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© Workforce Planning Australia - www.workforceplanning.com.au The Hume Workforce Development Committee Hume Regional Development Australia Accommodation.

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Presentation on theme: "© Workforce Planning Australia - www.workforceplanning.com.au The Hume Workforce Development Committee Hume Regional Development Australia Accommodation."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Workforce Planning Australia - The Hume Workforce Development Committee Hume Regional Development Australia Accommodation and Food Labour Market Snapshot v.2 Workforce Planning Australia | December 2012

2 Tourism, Hospitality and Events 2 | Service Skills Australia includes the following sectors in the Tourism, Hospitality and Events industry. Tourism, Hospitality and Events Cultural services Travel Agencies Accommodation Tour operator services Restaurants Take away food services Pubs, clubs bars and tavern Source: Service Skills Australia, Tourism, Hospitality and Events Skills Council: Environmental Scan 2011 Sport & Recreation Cafes

3 Industry Snapshot Tourism, Hospitality and Events employment data overlap with each other and with other industries, such as Retail, Cultural & Recreation, Sport and Transport. ABS Tourism employment information is categorised under Accommodation and Food 3 | Accommodation and Food Events Tourism Source: Service Skills Australia, Tourism, Hospitality and Events: Environmental Scan

4 Industry Snapshot Australia-wide 4 | More than 500,000 people in Australia were employed in Tourism-Related industries (1) Approximately 788,800 people work in the Accommodation & Food Services Industry (2) Tourism, Hospitality and Events is dominated by small or micro businesses (1) Between 2003 and 2010 national spending on meals in restaurants, hotels and clubs increased by 68% (1) Accommodation and Food Services has the highest proportion of part time workers (56.4%) and casual workers (64.2%) of all industries. (1) Accommodation and Food Services employs the largest share of young workers (15- 24) of all industries.(2) Between 2003 and 2010 the proportion of workers aged 45 and over grew markedly, reaching 21.8% (1) Source: Service Skills Australia, Tourism, Hospitality and Events Environmental Scan (1) DEEWR, Skills Info, Employment Outlook for Accommodation and Food Services (based on the ABS Labour Force Survey (2)

5 Tourism, Hospitality and Events Industries : Industry Snapshot 5 | Approximately 2% of workers are skilled migrants and 7% of workers are on tourism visas (3) Of all tourism and Hospitality industries, cafe, takeaway food services and travel agencies have experienced the strongest growth in employment in 2010 – Other sectors within tourism have declined or remained stable (1) Employment of licensed travel agents experienced strong growth between , but has now levelled out. Business events marketing is experiencing strong growth In international visitors increased by 12 per cent and domestic visitors by 2.6 per cent. Tourism-dependent areas of Australia are suffering due to the increased overseas travel by Australians, particularly to Asia-Pacific region. Source: (1) Service Skills Australia, Tourism, Hospitality and Events, (2) DEEWR, Skills Info, Employment Outlook for Accommodation and Food Services (based on the ABS Labour Force Survey) (3) Department of Arts and the Environment (DAE) Australian Tourism Labour Force Survey, cited in (1)

6 National Industry Overview

7 Industry Employment Accommodation and Food Services employs approximately 773,000 persons, full time and part time, which is around 6.8 per cent of the total workforce. 7 | Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, February 2012 data. Industry Employment Level February 2012

8 Employment Growth Over the past five years, employment in the industry has increased at an average rate of 2.4 per cent per annum. 8 | Source: ABS Labour Force Survey cat. no (DEEWR trend data)

9 Employment by Region Sydney and Melbourne are the largest regions for employment in the industry. 9 |

10 Employment by Industry Sector 10 | Source: Employment Level by Industry Sector (DEEWR Trend Data based on ABS Labour Force, Australia, Cat no: – February 2011) Cafes, Restaurants and Takeaway Food is the largest contributing sector to industry employment.

11 Recent Growth by Sector There has been significant growth in the Cafes, Restaurants and Takeaway Food sector. Accommodation and Pubs, Taverns and Bars has declined. 11 |

12 Projected Employment Growth by Sector Projected employment growth for the industry is 1.2% (below the all industries average). Cafes. Restaurants and Takeaway Food is the fastest growing sector. 12 | Source: ABS Labour Force Survey cat. no (DEEWR trend data)

13 Main employing occupations The table below provides an overview of the main employing occupations in the Accommodation and Food industry: 13 | Source: DEEWR Special Order based on ABS Labour Force, Australia, Cat no: – Calendar Year Average OccupationEmployment ( ) Waiters106.5 Kitchenhands88.2 Bar Attendants and Baristas81.1 Sales Assistants (General)79.6 Chefs62.5 Cafe and Restaurant Managers57.9 Retail Managers34.6 Fast Food Cooks32.0 Cooks24.0 Hotel and Motel Managers21.3

14 National skills in demand 14 | OccupationSkills Status Bar AttendantRegional shortage WaiterRecruitment difficulty (experienced workers, particularly in high end establishments). Source: DEEWR Special Order based on ABS Labour Force, Australia, Cat no: – Calendar Year Average The table below provides an overview of the occupations with skills in demand at the National level:

15 Drivers of Workforce Change and Opportunities 15 | Tourism, Hospitality and Events 1. Fierce competition between destinations and record outbound travel 2.Strong jump in visitors from China, India 3. Growing demand for Asian language tour guide 4.Demand for new and exciting travel experiences 5. A lack of quality training, though commitment to staff training is high 6. A State Govt focus on attracting business events to regional Victoria 7. Industry highly vulnerable to economic forces Source: Accommodation and Food Industry Skills Council, Environmental Scan 2011 There are several workforce development challenges facing the Accommodation and Food Industry

16 Hume region

17 Hume Tourism, Hospitality and Events - Priorities 17 | Tourism Victorias Regional Marketing and Development Plan reports the following investment infrastructure priorities in Hume: Re-development of the Mount Buffalo Chalet Nature-based infrastructure including consideration of an alpine Trial e.g. Mount Hotham and Falls Creek Wild Walk High quality accommodation in Ski villages High Altitude Training Centre at Falls Creek Alpine Resort Boutique accommodation associated with food and wine Ned Kelly Interpretation Centre – Stage Two Glenrowan Precinct Completion of key rail trails, including Murray and Mountain Rail Trail Promotion of Beechworth, Bright, Rutherglen and Yackandandah and Alpine Villages under Villages of Victoria program. Completion of Bonegilla Migrant Centre Source: Tourism Victoria, Regional Marketing and Development Plan,

18 Hume - Events 18 | Events in Hume include: Wangaratta Jazz Festival Kangaroo Hoppet (international Cross country Ski Event) Beechworth Harvest Celebration Opera in the Alps Big Fella Festival (Music) Audux Alpine Classic (cycling) Bike Buller Mountain Bike Festival Terra Australis – Great Southern Land Mountain Bike Epic Source: Tourism Victoria, Regional Marketing and Development Plan,

19 Hume Tourism, Hospitality and Events – Key Locations 19 | The Hume Regional Plan identifies tourism as an economic and employment growth sector in the region. Tourism in the region focuses on the Murray river, snowfields, natural attractions, historic townships, food and wine and cycling. Key areas for tourism are in small towns and national parks including: River towns: Echuca, Cobram and Yarrawonga Historic Townships in Upper and central Hume: Beechworth, Glenrowan Water sports: Nagambie and Yarrawonga High quality food and wine: Milawa Nature-based: Snowfields (summer), National Parks (Bogong, Mt Hotham, Mt Buffalo and Falls Creek, Bright, Mt Beauty and Mt Buller and Barmah Forest Cycling Network: Bright, Myrtleford, Beechworth Source: DPCD, Hume Regional Plan: The Hume Strategy for Sustainable Communities, , Tourism Victoria, Regional Marketing and Development Plan,

20 Hume Tourism, Hospitality and Events - Challenges 20 | Two particular challenges or needs identified in 2011 Hume Regional Growth Plan are: The shortage of facilities for specific markets, such as high quality accommodation in Strathbogie for people involved in the equine industry. The predicted impact of climate change on snow-related tourism in the Alpine areas Other challenges could include: The increasing expectations of consumers for quality food, coffee and accommodation Managing increasing number in nature-based tourism, particularly national parks The quality of training. This could become increasingly important if the region hopes to attract people in the business markets. Source: DPCD, Hume Regional Plan: The Hume Strategy for Sustainable Communities, , Tourism Victoria, Regional Marketing and Development Plan,

21 Employment in Accommodation and Food by LGA 21 | Towong 146 (2006) Wodonga 961 (2006) Alpine 771 (2006) Mansfield 418(2006) Hume Region Boundary Sub-region Boundary Local Government Area (LGA) Boundary Indigo 466 (2006) Murrindindi 548 (2006) Mitchell 629 (2006) Strathbogie 210 (2006) G Shepparton Moira 812 (2006) Wangaratta 801 (2006) Benalla 335 (2006) 1,263 (2006) 387 (2011) 866 (2011) 469 (2011) 1,062 (2011) 147 (2011) 916 (2011) 484 (2011) 727 (2011) 1,392 (2011) 854 (2011) 249 (2011) 450 (2011) 2006 Census vs Census data Total Industry 7,360 (2006) 8,003 (2012) Source: ABS Census Data 2006 and ABS Census Data This table has been prepared using data generated by the ABS TableBuilder. 9%

22 Employment growth projections in Hume According to Monash projections employment is expected to gradually grow and decline over the period to | Usage is restricted to the Department of Education & Early Childhood Development and third parties undertaking work on behalf of Skills Victoria. Source: Monash Centre of Policy Studies, 2011

23 Occupations The top employing occupations in the region are as follows: 23 | OccupationEmployment (000s) Waiters Bar Attendants & Baristas Sales Assistants (General) Kitchenhands Chefs Cafe & Restaurant Managers Fast Food Cooks Hotel & Motel Managers Retail Managers Commercial Cleaners Cooks Cafe Workers Usage is restricted to the Department of Education & Early Childhood Development and third parties undertaking work on behalf of Skills Victoria. Source: Monash Centre of Policy Studies, 2011

24 Occupation growth Monash projections show a decline in the top employing occupations growth over the period to | Source: Monash Centre of Policy Studies, 2011 Usage is restricted to the Department of Education & Early Childhood Development and third parties undertaking work on behalf of Skills Victoria.

25 Education

26 Industry Education attainment levels 26 | Overall there has been a slight decrease in VET enrolments for the industry in Hume. Despite this trend there has been an increase in enrolments in the Certificate II qualification. Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.

27 Age profile of enrolments The majority of VET enrolments are in the year old Age Group. The decrease in enrolments is generally evenly spread across age groups. 27 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.

28 Diversity of Enrolments The diversity of enrolments has increased in all categories. The greatest increase in diversity has been the increased proportion of CALD students. 28 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.

29 © Workforce Planning Australia - Accommodation and Food Occupational VET Education Data (Hume) Waiter Kitchen hand Cafe / Restaurant Manager

30 Waiter

31 Waiter VET Course Enrolments 31 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. There has been a significant increase in VET enrolments from Waiters over the period from This increase is attributable to growth in the Certificate III level qualification.

32 Waiter Age Profile of VET Enrolments 32 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. The majority of VET enrolments for waiters are in the year old Age Group. There has been significant growth in the year old Age Group.

33 Diversity of Waiter VET Enrolments 33 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. The diversity of enrolments for waiters has increased in all categories. The greatest increase in diversity has been the increased proportion of CALD students.

34 Kitchen hand

35 Kitchen hand VET Course Enrolments 35 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. There has been a decrease in VET enrolments from Kitchen hands over the period from The decrease is attributable to negative growth in the Certificate II level qualification.

36 Kitchen hand Age Profile of VET Enrolments 36 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. The majority of VET enrolments for Kitchen hands are in the year old Age Group. There has been a decline in all Age Groups over the period

37 Diversity of Kitchen hand VET Enrolments 37 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. The diversity of enrolments for kitchen hands has increased in all categories. The greatest increase in diversity has been the increased proportion of CALD students.

38 Cafe / Restaurant Manager

39 Cafe / Restaurant Manager VET Course Enrolments 39 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. There has been an increase in VET enrolments from Cafe / Restaurant Managers over the period from The increase is attributable to growth in the Certificate IV level qualification.

40 Cafe / Restaurant Manager Age Profile of VET Enrolments 40 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. The majority of VET enrolments for waiters are in the year old Age Group. There has been significant growth in the and year old Age Groups.

41 Diversity of Cafe / Restaurant Manager VET Enrolments 41 | Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria. The diversity of enrolments for Cafe / Restaurant Managers has decreased. The greatest decrease in diversity has been in the proportion of CALD students.

42 Findings

43 What this means Tourism and Hospitality statistics needs to be viewed with care because of the overlap between the industries The main area of growth in Australia have been: Cafes, Take away food services Business events Licensed travel agents Monash projections predict growth in Accommodation and Food jobs will peak in and then decline. The reason for this projected decline is unclear. The largest occupations are Waiters, Kitchen hands and Bar Attendants/Baristas Much of the tourism in Hume is focused on the small towns and natural resources. Growing areas of tourism are in specialised areas, such as nature-based tourism, cycling, food and wine, historic sites and snow sports. 43 |

44 What this means(Continued) Formal training in the field has been heavily focused on young people. This suggests there may be scope to look at other segments of the labour market, particularly mature aged workers. The growth in enrolments in Cert III level qualifications for waiters and Cert IV level qualifications for Cafe/Restaurants Managers will help build the capabilities of hospitality staff and lift the quality of service in the region. The data on training enrolments suggests there is a need to explore ways of increasing training opportunities for indigenous Hume residents. There may be scope to further develop Indigenous tourism in the Hume region. A particular challenge for Hume may be to work out ways to meet the needs of tourists from Asia, particularly people from China and India, if businesses in the area want to try and tap into this growing market identified by Tourism Victoria. 44 |

45 Questions? The location of employment in tourism in Hume raises questions about access to training by people living in the smaller towns. Is training provided on-site, at RTOs in regional towns, on-line or a combination of both using a blended approach? Is training available locally that focuses on the areas of potential growth e.g. nature-based tourism? Why has there been a decline in enrolments for Cafe/Restaurant managers among CALD groups at a time when there have been a rise in enrolments in waiter and kitchen hand courses among CALD groups? The seasonal nature of many of these jobs in Hume suggests the need to explore how local people can move between different areas of tourism, hospitality and events management so they have greater job security and the local industry grows a pool of workers with solid and diverse experience. How can this be achieved? 45 |


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