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2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Please read this before using presentation This presentation is based on content presented at the Mines Safety Roadshow held.

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Presentation on theme: "2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Please read this before using presentation This presentation is based on content presented at the Mines Safety Roadshow held."— Presentation transcript:

1 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Please read this before using presentation This presentation is based on content presented at the Mines Safety Roadshow held in October 2009 It is made available for non-commercial use (e.g. toolbox meetings) subject to the condition that the PowerPoint is not altered without permission from Resources Safety Supporting resources, such as brochures and posters, are available from Resources Safety For resources, information or clarification, please contact: or visit 1

2 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Toolbox presentation Safe access to vehicles and other mobile equipment 2

3 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow The bad old days (we hope!) 3

4 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Injuries related to vehicle access Injury data for 2006 – YearAverage workforce Fall getting offFall getting on LTIsDIsLTIsDIs , , , YearStepping offStepping on LTIsDIsLTIsDIs

5 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Injuries related to vehicle access (continued) Injury data for 2006 – YearOver-exertion getting offOver-exertion getting on LTIsDIsLTIsDIs YearFall fromFall on LTIsDIsLTIsDIs

6 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Why is safe access so important? Initial injury report Minor DI (10 days off) – Surface – Operator was climbing ladder to get to vehicle cabin when he overstretched his left arm to pull his body up the ladder, rather than using his legs as usual. He felt a sharp pain in the shoulder. Ongoing medical assessment indicated that injury was not healing as expected and surgery was later required. Recurrence report Serious DI (26 days lost, 106 days off) - Surgery resulted in a further 26 days lost and 106 days off. 6

7 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Where can we find out more? Resources Safety publications AS/NZS 3868:1991 Earth moving machinery – Design guide for access systems AS 1657:1992 Fixed platforms, walkways, stairways and ladders – Design, construction and installation WorkSafe Code of Practice – Prevention of falls at workplaces HSE information sheets WPT01 and WPT02 7

8 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow What are we dealing with? Due to their size and height of platforms involved, large mining equipment and vehicles can be difficult to: access alight from maintain clean 8

9 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Access to cab 1. Height of first step The more a person has to bend knees, the less force can be produced by leg to support the body The greater the height a person has to step down from, the harder it is to lower the body in a controlled, slow way (important when stepping onto uneven ground) Recommended height from ground: 40 cm 9

10 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Access to cab (continued) 2. Step depth and height User requires good footing Similar step height and depth for consistency 10

11 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Access to cab (continued) 3. Step tread Slip-resistant surface Regular cleaning and maintenance 11

12 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Access to cab (continued) 4. Handholds and handrails Steps and handholds must be located to accommodate all users. Handrails provide stability and support. 12

13 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Access to cab (continued) 5. Other factors to consider Footwear – non-skid Environment – lighting, weather, surface contaminants Human factors – physical and mental state, job design, technique 13

14 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Access to fifth wheel catwalk on articulated vehicles and vehicle load areas If possible, eliminate need to work at height If work at height is unavoidable, provide safe access: Catwalk – When specifying or retrofitting, consider features such as steps, levels, handholds, materials and tread area. Load area – Vehicle-based in preference to site-based 14

15 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Managing the risks Workers have an expert knowledge of the manual tasks they perform and are therefore in the best position to undertake the manual task risk management process. Manual tasks in mining – Fact sheet no. 5 – Participative ergonomics 15

16 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Safe design – get it right from the start Risks can be eliminated or reduced by consulting with workers experienced in the task at the design stage or before purchase. Manual tasks in mining – Fact sheet no. 8 – Machinery and vehicle cab design Manual tasks in mining – Fact sheet no. 9 – Safe design 16

17 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow EMESRT Earth Moving Equipment Safety Round Table Safe design of earth moving and other equipment – EMESRTs role and plans Mining customers and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) 15 design philosophies Expanding focus from earth moving to exploration drilling and other sectors 17

18 2009 Mines Safety Roadshow Incident analysis Handout of incidents selected from Resources Safetys incident database at 1. Categorise into type of incident 2. What could be done to eliminate or mitigate the hazards? Any incidents of your own? 18


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