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Lesson 1: Ohms Law Equation The relationship between voltage, amperage, and resistance can be expressed in a simple equation. This equation is known as.

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson 1: Ohms Law Equation The relationship between voltage, amperage, and resistance can be expressed in a simple equation. This equation is known as."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lesson 1: Ohms Law Equation The relationship between voltage, amperage, and resistance can be expressed in a simple equation. This equation is known as Ohms law. Ohms law is represented by the equation where volts = current × resistance. This equation often simplified into the expression V = I × R where V = Volts, I = Current, and R = Resistance. Each quantity is expressed in units. V is expressed in volts. I is expressed in amps, and R is expressed in ohms. Next Help Information

2 Lesson 2: Solving for I In many situations the voltage is nearly constant. Taking voltage (V) readings is easy because these readings can be taken with the circuit energized and ready to use. Using simple algebraic concepts Ohms law can be rearranged so we can solve for resistance (R) or current (I). I can be calculated using the formula I = V ÷ R. Next

3 Lesson 3: Calculating I It is often practical to calculate I using Ohms law. In order to calculate I, V and R must be known. V is determined to be 12 volts using a voltmeter. R is determined to be 3 ohms using an Ohm meter. I can be calculated using the formula I = V ÷ R. Rewritten for this case the formula is I = 12 ÷ 3. I is 4 amps. Next

4 Lesson 4: Solving for R Using simple algebraic concepts Ohms law can be rearranged so we can solve for resistance (R). This is another case of rearranging the formula for Ohms law using simple algebraic principals. To solve for resistance use the formula: R = V ÷ I Next

5 Lesson 5: Calculating R It is often practical to calculate R using Ohms law. In order to calculate R, V and I must be known. V is determined to be 12 volts using a voltmeter. I is determined to be 2 amps using an Ohm meter. I can be calculated using the formula R = V ÷ I. Rewritten for this case the formula is R = 12 ÷ 6. R is 2 ohms. Next

6 Lesson 6: Calculating V It is possible to calculate V using Ohms law. In order to calculate V, R and I must be known. R is determined to be 4 ohms using a voltmeter. I is determined to be 3 amps using an Ohm meter. V can be calculated using the formula V = I × R. Rewritten for this case the formula is V = 3 ÷ 4. V is 12 volts. Next

7 Help Learn Each Lesson Answer Each Question Read each lesson. When you are done click the next arrow to move on. Press the help button if you need help. Each question must be answered correctly to continue to the next lesson. You will be given more information if you fail to answer each question correctly. Back

8 Question 1: Ohms Law Equation Question: Answer: Select the correct representations of volts, current, and resistance. V = Volts, I = Resistance, R = Current V = Volts, I = Current, R = Resistance V = Resistance, I = Volts, R = Current V = Current, I = Resistance, R = Volts

9 Question 2: Solving for I Question: Answer: Select the correct formula for to solve for I. I = V ÷ R I = R ÷ V I = V × R I = V × V

10 Question 3: Calculating I Question: Answer: If V = 12 and R = 1, select the correct value for I. 12 volts 12 amps 1 amp 6 ohms

11 Question 4: Solving for R Question: Answer: Select the correct formula for to solve for R. V = V ÷ R R = I ÷ V R = V ÷ I R = V ÷ I R = V × I

12 Question 5: Calculating R Question: Answer: If V = 12 and I = 4, select the correct value for R. 12 volts 4 ohms 4 ohms 3 ohms 1 ohm

13 Question 6: Calculating V Question: Answer: If I = 6 and R = 1, select the correct value for V. 2 amps 3 ohms 4 volts 6 volts

14 Question 1: Correct ! Please press the next arrow to continue Next

15 Question 2: Correct ! Please press the next arrow to continue Next

16 Question 3: Correct ! Please press the next arrow to continue Next

17 Question 4: Correct ! Please press the next arrow to continue Next

18 Question 5: Correct ! Please press the next arrow to continue Next

19 Question 6: Correct ! You have completed the Ohms law lesson. Restart

20 Question 1: Incorrect ! This equation often simplified into the expression V = I × R where V = Volts, I = Current, and R = Resistance. Remember, V = Volts. R = Resistance I = Current which does not start with I, but is the only one that does not match. Retry

21 Question 2: Incorrect ! Using simple algebraic concepts Ohms law can be rearranged so we can solve for resistance (R) or current (I). I can be calculated using the formula I = V ÷ R. Retry

22 Question 3: Incorrect ! I can be calculated using the formula I = V ÷ R. Retry

23 Question 4: Incorrect ! To solve for resistance use the formula: R = V ÷ I Retry

24 Question 5: Incorrect ! I can be calculated using the formula R = V ÷ I. Retry

25 Question 6: Incorrect ! V can be calculated using the formula V = I × R. Retry

26 More Information: Ohms Law Ohms law is named after Georg Ohm. Georg Ohm was a scientist that performed electrical experiments in the 1820s. Through hands-on tests and mathematical calculations Georg discovered that power, voltage, resistance, and current are all related and dependant on each other. For our purposes, Georg Ohms equation is simplified into the expression V = I × R where V = Volts, I = Current, and R = Resistance. Back


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