Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Putting All Markets Together: The AS-AD Model. Aggregate Supply The aggregate supply relation captures the effects of output on the price level. It is.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Putting All Markets Together: The AS-AD Model. Aggregate Supply The aggregate supply relation captures the effects of output on the price level. It is."— Presentation transcript:

1 Putting All Markets Together: The AS-AD Model

2 Aggregate Supply The aggregate supply relation captures the effects of output on the price level. It is derived from the behavior of wages and prices (chapter 6 model). Recall the equations for wage and price determination:

3 Deriving the Aggregate Supply Relation Step 1: By combining those 2 equations and eliminating W (nominal wage) we get: The price level depends on the expected price level and the unemployment rate. We assume that the mark-up ( ) and labor market conditions (z) are constant.

4 Deriving the Aggregate Supply Relation Step 2: Express the unemployment rate in terms of output: Therefore, for a given labor force, the higher is output, the lower is the unemployment rate.

5 Deriving the Aggregate Supply Relation Step 3: Replace the unemployment rate in the equation obtained in step one: The price level depends on the expected price level, P e, and the level of output, Y (and also, z, and L, which we assume are constant here).

6 Properties of the AS Relation The AS relation has two important properties: 1. An increase in output leads to an increase in the price level. This is the result of four steps:

7 Properties of the AS Relation 2. An increase in the expected price level leads, one for one, to an increase in the actual price level. This effect works through wages:

8 Aggregate Supply Given the expected price level, an increase in output leads to an increase in the price level. If output is equal to the natural level of output, the price level is equal to the expected price level. The Aggregate Supply Curve

9 Properties of the AS curve 1. The AS curve is upward sloping. An increase in output leads to an increase in the price level. 2. The AS curve goes through point A, where Y = Y n and P = P e. This property has two implications: 1. When Y > Y n, P > P e. 2. When Y < Y n, P < P e. 3. An increase in P e shifts the AS curve up, and a decrease in P e shifts the AS curve down.

10 Aggregate Supply The Effect of an Increase in the Expected Price Level on the Aggregate Supply Curve

11 Aggregate Demand The aggregate demand relation captures the effect of the price level on output. It is derived from the equilibrium conditions in the goods and financial markets. Recall the equilibrium conditions for the IS- LM described in chapter 5:

12 Aggregate Demand An increase in the price level leads to a decrease in output.

13 Aggregate Demand Changes in monetary or fiscal policy, other than the price level, that shift the IS or the LM curvesalso shift the aggregate demand curve.

14 Aggregate Demand An increase in government spending increases output at a given price level, shifting the aggregate demand curve to the right. A decrease in nominal money decreases output at a given price level, shifting the aggregate demand curve to the left.

15 Equilibrium in the Short Run and in the Medium Run Equilibrium depends on the value of P e. The value of P e determines the position of the aggregate supply curve, and the position of the AS curve affects the equilibrium.

16 Equilibrium in the Short Run The equilibrium is given by the intersection of the aggregate supply curve and the aggregate demand curve. At point A, the labor market, the goods market, and financial markets are all in equilibrium.

17 From the Short Run to the Medium Run Wage setters will revise upward their expectations of the future price level. This will cause the AS curve to shift upward. Wage setters will revise upward their expectations of the future price level. This will cause the AS curve to shift upward. Expectation of a higher price level also leads to a higher nominal wage, which in turn leads to a higher price level. Expectation of a higher price level also leads to a higher nominal wage, which in turn leads to a higher price level.

18 From the Short Run to the Medium Run The adjustment ends once wage setters no longer have a reason to change their expectations. In the medium run, output returns to the natural level of output.

19 From the Short Run to the Medium Run If output is above the natural level of output, the AS curve shifts up over time, until output has decreased back to the natural level of output. And vice versa if output was below the natural level.

20 The Effects of a Monetary Expansion In the aggregate demand equation, we can see that an increase in nominal money, M, leads to an increase in the real money stock, M/P, leading to an increase in output. The aggregate demand curve shifts to the right.

21 The Dynamics of Adjustment The increase in the nominal money stock causes the aggregate demand curve to shift to the right. In the short run, output and the price level increase. The difference between Y and Y n sets in motion the adjustment of price expectations.

22 The Dynamic Effects of a Monetary Expansion In the medium run, the AS curve shifts to AS and the economy returns to equilibrium at Y n. The increase in prices is proportional to the increase in the nominal money stock.

23 The Dynamics of Adjustment Conclusion: A monetary expansion leads to an increase in output in the short run, but has no effect on output in the medium run.

24 Monetary Expansion The impact of a monetary expansion on the interest rate can be illustrated by the IS-LM model. The short-run effect of the monetary expansion is to shift the LM curve down. The interest rate is lower, output is higher.

25 Over time, the price level increases, the real money stock decreases and the LM curve returns to where it was before the increase in nominal money. In the medium run, the real money stock and the interest rate remain unchanged. Monetary Expansion

26 The Neutrality of Money Over time, the price level increases, and the effects of a monetary expansion on output and on the interest rate disappear. The neutrality of money refers to the fact that an increase in the nominal money stock has no effect on output or the interest rate in the medium run. The increase in the nominal money stock is completely absorbed by an increase in the price level.

27 A Decrease in the Budget Deficit A decrease in the budget deficit leads initially to a decrease in output. Over time, output returns to the natural level of output.

28 Deficit Reduction Since the price level declines in response to the decrease in output, the real money stock increases. This causes a shift of the LM curve to LM. Both output and the interest rate are lower than before the fiscal contraction.

29 Deficit Reduction Deficit reduction leads in the short run to a decrease in output and to a decrease in the interest rate. In the medium run, output returns to its natural level, while the interest rate declines further.

30 Deficit Reduction, Output, and the Interest Rate in the Medium Run The composition of output is different than it was before deficit reduction. Income and taxes remain unchanged, thus, consumption is the same as before. Income and taxes remain unchanged, thus, consumption is the same as before. Government spending is lower than before; therefore, investment must be higher than before deficit reduction higher by an amount exactly equal to the decrease in G. Government spending is lower than before; therefore, investment must be higher than before deficit reduction higher by an amount exactly equal to the decrease in G.

31 The Price of Oil

32 Changes in the Price of Oil The Price of Crude Petroleum since 1998

33 Effects on the Natural Rate of Unemployment The higher price of oil causes an increase in the markup and a downward shift of the price-setting line.

34 The Dynamics of Adjustment After the increase in the price of oil, the new AS curve goes through point B, where output equals the new lower natural level of output, Y n, and the price level equals P e. The economy moves along the AD curve, from A to A. Output decreases from Y n to Y.

35 The Dynamics of Adjustment Over time, the economy moves along the AD curve, from A to A. At point A, the economy has reached the new lower natural level of output, Y n, and the price level is higher than before the oil shock.

36 The Dynamics of Adjustment The Stagflation After the Increase in the Price of Oil ( ) Rate of change of petroleum price (%) Rate of change of Inflation (%) Rate of GDP growth (%) Unemployment rate (%)

37 Conclusion: The Short Run Versus the Medium Run Short RunMedium Run Output Level Interest Rate Price Level Output Level Interest Rate Price Level Monetary expansion increasedecrease increase (small)no change increase Fiscal contraction decrease decrease (small)no changedecrease Increase in oil price decreaseincrease decreaseincrease


Download ppt "Putting All Markets Together: The AS-AD Model. Aggregate Supply The aggregate supply relation captures the effects of output on the price level. It is."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google