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Rubrics to Improve Student Learning and Performance What It is and how it is applied to STEM curriculum Created by The University of North Texas in partnership.

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Presentation on theme: "Rubrics to Improve Student Learning and Performance What It is and how it is applied to STEM curriculum Created by The University of North Texas in partnership."— Presentation transcript:

1 Rubrics to Improve Student Learning and Performance What It is and how it is applied to STEM curriculum Created by The University of North Texas in partnership with the Texas Education Agency

2 2 In reviewing the content of this professional development module it may be helpful for you to use the following tools to take notes, summarize key points and identify ideas to implement in your classroom: Cornell Notes ExampleCornell Notes ExampleSample Cornell Notes Sheet that demonstrates how to take notes, summarize key points, and identify specific ideas for implementation. Cornell Notes FormBlank Cornell Notes Sheet for use in taking notes, summarizing key points, and identifying specific ideas for implementation. Cornell Notes Form Cornell Notes Example Cornell Notes Form Mind Map ExampleMind Map ExampleExamples of how to use a mind map to take notes, summarize key points, and identify specific ideas for implementation. Mind Map Example Mind Map Blank FormMind Map Blank FormBlank Mind Map for use in taking notes, summarizing key points, and identifying specific ideas for implementation. Mind Map Blank Form Action PlanAction PlanForm to use in taking ideas for implementation from the professional development module (from Cornell Notes Sheet and/or Mind Map ) and planning to implement them in your classroom. Action Plan UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

3 3 What is a Rubric? A set of scoring guidelines for judging student work of performance-based tasks. Answers the question: What do proficiency, and varying degrees of proficiency, at a task look like? UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

4 4 About Rubrics Rubrics can be used to evaluate process and content. A scaled set of criteria defines, for students and teachers, what the range of an acceptable and unacceptable performance looks like. Is an authentic assessment tool useful in assessing criteria that are complex and subjective. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

5 5 About Rubrics The criteria provides descriptions of each level of performance in terms of what students are able to do; and, assign labels, such as: Excellent Proficient Unacceptable UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

6 6 About Rubrics Rubrics can be created by teachers, students, and/or interested parties. Rubrics provide a framework that assists teachers in evaluating student performance. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

7 7 Good Scoring Rubrics… Help teachers define excellence and plan how to help students achieve it. Communicate to students what excellence looks like and how to evaluate their own work. Communicate goals and results to parents, employees, and others. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

8 8 Good Scoring Rubrics… Help teachers and raters to be accurate, unbiased, and consistent in scoring. Documents procedures used in making important judgments about students. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

9 9 Rubric By Multiple Assessors To review and critique work done according to designated standards for: Self-assessment Peer assessment Teacher assessment Other UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

10 10 Student Results They learn criteria for achievement levels and how to set clear goals for their own achievements and others. As they work with peers and teachers to develop rubrics, the sense of collaboration and ownership in their learning becomes very important to them. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

11 11 Advantages of Using Rubrics More objective and consistent assessment. Helps teachers/students define quality. Clearly shows students how work will be evaluated and what is expected. Helps students accept responsibility for their own learning. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

12 12 More Advantages Provides useful feedback regarding effectiveness of instruction. Reduces time teachers spend grading student work. Easier for teachers to explain to students why they received grade, and what they can do to improve. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

13 13 Rubric Template Task Statement:________________________________________________ Task Assignment:_______________________________________________ Criteria Levels Concepts Skills Novice 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Total Score:

14 14 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 1: Review TEKS, learning outcomes, performance, and products for your curriculum/course. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

15 15 STEM Application STEP 1: Review TEKS for Architectural Graphics , such as… (2) (A) Develop, or, improve architectural drawings that conform to industry standards; (5) (B) Use a variety of architectural graphics tools, equipment, and machines (traditional and computer-based) to produce drawings or models; (8) (B) Participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated architectural graphics project; and, (12) (D) Use the appropriate scales for measuring. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

16 16 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 2: Determine the skill, product, process, or performance for which the rubric is to be written. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

17 17 STEM Application Step 2: The student will design and draw a house plan that shows the location and dimensions of exterior and interior walls, windows, doors, appliances, cabinets, fireplaces, and other fixtures of the students dream house, meeting guidelines that must be satisfied. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

18 18 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 3: Determine intended use(s) of rubric: Teacher scoring tool Expert evaluator scoring tool Student coaching tool Peer or self-evaluation tool Combination of above UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

19 19 STEM Application Step 3: The rubric will be used as: Teacher scoring tool *** Student coaching tool Self-evaluation tool ***Later, we will address Numerical Scales. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

20 20 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 4: Develop a specific Task Statement that reflects both cognitive and performance components of task. Place Task Statement at top of rubric. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

21 21 STEM Application Step 4: Task Statement: Design and draw a floor plan of your dream house. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

22 22 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 5: Specify the general requirements for the task in a Task Assignment statement. Place the Task Assignment statement under the Task Statement. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

23 23 STEM Application Step 5: Task Statement: Design and draw a floor plan of my dream house. Task Assignment: Show location and dimensions of exterior and interior walls, windows, doors, appliances, cabinets, fireplaces, and other fixtures of my dream house, meeting required guidelines. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

24 24 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 6: Identify most important concepts or skills being assessed in the task. These should be placed in spaces going down left side of rubric. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

25 25 STEM Application STEP 6: Concepts/Skills to be assessed: Determining style and shape of house based on the property upon which it is located. Identifying areas of house based on required guidelines. Showing traffic flow in design. Dimensioning and labeling drawing. Justifying plan by explaining why portions are located where, and why certain dimensions are what they are. Defining terms used in construction industry used to identify parts of the construction. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

26 26 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 7: Identify criteria levels for the task. Criteria levels should be listed across top of rubric from lowest quality level the far left to highest quality level at far right. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

27 27 Highest Quality Level Highest quality level defines superior A work. Exemplary Exceptional Advanced Fantastic Outstanding Impressive Super World Class Topnotch UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

28 28 2nd Highest Quality Level 2nd highest level defines high quality; what one might say is high B work. Accomplished Skilled Proficient Effective Efficient Successful Masterful Talented Competent UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

29 29 3rd Highest Quality Level 3rd highest level defines mediocre quality; what one might say is high C or D work. Developing Adequate Acceptable Amateur Apprentice Passable Respectable Presentable Satisfactory UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

30 30 4th Highest Quality Level 4th highest level defines weak quality work; what one might say is D or F work. Novice Discovering Awareness Beginner Not-Yet Incomplete Emerging Intermediate Needs Work UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

31 31 STEM Application STEP 7: Criteria levels for Floor Plan Rubric : Exemplary – highest quality level Accomplished – 2 nd highest quality level Developing – 3 rd highest quality level Novice – 4 th highest quality level UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

32 32 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 8: Describe qualifications for concepts/skills listed down the left side of rubric for each identified criteria level listed across top of rubric. Descriptions should specifically identify the behavior, performance, product the learner has attained. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

33 33 STEM Application STEP 8: Qualification description: Determine the style and shape of house based on property upon which it is located. Novice – Little regard given to the property. Developing – Style and shape based only on the size of the property. Accomplished – Style and shape of house works with the propertys size and shape. Exemplary – Style and shape enhances the property. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

34 34 STEM Application STEP 8: Complete quality description for remaining concepts/skills listed below: Identify areas of the house… Show traffic flow … Dimension and label drawing… Justify plan by explaining why … Define various terms used… UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

35 35 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 9: Numerical Scales use numbers or assign points to a continuum of performance levels. Clearly label and define points Avoid scales with more than 6-7 points Have as many points as can be well defined, and cover the range from poor to excellent performance UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

36 36 STEM Application Step 9: A Numerical Scales: Levels of quality for each criteria described in Step 7 could be organized as: Lowest level to Highest level UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

37 37 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 10: Rethink your scale: Does a ( )- point scale differentiate enough between types of student work to satisfy you? Adjust the scale if necessary. Reassess student work and score it against the developing rubric. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

38 38 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 11: Evaluate the rubric. Does rubric relate to outcome(s) being measured? Does it cover important dimensions of student performance? Do criteria reflect excellence in the field? Are categories, or scales, well defined? Is there a clear basis for assigning scores at each scale point? Is rubric useful, feasible, manageable, and practical? UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

39 39 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 12: Test the rubric with students. When rubrics are not clear, teachers and students become frustrated and/or disappointed. Students dont enjoy working hard, thinking theyre getting it right, and finding out that it isnt. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

40 40 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 13: Keep track of the strengths and shortcomings of the rubric when you use it to assess student work. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

41 41 Steps in Creating A Rubric Step 14: Revise the rubric as necessary. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

42 42 Scoring and Grading Key Points: Criteria seldom considered equal value. Determine if all quality levels are eligible for points. Criteria at 2 nd or 3 rd lowest level may not be considered score-able. Efforts below score-able level may be considered not yet and students are expected to refine until reaches score-able. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

43 43 STEM Application The criteria used in the Floor Plan could be weighted as follows: POINTSCRITERIA 30Determining style and shape of house 20Identifying areas of house based 15Showing traffic flow in the design 15Dimensioning and labeling the drawing 10Justifying plan 10Defining terms used in construction industry UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

44 44 STEM Application See Job Aid: Floor Plan Rubric. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

45 45 Methods for Converting Rubric Scores to Grades Various Methods Include: Rated Checklists Weighted Checklists Fixed percent scale Total Point Standards-based UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

46 46 Total Point Method Students earn points for each concept, or skill, to be assessed. Point values should be determined prior to starting the assignment. Points should be worded in the positive. A project may be worth 100 points. Total points add up to a number that can be converted to a percentage. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

47 47 Stem Application See Job Aid for The Floor Plan: Totaling Points Example UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

48 48 Free Rubric Builder Sites Rubistar: iRubric: My Teacher Tools: Rubrics4teachers: UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

49 49 References Health Science Technology Education Assessment Tools. CD-ROM Rubistar: iRubric: My Teacher Tools: Rubrics4teachers: UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.


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