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Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health The Next Disaster: Are You As A Nurse Prepared? Welcome to the Ohio Nurses Association.

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Presentation on theme: "Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health The Next Disaster: Are You As A Nurse Prepared? Welcome to the Ohio Nurses Association."— Presentation transcript:

1 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health The Next Disaster: Are You As A Nurse Prepared? Welcome to the Ohio Nurses Association

2 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Why are we concerned about disasters? According to FEMA, Major Disaster Declarations have steadily increased since 1953 #13 in 1953 #81 in 2010 #99 in 2011 #47 in 2012 #11 in 2013 as of 2 Apr 2013 and climbing (Oklahoma – May 20, 2013) Are You Prepared?

3 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health #1 Disaster in Ohio

4 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health #1 Disaster in Ohio – Severe Storms

5 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Objective Objective – Describe steps nurses can take to be better prepared both personally and professionally for a disaster

6 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Getting Informed – know the warning systems and signals for your area –National weather service –Television announcements –Radio announcements

7 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Evacuating yourself and your family. Hold a family meeting to discuss where you would all meet to evacuate from these locations: –Your home and community –Your childrens schools –Your place of work

8 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Evacuating yourself and your family out of the community – Escape Routes –Near the home –In the local community –Outside the community

9 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Evacuating yourself and your co-workers out of the workplace – Escape Routes, i.e. which stairwell do you use? What if its blocked? –Near your workplace – have you identified a gathering place? i.e. a certain corner of the parking lot –In the local community – i.e. another facility, a certain building? –Outside the community – another town or city?

10 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Family Communications Complete a contact card for each family member –Set cell phones with ICE cell phone numbers ICE = In Case of Emergency

11 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Locate Utility Shut-offs –Natural Gas –Water –Electricity Find these items in your home – know how to shut them off

12 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Insurance and Vital Records Flood Insurance – Do you need it? –Inventory Home/Work Possessions –Important Documents –Money Keep important items in a safe and secure location, i.e. safe, safe-deposit box

13 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Special Needs –Disability/Special Needs, i.e. sight and/or hearing impaired, mobility impaired, etc

14 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Caring for Animals –Shelter for Pets –Pet Supplies including food, medications –Pet ID tags –Pet Carriers/leashes

15 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Caring for Animals –Veterinary records (most kennels will require records) –What hotels/motels allow pets? –Emergency Shelters may not allow pets Check these out BEFORE a disaster!

16 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Safety Skills –Learn CPR and Basic First Aid –Obtain and Know How to use a Fire Extinguisher

17 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit –Home, Work, Vehicle Keep it simple – food, water, basic first aid supplies, clothing

18 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Home Disaster Kit

19 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Home Disaster Kit

20 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Home Disaster Kit

21 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Home/Work Disaster Kit

22 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Home/Work Disaster Kit

23 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Water –How much? One gallon per person per day –How should it be stored? Best – commercially bottled water –Remember: even bottled water has an expiration date. Rotate bottled water as necessary –Store in containers you can lift and move

24 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Food –Avoid foods that make you thirsty (i.e. choose low sodium foods) –Stock foods that require no refrigeration –Canned goods, dry mixes (dont forget the can opener and dont forget that dry mixes will require water to reconstitute) –Store items in pest-proof containers

25 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Food Quiz Which of these foods would you choose to have in your disaster kit?

26 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Food Quiz - Answers There is no perfect food to put in your disaster kit. Consider the following: 1)What foods will you and/or your family eat? – no sense putting items in your disaster kit that no one will eat 2)Food allergies – keep this in mind as your decide on food items 3)Does a food item require special preparation?

27 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Food Quiz - Answers There is no perfect food to put in your disaster kit. Consider the following: 4) Is the food item too heavy to carry long distances? 5) Cost – can you afford special survival foods? 6) Food items expire – keep track and rotate Bottom line: Pack what you and your family can and will eat

28 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Issues to consider when choosing food items: 1) Size 2) Cost 3) Weight 4) Shelf life 5) Movement 6) Likes/dislikes by family members 7) Ease of use/Food preparation requirements 8) Medical concerns of family members, i.e. allergies

29 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Food –What foods should you store? Best determined by family needs and desires, i.e. allergy issues, diabetic foods Based on family use, provide a 3-day supply of food items Commercially available disaster foods are good – but costly and some do not taste very good. Sold at sporting goods stores, some grocery stores Remember: Food items have expiration dates!!

30 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Basic Disaster Supplies Kit Three-day supply of food and water Portable, battery operated radio/TV Flashlight/extra batteries (rotate every 6 months) First aid kit and manual Hygiene items Matches/lighter Whistle Extra Clothing

31 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Basic Disaster Supplies Kit Kitchen accessories/cooking utensils –Photocopies of credit cards/ID cards –Cash and coins (how much?) –Special needs items (prescription meds, eye glasses) –Items for infants –Other items as needed

32 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Basic Disaster Supplies Kit –Clothing: Needs to be seasonal Cold weather items –Coats/sweaters if power goes off –Long pants/shirts –Extra sturdy shoes –Hats, mittens, gloves –Sleeping bag or blankets for each person

33 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Maintaining Your Disaster Supplies Kit Store food items in climate controlled conditions Store food items in pest-proof containers (metal if possible) Discard canned goods that swell, get dented or corroded Watch for expiration dates on food items – keep a list Rotate food/water every 6 months (per expiration dates) Update items as family needs change Place items in containers that are easy to carry/move, i.e. ice chest on wheels, boxes that fit on a small cart or dolly, backpack

34 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Shelter – be prepared to move to appropriate shelters –Manage water carefully –Obtain water from reliable sources –Manage food supplies carefully –Cook safely –Store food safely

35 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Dont forget your motor vehicles!!! –First Aid Kit –Non-Latex Gloves –Emergency Tool –Seasonable supplies $15-$20 at most automotive or discount stores

36 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Preparing Your Home/Work Practice Your Home/Work Safety Plan!!!!!!!!!!!

37 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural & Man-Made Disasters

38 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Natural hazards are natural events that threaten lives, property, and other assets. Often natural hazards can be predicted. They tend to occur repeatedly in the same geographical locations because they are related to weather patterns or physical characteristics of an area.

39 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Tornadoes Forrest Fires Blizzards Flooding Hurricanes

40 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Earthquakes Dust storms Tsunamis Volcanoes

41 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Floods: the most common hazard in the United States. Some floods develop slowly, others can happen very quickly with devastating effect. Flash floods are particularly dangerous. Not just from the wall of fast moving water but also from the debris, rocks and mud that often accompany flash floods.

42 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Flood terminology: –Flood watch: Flooding is possible. Tune in to a NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio or television for information –Flash flood watch: Flash flooding is possible. Be prepared to move to higher ground; listen to NOAA Weather radio, commercial radio or television for information –Flood warning: Flooding is occurring or will occur soon; if advised to evacuate, do so immediately –Flash flood warning: A flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately

43 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Lesson 2 - Natural Hazards

44 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards

45 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards If a flood is likely in your area: –Listen to the radio or television for instructions –Be aware of the potential for flash flooding near your home –Be aware of the potential for flash flooding in areas you might be traveling through as you evacuate

46 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Evacuation tips: –Do NOT try to walk through moving water!!! Six inches of fast-flowing water can knock you down. If you must walk through water, stick to non-moving water and use a stick to probe the ground ahead of you. –Do NOT drive into flooded areas or across flooded streets - Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most cars –A foot of water will float most vehicles –Two feet of moving water can sweep your car away

47 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards

48 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards

49 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards After a flood: Dont drink tap water until instructed it is safe to do so Avoid floodwaters – may be contaminated by raw sewage, gasoline, oil, etc Be aware of areas where floodwaters may have receded – roads may be weakened Stay away from downed power lines Return home when told it is safe to do so Clean and disinfect anything that got wet – water and mud may contain chemicals, raw sewage, etc.

50 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Be aware of the following: –Flood losses are generally NOT covered by your homeowners insurance – you need to check before a flood happens to you –Flood insurance can be obtained through selected insurance agents –There is usually a 30-day waiting period before flood insurance goes into effect

51 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Flood Quiz – True or False 1.Flood emergencies occur in only 12 states. 2.A Flood Watch announcement on the radio indicates that a flood is possible. 3.Flash floods may occur with little warning. 4.Flood risk varies from one region to another. 5.National flood insurance is available only for buildings within an identified flood- prone area. 6.It is safe to walk through floodwater if you can see the ground under it. 7.It takes at least 3 feet of floodwater to make a motorized vehicle float. 8.After flood waters recede from a roadway, the road could still be dangerous. 9.To prepare for a flood emergency, you should have a NOAA Weather radio as well as a commercial radio.

52 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Flood Quiz – True or False 1.Flood emergencies occur in only 12 states. FALSE 2.A Flood Watch announcement on the radio indicates that a flood is possible. TRUE 3.Flash floods may occur with little warning. TRUE 4.Flood risk varies from one region to another. TRUE 5.National flood insurance is available only for buildings within an identified flood- prone area. FALSE 6.It is safe to walk through floodwater if you can see the ground under it. FALSE 7.It takes at least 3 feet of floodwater to make a motorized vehicle float. FALSE 8.After flood waters recede from a roadway, the road could still be dangerous. TRUE 9.To prepare for a flood emergency, you should have a NOAA Weather radio as well as a commercial radio. TRUE

53 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Tornadoes: natures MOST violent storms. Tornadoes have occurred in ALL 50 states. Some tornadoes allow for advance warning due to observed weather systems – i.e. storm cells developing in an area Some tornadoes give little to no warning

54 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Additional tornado facts: –Tornadoes may appear transparent until they pick up debris –The average tornado moves SW to NE but tornadoes have been known to move in any direction –Tornadoes can accompany tropical storms and hurricanes –Peak tornado season in the midwest is late spring through early summer

55 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Tornado terminology: Tornado watch: tornadoes are possible. Remain alert for approaching storms. Tune in to radio, TV for info Tornado warning: a tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. Take shelter immediately!!

56 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards During a tornado: Seek shelter immediately If in a building – go to the designated shelter area – avoid windows – avoid unsupported brick or masonry walls – get under a sturdy table If in a vehicle, trailer or mobile home – get out! Get to the lowest area possibly – preferably a building If outside with no shelter – lie flat in a ditch – avoid overpasses or bridges Never try to outrun a tornado Watch out for flying debris

57 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Preparing a tornado safe room: –Can be built in a basement, atop a concrete slab or garage floor or in an interior room on the first floor –Safe rooms below ground offer the most protection –See: Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room Inside Your House

58 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Hurricanes Hurricane Ike was the third costliest hurricane ever to make landfall in the United States. Early on Sept. 14, 2008 Ike merged with a large cold front moving from west to east over the central U.S. and became extra tropical. Who says we dont have hurricanes in Ohio???

59 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Hurricanes –Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale Category 174-95 MPH WindsMinimal Category 296-110 MPH WindsModerate Category 3111-130 MPH WindsExtensive Category 4131-155 MPH WindsExtreme Category 5More than 155Catastrophic

60 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Thunderstorms and Lightning All thunderstorms are dangerous and produce lightning In the US, 300 people injured and 80 killed/year Thunderstorms are often associated with tornadoes, strong winds, hail and flash flooding Flash Flooding kills more people (140/year) than any other thunderstorm-associated hazard http://blogs.sundaymercury.net/brummie-broad/2008/07/struck-by-lightning.html

61 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Thunderstorm Facts: –Lightning is extremely unpredictable –Lightning can occur as far as 10 miles away from rain –Most lightning deaths and injuries occur in the summer months during the afternoon and evening –Lightning strike victims carry no electrical charge and should be treated immediately

62 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Thunderstorm Terms: –Severe Thunderstorm Watch: Tells you when and where severe thunderstorms are likely to occur –Severe Thunderstorm Warning: Issued when severe weather has been reported by spotters or indicated by radar. Warnings include imminent danger to life and property

63 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Protective Measures for Thunderstorms: –Prior to thunderstorms remove dead branches from trees that could fall and cause injury during a storm –Remember the 30/30 rule: go indoors if, after seeing lightning, you cannot count to 30 before hearing thunder. Stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder.

64 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Protective Measures for Thunderstorms in your area: –Postpone outdoor activities –Get inside –Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage –Avoid showering or bathing – can conduct electricity –Dont use corded phones – use cell phones –Protect electrical items from power surges

65 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Lightning Quiz – True or False 1.Every thunderstorm produces lightning. 2.Never touch a person struck by lightning. 3.Dry, cold conditions favor development of a thunderstorm. 4.If you can count to 25 after seeing lightning and before hearing thunder, it is safe to stay outdoors. 5.It is safe to use a cordless phone during a thunderstorm. 6.Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide protection from lightning.

66 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Lightning Quiz – True or False 1.Every thunderstorm produces lightning. TRUE 2.Never touch a person struck by lightning. FALSE 3.Dry, cold conditions favor development of a thunderstorm. FALSE 4.If you can count to 25 after seeing lightning and before hearing thunder, it is safe to stay outdoors. FALSE 5.It is safe to use a cordless phone during a thunderstorm. TRUE 6.Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide protection from lightning. FALSE

67 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Winter Storms and Extreme Cold - Terminology Freezing Rain: rain that freezes when it hits the ground creating a coating on the ground Sleet: rain that turns to ice pellets before reaching the ground Winter Storm Watch: a winter storm is possible Winter Storm Warning: A winter storm is occurring Blizzard Warning: sustained winds or gusts to 35 MPH and large amounts of snowfall for 3 >hrs Frost/Freeze Warning: { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@type": "ImageObject", "contentUrl": "http://images.slideplayer.com/5/1575925/slides/slide_67.jpg", "name": "Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Winter Storms and Extreme Cold - Terminology Freezing Rain: rain that freezes when it hits the ground creating a coating on the ground Sleet: rain that turns to ice pellets before reaching the ground Winter Storm Watch: a winter storm is possible Winter Storm Warning: A winter storm is occurring Blizzard Warning: sustained winds or gusts to 35 MPH and large amounts of snowfall for 3 >hrs Frost/Freeze Warning: hrs Frost/Freeze Warning:

68 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Winter Storms and Extreme Cold – Protective Measures: Keep rock salt to melt ice on walkways Use sand to improve traction Have snow shovels or other snow removal equipment Make sure your home survival kit is winterized

69 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Winterize your vehicles: Keep car battery clean and operational Ensure antifreeze levels are adequate Replace windshield wipers as necessary Ensure windshield washer fluids are adequate Ensure car thermostat works properly Check car lights and hazard lights Check brakes – consider snow tires Keep emergency supplies in car to include food, water and cold weather clothing – especially if traveling

70 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Winterize yourself!!! Dress appropriately Keep your head covered Mittens are warmer than gloves (why?) Avoid overexertion Watch for signs of hypothermia, i.e. uncontrollable shivering, slurred speech, disorientation, drowsiness

71 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards During a winter storm: Listen to weather channels for advisories – dont go out if the weather is bad!! Dont get dehydrated Stay with your vehicle if you get stranded – its much easier to find by rescue personnel Let friends, family know your itinerary if traveling during bad weather

72 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Extreme Heat: High heat with high humidity is a killer! Dont get dehydrated Even in Ohio – heat can kill!

73 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Extreme Heat Terminology: Heat Wave - Prolonged period of excessive heat Heat Index – A number in degrees Fahrenheit that tells how hot it feels when relative humidity is added to the air temperature Heat Cramps – Muscular pains/spasms due to heavy exertion. A first signal the body is in danger from heat Heat Exhaustion – combination of dehydration and a warm environment; cool, pale, moist skin, rapid pulse Heat Stroke – can follow untreated heat exhaustion. Bodies cooling system fails leading to excessive body heat – death if untreated

74 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Extreme Heat Protective Measures Stay indoors as much as possible Drink plenty of water Limit intake of alcohol Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing Never leave small children or pets in closed vehicles Bottom line – dont go out into extreme heat unless absolutely necessary and then stay hydrated!!!

75 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards First Aid for Heat Induced Illnesses: Take cooling showers for sunburn and overheating Loosen or remove clothing Give sips of cool (not cold) water – consume slowly Discontinue water if nausea develops Seek immediate medical attention if nausea develops Call 911 or get victim to a hospital if body temp >105

76 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Earthquakes: YES – they can and have happened in Ohio!!!

77 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Earthquake Terminology: Earthquake – a sudden slipping or movement of a portion of the earths crust followed by vibrations Aftershock – an earthquake of similar or lesser intensity that follows the main earthquake Fault – a fracture across the earths surface during an earthquake Epicenter – the point above the actual earthquake Seismic Waves – vibrations that travel from the quake Magnitude – the amount of energy released. Richter Scale.

78 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Earthquake Preparation: Locate safe spots in your home/work to seek shelter – before an earthquake occurs Place large and heavy objects on lower shelves Secure items that could fall during an earthquake Hold earthquake drills in your home (along with all the other drills, i.e. tornadoes, floods – make a party of it!!)

79 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards During an Earthquake: If indoors Take cover under sturdy objects, i.e. desk, table or against an inside wall Stay away from glass, i.e. windows, mirrors Stay away from outside walls, light fixtures or anything that could fall on you Stay inside until the shaking stops and it is safe to go out Do NOT use elevators

80 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards During an Earthquake: If outdoors Stay outside! Move away from buildings, light poles, utility wires Dont go inside any structures until they are deemed safe to enter

81 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards During an Earthquake: If in a vehicle Stay there! Stop as quickly as possible – dont stop under overpasses, light poles, trees or under utility wires Proceed cautiously once an earthquake has stopped but watch carefully for road and/or bridge damage

82 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards During an Earthquake: If trapped under debris Dont move! You may cause more debris to fall Do NOT light a match or lighter Tap on a wall or pipe to alert rescuers to your presence (…---… = SOS)

83 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards After an Earthquake: Be prepared for aftershocks Open cabinets carefully Stay away from damaged areas Haiti Earthquake, 2010

84 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Volcanoes: Not very likely in Ohio or the mid-west – but if traveling to areas that do have volcanoes – follow local guidance http://www.centennial.k12.mn.us/BHE/Archives/Activities/Disaster/volcano2.jpg

85 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Landslides and Debris Flows: Can occur in all 50 states Be aware of surrounding areas near your home that could develop into landslides

86 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Tsunamis: Not very likely in Ohio or the mid-west – but if traveling to areas that do have Tsunamis – follow local guidance http://scrapetv.com/News/News%20Pages/Everyone%20Else/pages-3/New-Zealand-comes-within-richter- points-of-a-tsunami-Scrape-TV-The-World-on-your-side.html

87 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Fires: Each year 4,000 people die in fires and 25,000 are injured. Property loss estimated at $8.6 Billion annually Fire moves very swiftly More people die from asphyxiation than the fire itself Bottom line – get away from fire ASAP!!

88 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Fires: Protective Measures Install smoke detectors at every level in your home Change the batteries at least once a year and test them

89 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Fires: Escaping a fire Review escape routes with your family – know where to meet Make sure you have escape methods out of your house – windows, doors you can get out of Consider escape ladders – especially if bedrooms are on a second or higher floor

90 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Fires: Flammable Items Never use flammable liquids indoors Store flammable liquids in approved containers in well- ventilated areas Never smoke near flammable liquids (youd be surprised how many people actually do this!!) Discard oily rags or materials in safe, fire-proof containers Make sure chimneys are properly cared for

91 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Fires: Heating Sources Be VERY careful using alternate heating sources Keep heaters away from flammable materials Store fireplace ashes in metal containers – outside – not in the house Have heating units inspected and cleaned as needed

92 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Fires: Other concerns Keep lighters/matches away from children Dont smoke in bed or if drowsy Sleep with bedroom doors closed Install fire extinguishers in house – know how to use them

93 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Fires: If you catch on fire Stop, Drop, and Roll Do NOT run

94 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Fires: During a fire Check doors for heat before you open them Hot door – dont open! Cool door – open very slowly and carefully Crawl low to escape Call 911

95 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Natural Hazards Wild Fires:

96 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Man-Made Hazards Intentional or Accidental?

97 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Intentional Hazards WMD: – Chemical (i.e. Sarin gas attack in Tokyo, 1995) – Biological (i.e. Salmonella poisoning, Oregon, 1984) – Radiological (i.e. Dirty bombs) – Nuclear (i.e. Hiroshima and Nagasaki, WWII) – Explosive (Boston Marathon bombing, 2013)

98 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Accidental Hazards Chemical Spills (i.e. Bhopal, India, 1984) Building Collapse (i.e. Kansas City, MO, 1981) Oil Tanker Spill (Exxon Valdez, 1989) Air Ship (Hindenberg, 1937) Aircraft disasters (Canary Islands, 1977)

99 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Are You Prepared???

100 Wright State University – Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health Questions?


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