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SCDN Principal Evaluation Why the Principal is So Important May 30, 2013 Michael Keany Why the Principal is So Important May 30, 2013 Michael Keany.

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Presentation on theme: "SCDN Principal Evaluation Why the Principal is So Important May 30, 2013 Michael Keany Why the Principal is So Important May 30, 2013 Michael Keany."— Presentation transcript:

1 SCDN Principal Evaluation Why the Principal is So Important May 30, 2013 Michael Keany Why the Principal is So Important May 30, 2013 Michael Keany

2 Which Job Did I Not Have? HS Principal Girl Scout Leader Dance escort for single women on a cruise ship MS Principal School Board Member Clown magician at childrens parties Department Chair Assistant Principal Butcher Movie theater usher HS Principal Girl Scout Leader Dance escort for single women on a cruise ship MS Principal School Board Member Clown magician at childrens parties Department Chair Assistant Principal Butcher Movie theater usher

3 Which Job Did I Not Have? HS Principal Girl Scout Leader Dance escort for single women on a cruise ship MS Principal School Board Member Clown magician at childrens parties Department Chair Assistant Principal Butcher Movie theater usher HS Principal Girl Scout Leader Dance escort for single women on a cruise ship MS Principal School Board Member Clown magician at childrens parties Department Chair Assistant Principal Butcher Movie theater usher

4 Conscious Subconscious Creative Subconscious Self Talk truth --adapted from Ray Jorgensen Data Real Learning

5 Draw a School First, a test!

6 Scoring Roof = 1 point Flag = 1 point Door = 1 point each Windows = 1 point each Shrubs = 1 point each Walkway = 1 point Playground = 15 points Mailbox = 15 points Principals Parking Spot = 30 points Passing grade is 60 points!

7 What we know prevents us from seeing.

8 Scho ol 7 Buses The Changing Role of the Principal My Mentor Boilers Books February 8, 2012 Session 1: Highly Effective Leaders

9 Scho ol 8 Regents Exams AP Exams 3-8 ELA Assessments 3-8 Math Assessments Budgets Spec Ed Discipline Attendance Lunch Forms Registers Graduation Rates Buses Audits ELL NYSESLAT Teacher observations Inventory Spec Ed Grad. Requirements PA/PTA SURR SINI C. A. Restructuring LAB-R NYSAA AYP Sub-groups IDEA NCLB The Changing Role of the Principal Me Boilers Books February 8, 2012 Session 1: Highly Effective Leaders

10 Scho ol 9 Regents Exams AP Exams 3-8 ELA Assessments 3-8 Math Assessments Budgets Spec Ed Discipline Attendance Lunch Forms Registers Graduation Rates Buses Audits ELL NYSESLAT Teacher observations Inventory Spec Ed Grad. Requirements PA/PTA SURR SINI C. A. Restructuring LAB-R NYSAA Common Core Standards Benchmarks Scantron AYP Sub-groups Data Teams nySTART JITs PLA NYS Report Cards SEDCAR Data Submission for Fed Indicators Data Verification IDEA UISA IRS NCLB NYC QR NYC Progress Reports ARIS- NYC ELA Shifts Math Shifts The Changing Role of the Principal (My Successor) Boilers Books February 8, 2012 Session 1: Highly Effective Leaders

11 Now, an awareness test!

12

13 What we see prevents us from learning.

14 What Did You Hear? What Does It Mean to You?

15 Evaluating Educator Effectiveness

16 16 Evaluation System Design Principles –NYs Evaluation System follows these design principles: 1. Annual evaluations for all 2. Clear, rigorous expectations for instructional excellence, prioritizing student learning 3. Multiple measures of performance 4. Multiple ratings: 4 performance levels to describe differences in principal effectiveness 5. System should encourage regular constructive feedback and ongoing development 6. Significance: results are a major factor in employment decisions Source: The New Teacher Project (2010). Teacher Evaluation 2.0. Available:

17 17 The ISLLC Standards: Improving Leadership Standards These six standards call for: 1. Setting a widely shared vision for learning; 2. Developing a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth; 3. Ensuring effective management of the organization, operation, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment; 4. Collaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources; 5. Acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner; and 6. Understanding, responding to, and influencing the political, social, legal, and cultural contexts. 17

18 18 Summary of District Implementation Decisions (20% 25%) (20% 15%) (60%) State Growth Assessments and Measures Rubrics Other Measures Subcomponents, Composite Scores, Ratings Improvement Plans, Appeals, Training Growth Locally Selected Measures Other Measures Scoring Imple- mentation Growth Goal Setting

19 19 Six state approved rubrics for Principal Evaluation Principal Evaluation Rubrics by Kim Marshall, Revised August 2011 The Reeves Leadership Performance Matrix, The Leadership and learning Center, 2011 The Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education, VAL-Ed Framework, Discovery Education Multidimensional Principal Performance Rubric, Learning Center Initiatives, 2011 Marzanos School Administrator Rubric, Marzano Research Laboratory, 2011 McRel Principal Evaluation System, Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning, 2011

20 What does the Statute Endorse? Multiple visits- one unannounced- by various observers Ambitious and measurable goals which drive student growth Quantifiable and verifiable goals which measure academic achievement and or school climate

21 Where is it in the Statute? Page 21, lines 4-13 (4) A majority of the sixty points for building principals shall be based on a broad assessment of the principals leadership and management actions based on a principal practice rubric by the building principals supervisor….such assessment must incorporate multiple school visits….with at least one visit conducted by the supervisor and at least one unannounced visit.

22 Where is it in the Statute? Page 21, lines …at least two other sources of evidence from the following options: feedback from teachers, students and/or families using state-approved instruments; school visits by other trained evaluators; and/or review of school documents, records, and/or state accountability processes.

23 Where is it in the Statute? Page 21, lines Any such remaining points shall be assigned based on the results of one or more ambitious and measurable goals set collaboratively with the principals and their superintendents or district superintendents…

24 Where is it in the Statute? Page 22, lines 1-10 (i) at least one goal must address the principals contribution to improving teacher effectiveness… (ii) any other goals shall address quantifiable and verifiable improvements in academic results or the schools learning environmental such as student or teacher attendance.

25 SMART Goals Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic Timely 7

26 26 Elements in the Principals Evaluation How well does the Principal lead learning? How well does the Principal improve student performance? How well does the Principal create a safe, supportive environment? How well does the Principal build the capacity of her/his staff? How well does the Principal create self-sustaining systems? –The difference between transactional change and transformational change –The difference between effective and highly effective 26

27 27 Elements in the Principals Evaluation How well does the Principal lead learning? How well does the Principal improve student performance? How well does the Principal create a safe, supportive environment? How well does the Principal build the capacity of her/his staff? How well does the Principal create self-sustaining systems? –The difference between transactional change and transformational change –The difference between effective and highly effective 27

28 Leader of Learning Wallaces work since 2000 suggests this entails five key responsibilities: 1. Shaping a vision of academic success for all students, based on high standards 2. Creating a climate hospitable to education in order that safety, a cooperative spirit and other foundations of fruitful interaction prevail 3. Cultivating leadership in others, so that teachers and other adults assume their part in realizing the school vision 4. Improving instruction to enable teachers to teach at their best and students to learn at their utmost 5. Managing people, data and processes to foster school improvement Wallaces work since 2000 suggests this entails five key responsibilities: 1. Shaping a vision of academic success for all students, based on high standards 2. Creating a climate hospitable to education in order that safety, a cooperative spirit and other foundations of fruitful interaction prevail 3. Cultivating leadership in others, so that teachers and other adults assume their part in realizing the school vision 4. Improving instruction to enable teachers to teach at their best and students to learn at their utmost 5. Managing people, data and processes to foster school improvement THE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AS LEADER: GUIDING SCHOOLS TO BETTER TEACHING AND LEARNING - The Wallace Foundation, January

29 Levels of Evidence 10 BAD After lunch, I noticed that none of the teachers were teaching. BETTER After lunch, I noticed that many of the teachers were sitting at their desks while students got settled. BETTER YET Fifteen minutes after students returned from lunch recess, I was walking down the 3 rd grade corridor and noted that 6 of the 8 teachers were sitting at their desks looking at their computers while students were getting settled. BEST The required math block falls right after lunch. 15 minutes into that block I noted that 6 of the 8 3 rd -grade teachers were sitting at their desks looking at their computers. I went into two of those six classrooms to see what students were doing. In both rooms, they were reading or working on non-math worksheets.

30 Welcome to Happy Valley MS _________________ A Faculty Meeting An Evidence Collecting Activity Record Evidence on the Principals Ability to Lead Learning

31 Rank These in Terms of Influence on Achievement John Hatties Meta-Analysis - Visual Learning Cooperative Learning Ability Grouping Teaching Study Skills Retention in grade Student-Teacher Relationships Feedback Problem Based Learning Drama/Art Programs Illness (lack of) Homework

32 Rank These in Terms of Influence on Achievement John Hatties Meta-Analysis - Visual Learning Feedback0.73 Student-Teacher Relationships0.72 Teaching Study Skills0.59 Coorperative Learning0.41 Drama/Arts Programs0.35 Homework0.29 Illness (lack of)0.23 Problem Based Learning0.15 Ability Grouping0.12 Retention in grade-0.16

33 Mastery Learning: All children can learn when they focus on mastering tasks in a collaborative environment. Appropriate learning conditions in the classroom include: High levels of cooperation between classmates; Focused teacher feedback that is both frequent and diagnostic; Variable time allowed to reach levels of attainment

34 Mastery Learning: All children can learn when they focus on mastering tasks in a collaborative environment. Appropriate learning conditions in the classroom include: High levels of cooperation between classmates; Focused teacher feedback that is both frequent and diagnostic; Variable time allowed to reach levels of attainment

35 If feedback is so important, what kind of feedback should be taking place in our classrooms? Discuss in pairs for 2 minutes

36 The most powerful single influence enhancing achievement is feedback Quality feedback is needed, not more feedback Much of the feedback provided by the teacher to the student is not valued and not acted on Students with a Growth Mindset welcome feedback and are more likely to use it to improve their performance Oral feedback is much more effective than written The most powerful feedback is provided from the student to the teacher

37 How could we obtain more feedback from students? How can we ensure we act on this feedback to raise achievement? Discuss in pairs

38 Welcome to Happy Valley MS _________________ A Faculty Meeting What Evidence Did You Collect on the Principals Ability to Lead Learning How Would You Rate This Principal?

39 39 The ISLLC Standards: Improving Leadership Standards These six standards call for: 1. Setting a widely shared vision for learning; 2. Developing a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth; 3. Ensuring effective management of the organization, operation, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment; 4. Collaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources; 5. Acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner; and 6. Understanding, responding to, and influencing the political, social, legal, and cultural contexts. 39

40 By the way, an effective principal has a rating of 0.36!

41 What Did You Hear? What Does It Mean to You?

42 3 Instructional Shifts Demanded by the Core 6 Shifts in ELA/Literacy Balancing Informational and Literary Text Building Knowledge in the Disciplines Staircase of Complexity Text-based Answers Writing from Sources Academic Vocabulary 3 What is the Work? Implementing the Common Core

43 Shifts in ELA/Literacy Read as much non fiction as fiction Learn about the world by reading Read more challenging material closely Discuss reading using evidence Write non-fiction using evidence Increase academic vocabulary 17 Shifts for Students Demanded by the Core Presentation to use with students AND parents

44 10 What is the Work? Implementing Data Driven Instruction Tito ate one fourth of a cheese pizza. Tito ate three eighths of a pepperoni pizza… All pizzas were the same size. Luis thinks he ate more than Tito because h didnt eat any pepperoni pizza…Luis thinks he ate more. Who is correct? Show your mathematical thinking… 10

45 45 Elements in the Principals Evaluation How well does the Principal lead learning? How well does the Principal improve student performance? How well does the Principal create a safe, supportive environment? How well does the Principal build the capacity of her/his staff? How well does the Principal create self-sustaining systems? –The difference between transactional change and transformational change –The difference between effective and highly effective 45

46 The Key Shift 8 The new principal evaluation system will drive a key shift:

47 Practice Leads to Results 60 points 40 points

48 48 Elements in the Principals Evaluation How well does the Principal lead learning? How well does the Principal improve student performance? How well does the Principal create a safe, supportive environment? How well does the Principal build the capacity of her/his staff? How well does the Principal create self-sustaining systems? –The difference between transactional change and transformational change –The difference between effective and highly effective 48

49 1. 1.Caring about students (Encouragement and Support) 2. 2.Controlling behavior (Press for Cooperation and Peer Support) 3. 3.Clarifying lessons (Success Seems Feasible) 4. 4.Challenging students (Press for Effort, Perseverance and Rigor) 5. 5.Captivating students (Learning seems Interesting and Relevant) 6. 6.Conferring with students (Students Sense their Ideas are Respected) 7. 7.Consolidating knowledge (Ideas get Connected and Integrated) Tripod Student Survey- The 7 Cs 30

50 50 Elements in the Principals Evaluation How well does the Principal lead learning? How well does the Principal improve student performance? How well does the Principal create a safe, supportive environment? How well does the Principal build the capacity of her/his staff? How well does the Principal create self-sustaining systems? –The difference between transactional change and transformational change –The difference between effective and highly effective 50

51

52

53 10 TLS Observer Evidence Rubric

54 © 2012, Community Training and Assistance Center *Please see caveat A Sample SLO Process Flow 10

55 © 2012, Community Training and Assistance Center *Please see caveat Introduction to the Rubric 22

56 56 © 2012, Community Training and Assistance Center *Please see caveat To Think About Why not insist that all SLOs meet the highest quality? 2. Who will present the analytic rubric to the faculty? 3. How will it be presented? 4. What will be the process for quality control? 5. Who will assist with revisions and resubmissions? 5

57 57 © 2012, Community Training and Assistance Center *Please see caveat Quality of SLOs There is a high correlation between the quality of the SLOs written and student achievement. 6

58 Distribution of Teacher MGPs MGP NOTE: Beta results using available data. For illustrative purposes only

59 59 © 2012, Community Training and Assistance Center *Please see caveat Key Take-aways for Principal Success Lead Up Collect Your Own Evidence Work Symbiotically Plan Your Year Prepare to Avoid Problems - Produce Better Results The Devil is in the Details - Know Them Know What You Dont Know Lead Up Collect Your Own Evidence Work Symbiotically Plan Your Year Prepare to Avoid Problems - Produce Better Results The Devil is in the Details - Know Them Know What You Dont Know 113

60 This keynote presentation and this afternoons workshop will be available on School Leadership This keynote presentation and this afternoons workshop will be available on School Leadership A special group has been created to allow access to these materials and to continue learning after the conference and throughout the year. evaluation evaluation


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