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Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

2 Purpose of This Workshop This workshop is designed for people who want a discussion of Modern Language Association (MLA) documentation that they can go through at their own pace. If you want a more thorough discussion, please click here to find a video with audio commentary of this same PowerPoint presentation.video with audio commentary A list of all Writing Lab video and PowerPoint workshops is available on the Writing Lab Portal Page as well. Please note that you will need to log in to access any of our presentations. For two additional terrific sources on MLA documentation, please consult these websites: Purdue University Online Writing Lab Diana Hackers Online Writing Handbook Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

3 Sample Works Cited Templates You can select a link below to get information on a particular source. To get back to this page, select the symbol next to the title of each slide. Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College WEBSITES AND ELECTRONIC SOURCES Article with One to Three Authors Article with Four or More Authors Article with No Named Author Listserv Posting Discussion Group Posting Blog Posting Digital Files (PDFs, MP3s, JPEG etc.) PRINT JOURNALS, MAGAZINES, AND NEWSPAPERS Journals versus Magazines Article in a Journal Article in a Journal Article in a Magazine Article in a Newspaper ONLINE JOURNALS, MAGAZINES, AND NEWSPAPERS Journals versus Magazines Article in CQ Researcher Article in Ebscohost Article in InfoTrac Article in LexisNexis Article in Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center Article in WilsonSelectPlus PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS Personal or Telephone Interview Message or Personal Letter Lecture Notes from a Class Survey BOOKS AND OTHER REFERENCE TEXTS Book with One to Three Authors Book with One to Three Authors Book with Four or More Authors Book with Four or More Authors Book with No Named Author Book with No Named Author Two or More Books by the Same Author Two or More Books by the Same Author Article from an Anthology Article in a Reference Book Pamphlet or Brochure MULTIMEDIA SOURCES Television Program Film Music or Audio Recording

4 Citing Books and Other Reference Texts A Works Cited entry for a book generally requires the following information: Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of Author or Authors Title of the Book italicized City of publication Publisher copyright year Source for image: lifehack.org Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

5 Book with One to Three Authors Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of First Author, First Name Middle Initial Last Name of Second Author, and First Name Middle Initial Last Name of Third Author. Title of Book. City of publication: Publisher, copyright year. Print. If you cannot find a copyright year, use n.d. (which stands for no date) instead. Dobson, Janice. The Problem with Bad Neighbors. Milwaukee: Grant Publications, Print. Doud, Brian J., Jill M. Wagner, and Jonathan L. Hostager. Reunions and Regrets. Ames: Iowa State University Publishing, Print. Source for image: myupperwest.com Source for image: dallaslibrary2.org Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

6 Book with Four or More Authors When a book has four or more authors, we use a shorthand code called et al. to represent the names of the rest of the authors. The words et al. are Latin for and others. First, find the name of the first author listed on the original book. Next, list the source alphabetically by that authors last name. Finally, add the words et al. following the authors name. If you cannot find a copyright year, use n.d. (which stands for no date) instead. Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of First Author., et al. Title of Book. City of publication: Publisher, copyright year. Print. Koenigs, Laurie J., et al. Rockabilly Days and Nights. Chicago: LaJon Publications, Print. Source for image: impawards.com Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

7 Book with No Named Author For a book with no clearly named author, just omit the author and alphabetize the source by the first major word of the title (not counting A, And, and The). Title of Book. City of publication: Publisher, copyright year. Print. Mad Men and Ad Men: An Exploration of Sexism, Boozing, Schmoozing, and Cruising. Las Vegas: Bradshaw and Quinn Publications, Print. Note: If you cannot find a copyright year, use n.d. (which stands for no date) instead. Source of image: theghostwriterinthemachine.blogspot.com Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

8 Two or More Books by Same Author When you have two books written by the same author, list the books alphabetically by the first major word of the title not counting A, An, and The). For the second listing, replace the authors name with three hyphens and a period: ---. Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of Author. Title of Book. City of publication: Publisher, copyright year. Print. Larsson, Stieg. The Girl Who Played with Fire. New York: Vintage Crime, Print The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. New York: Vintage Crime, Print. Source for image: daemonsbooks.com Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

9 Article from an Anthology An anthology is a collection of articles written by many different authors which have been collected into one volume and edited by someone. Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of Specific Articles Author. Title of Article. Title of Book. Ed. First Name Middle Initial Last Name of Editor if listed. City of publication: Publisher, copyright year. Page numbers. Print. Briener, Mary Ellen. The History of the March of Dimes. Charitable Organizations in America. Ed. David S. Henderson. San Francisco: Candlestick Publications, Print. Note: If you cannot find a copyright year, use n.d. (which stands for no date) instead. Note: An anthology is the only type of book for which you list page numbers (for the individual article you are citing). Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

10 Article in a Reference Book For dictionaries, encyclopedias, almanacs, atlases, and other reference texts, use the following format. If you cannot find a copyright year, use n.d. (which stands for no date) instead. Entry Title. Title of Reference Book. Edition number (if present). Volume number (if listed). Copyright year. Print. Migraines. Stedman's Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing. 6 th ed. Vol Print. Fascism. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. 3rd ed Print. Note: When citing reference texts, omit city of publication and publisher details. Note: Individual authors are rare for reference texts, but if a source has an author, put the authors name before the title just as you would with any written or electronic source. Source for Image: librarykvpattom.wordpress.com Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

11 Pamphlet or Brochure Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of Author. Title of Publication. City of publication: Publisher, date of publication. Print. If you cannot find a copyright year, use n.d. (which stands for no date) instead. Parkland College. Fire Science Program. Champaign: Parkland College Marketing, (2007). Print. Source for image: magazineracks.com Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

12 Citing an Article in a Print Journal, Magazine, or Newspaper An entry for an article in a print journal, magazine, or newspaper generally requires the following information: Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of author or authors Article Title in quotation marks Name of journal, magazine, or newspaper in italics Volume and issue (Date in parentheses) Page numbers Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

13 Journals Versus Magazines Source for image: iol.utexas.edu Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College JournalsMagazines Journal articles generally have been peer reviewed. This means that the articles have been studied by a panel of professionals in a particular field to assure the accuracy and credibility of the information presented. Magazine articles generally have received some screening but often are not written by experts in the field. Rather, many magazine articles are written by freelance or staff writers who research and write about a wide variety of topics. Journal articles are usually longer and more complex than magazines that are read for everyday fun. Magazine articles generally cover just a few pages or even fewer and are written at roughly a tenth to twelfth grade reading level, so the articles arent overly complicated. Journal articles generally have few pictures or other images unless the graphics are part of a particular article (such as a pie chart or bar graph showing statistical information). Magazines generally have lots of colorful graphics and are printed on glossy paper. Journals usually have little advertising unless the advertisements are directly related to the field, such as advertisements for professional conferences and other scholarly books and publications. Magazines generally have a lot of different advertisements, usually in relation to the readership of the magazine such as ads for womens clothing, makeup, and jewelry targeted for readers of fashion magazines

14 Article in a Journal Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of Author. Article Title. Name of Journal volume number.issue number (date of publication): pages. Print. Morrison, Jennifer B. Wireless Technology and the New American Revolution. Journal of Advanced Technological Practices 53.7 (2007): Print. Claude, Roy, et al. "Medical Students Perceptions of Nutrition Education in Canadian Universities." Applied Physiology, Nutrition & Metabolism 35.3 (2010): Print. Note: et al. means and others and is used for four or more authors. Also, use the name of the first listed author on the original text in your Works Cited entry. Source for image: iol.utexas.edu Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

15 Article in a Magazine Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of Author. Article Title. Name of Magazine Volume.Issue (if present) (Date): pages. Print. Wilson, Kathryn. Global Warming and its Effects on Polar Bears. U.S. World and News Report (27 Feb. 2007): Print. Mannie, Ken E. et al. "Athletic Nutrition Bytes: Fueling the Body for Competition." Coach & Athletic Director 77.5 (22 Jan. 2007): Print. Note: et al. means and others and is used for four or more authors. Also, use the name of the first listed author on the original text in your Works Cited entry. Source for both images: life.com Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

16 Article in a Newspaper Last Name, First Name Middle Initial of Author. Article Title. Name of Newspaper [name of city of publication if it isnt not part of the title] date of newspaper, edition [if newspaper appears in different editions such as early/late, morning/evening]: pages. Print. Cornelius, Coleman K. "Bozo the Clown: A Life with Big Shoes and a Red Nose." The News Gazette [Champaign] 9 Jan. 1999: A6+. Print. Note: A6+ means article began on page A6 and appeared in a non-continuous order until ending on page A14. Fagan, Gabrielle, et al., Health: What All Women Should Know about Breast Cancer. Birmingham Post 2 Oct. 2004, early edition: B7+. Print. Note: et al. means and others and is used for four or more authors. Also, use the name of the first listed author on the original text in your Works Cited entry. Note: B7+ means article began on page B7 and appeared in a non-continuous order until ending on page B11. Source for image in banner: presentationmagazine.com Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College

17 What To Do if You Still Have Questions If you still have questions, please stop by the Writing Lab (D120). We are here to help. The librarians in the Parkland College Library are also here to provide assistance. Finally, please check out our list of writing workshops on the Writing Lab Portal Page. Thank you for your time today. Good luck with all of your writing projects.Writing Lab Portal Page Copyright 2011 by Angela M. Gulick, Parkland College


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