to the Director, Student Protection Coordinator or the Director – the safety of the child is paramount School staff can directly contact the Assistant to the Director, Student Protection Coordinator or the Director – the safety of the child is paramount Principal will inform staff member who raised the concern of action taken Principal will inform staff member who raised the concern of action taken Staff, if not happy with the outcome of their reporting to school authorities, may directly report to statutory authorities Staff, if not happy with the outcome of their reporting to school authorities, may directly report to statutory authorities

62 STAFF RESPONSIBILITY It is the responsibility of all staff to: Be alert to the signs which could indicate that a student is being harmed in some way. Be alert to the signs which could indicate that a student is being harmed in some way. Develop basic skills in knowing how to respond to a disclosure by a student. Develop basic skills in knowing how to respond to a disclosure by a student. Understand their obligations under legislation and policy to report harm Understand their obligations under legislation and policy to report harm

63 OUTSIDE RESPONSIBILITY The Department of Child Safety and Police determine whether abuse has occurred or if a child is at risk of harm and implement the action to be taken The Department of Child Safety and Police determine whether abuse has occurred or if a child is at risk of harm and implement the action to be taken

64 CHILD PROTECTION ACT 1999 Components of the Act that apply to schools The identity of individuals who notify the Department or police service of their concerns about a child is confidential and they are protected from civil liability

65 INFORMING PARENTS / CAREGIVERS Authorised Child Safety and police officers can have contact with children at school or in a child care centre in specific situations when investigating an allegation of harm to a child. It is the responsibility of these officers – NOT THE SCHOOL – to inform the parents/caregivers

66 CONFIDENTIALITY Any case of suspected harm to students must remain confidential, should never become a topic of gossip and should never be spoken about freely with others. If communicated to others with no right to know, the person suspected could take an action for damages for defamation.

67 SECTION 6 Prevention and Protective Behaviours

68 It is important that: Every child knows to whom they can report instances of abuse at your school [Class Teacher, Student Protection Contact, Principal]. Every child knows to whom they can report instances of abuse at your school [Class Teacher, Student Protection Contact, Principal]. Every child has been involved in a lesson based on the Feeling Unsafe Poster. Every child has been involved in a lesson based on the Feeling Unsafe Poster. The Feeling Unsafe Posters are displayed all over the school. The Feeling Unsafe Posters are displayed all over the school. Student Protection Contacts are introduced to the community (eg at assembly) on a regular basis. Student Protection Contacts are introduced to the community (eg at assembly) on a regular basis.

69 DCEO Primary School Poster Secondary College Poster

70 Schools should be proactive. Protective Behaviours should be a key element of all schools curriculums. Protective Behaviours should be a key element of all schools curriculums. Reinforce Protective Behaviours Themes Reinforce Protective Behaviours Themes We all have the right to feel safe all of the We all have the right to feel safe all of the time. time. Nothing is so awful that we cant talk about Nothing is so awful that we cant talk about it with someone. it with someone. Encourage students to develop support Encourage students to develop support networks. networks.

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72 BLUE CARDS (do help) Since 2001 there have been over 5,800 cases where people have been prevented from working with children. Since 2001 there have been over 5,800 cases where people have been prevented from working with children. In alone there were over 868 cases where people were prevented from working with children In alone there were over 868 cases where people were prevented from working with children

73 Risk management strategies All regulated child-related organisations in Queensland are required by law to have a risk management strategy Purpose is to protect children in child-related service environments from harm by developing and implementing practices and procedures.

74 Risk management strategies Include: appropriate standards of behaviour for interacting with children and young people appropriate standards of behaviour for interacting with children and young people maintaining a blue card register maintaining a blue card register suitable recruitment, training and management of staff (in addition to blue card screening) suitable recruitment, training and management of staff (in addition to blue card screening) appropriate handling of disclosures and suspicions of harm appropriate handling of disclosures and suspicions of harm involving children and young people in the development of organisations processes involving children and young people in the development of organisations processes

75 Remember that: Remember that: - The childs safety and well-being is paramount; - Your decision not to report may place a child at serious, possible life-threatening risk; - The main aim of the of the Department of Child Safety is to follow up with the family to make sure the child is safe and try to assist the family to resolve problems and/or refer the family to support agencies.

76 Be aware: Some people feel that making a notification may - place their relationship with the child at risk - place their relationship with the family at risk - make the childs situation worse - mean they have to be involved in an investigation - mean they will have to attend court and be cross examined - mean they are telling on a family without knowing with certainty whether abuse or maltreatment is actually occurring - mean they are making an unfair class, race or gender judgment - make them feel as though they are intruding on another familys business Conclusion BUT – AT THE END OF THE DAY, A CHILDS WELL-BEING COMES FIRST A CHILDS WELL-BEING COMES FIRST

77 On behalf of the students from the Schools of the Rockhampton Diocese… THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION.


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