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The San Francisco Littoral Cell CRMSP Public Outreach Meeting July 12, 2012 (San Francisco) July 19, 2012 (Pacifica) Doug George and Bob Battalio, ESA.

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Presentation on theme: "The San Francisco Littoral Cell CRMSP Public Outreach Meeting July 12, 2012 (San Francisco) July 19, 2012 (Pacifica) Doug George and Bob Battalio, ESA."— Presentation transcript:

1 The San Francisco Littoral Cell CRMSP Public Outreach Meeting July 12, 2012 (San Francisco) July 19, 2012 (Pacifica) Doug George and Bob Battalio, ESA PWA Athena Honore, ABAG

2 Essentials for Tonight This Project: develop a coastal regional sediment management plan – Identify ways to mitigate coastal erosion hazards by increasing sediment supply – Describe actions that may become part of plan but not specific projects This Project: for state and federal agencies This Public Meeting: to gather input at intermediate phase of project

3 Tonights Agenda What is the San Francisco Littoral Cell CRSMP? Physical Setting Finding the Critical Coastal Erosion Areas What Can Be Done? The Path Forward

4 WHAT IS THE SAN FRANCISCO LITTORAL CELL CRSMP?

5 What we are facing regionally… Daly City Pacifica

6 Economics of our local beach zone RegionAttendanceEst. Spending Est. State and Local Tax Revenue Beach Amenities and Use Ease of Access San Francisco 645,000$36,000,000$1,200,000Restrooms, showers, vendors, surfing, aerial sports 7/10 Daly City25,000$1,500,000$45,0004/10 Pacifica253,000$15,300,000$455,000Restrooms, showers, pier, vendors, surfing, 6/10 Phil King, SFSU

7 Consideration of accelerated sea level rise is required 1.5 m USACE 1.4 m 2100 (0.4 m 2050) State 0.5 m USACE

8 The role of sediment (sand and mud) Buffer from ocean processes Habitat (beaches, tidal flats) Creates recreational zone Littoral cell – geographic area offshore that contains a complete cycle of sedimentation including sources, transport paths, and sinks. dunes Typical Littoral Cell river input

9 Existing Sediment Management

10 Regional Sediment Management

11 California Coastal Sediment Master Plan A Super-Regional Approach Pacifica, 1994 Port of Oakland Ocean Beach South Bay Salt Ponds

12 Coastal Regional Sediment Management Plans (CRSMPs) Goals of a CRSMP Restore and Maintain Coastal Beaches and Other Critical Areas of Sediment Deficit Reduce the Proliferation of Protective Shoreline Structures Sustain Recreation and Tourism Enhance Public Safety and Access Restore Coastal Sandy Habitats Legend In-Progress Completed Present Ideas for Local Projects

13 CRSMP Components Physical Processes Ecology Economics & Infrastructure Policy & Governance Geology & Geo- morphology Sediment Budgets, Erosion Transport, Hazards, SLR Special Species, Habitats Roads, Sewers Beach Use, Funding Options Local Coastal Programs, General Plans Comprehensive regional plan with options to address erosion areas

14 Project Basics San Francisco Littoral Cell Habel and Armstrong, 1978 Californias Littoral Cells Primary jurisdictions: – San Francisco – Daly City – Pacifica – National Park Service (GGNRA) – State Parks 16 Reaches

15 Project Schedule Study kick off (summer 2011) Data compilation (spring 2012) Plan formulation happening now Administrative Draft CRSMP (fall 2012) Draft CRSMP (fall 2012) Final CRSMP (winter ) Outreach and Stakeholder Advisory Group (ongoing) Daly City

16 Project Players Federal Interests State Interests CRSMP Lead Outreach & Governance SAG Public

17 Stakeholders Advisory Group USGS, NOAA, NPS, FWS, FEMA, Sanctuary, USACE SLC, CCC, CGS, SCC/OPC, BCDC, DFG, Caltrans, State Parks, Water Board San Francisco Parks and Rec, San Mateo County Parks, San Mateo Harbor District SFSU, SIO, PRBO, Audubon, Surfrider, Pacifica Land Trust, Parks Conservancy, Sierra Club, Pedro Point Surf Club San Francisco PUC SPUR Daly City Water/Wastewater Planning Dept. Public Works Pacifica Public Works Sewer Parks and Rec

18 About ESA PWA Founded in 1976 as PWA in San Francisco In response to engineering projects that fought the land and by an emerging environmental advocacy movement Staff of civil engineers, geomorphologists, scientists, hydrologists, and landscape architects Merged with ESA in 2010

19 About ABAG In 1961, Bay Area leaders recognized the need to address common issues from a regional perspective Elected officials formed the Association of Bay Area Governments – Californias first Council of Governments Enhance the quality of life in the San Francisco Bay Area by leading the region in advocacy, collaboration, and excellence in planning, research, and member services. All 9 counties,101 Bay Area cities

20 PHYSICAL SETTING Source of Photograph: US Army Corps of Engineers, South Pacific Division

21 The San Francisco Littoral Cell Source of Aerial photo: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Scientific Visualization Studio.

22 Golden Gate Sub-cell Battalio and Trivedi, 1996

23 Pacifica Sub-cell Less studied Questions remain: Sediment transport near Pt San Pedro ? Quantified wave climate ? Sediment grain size and underlying geology ? Beach thickness ? Future Management ? Photographs © Bob Battalio, 2012

24 Old dune sand (from the bluff tops) contrasted with the beach sands in the Manor area. Photographs © Bob Battalio, 2012 Coarse dark sand apparently akin to Mori Point and onshore + north transport by large height, long-period west swells winter Manor, January 2010, during a strong bluff erosion episode that threatened multiple apartment complexes. Sharp Park, January, Massive sand accretion overtopped seawall and blocked storm drain outfalls, and nearly overtopped levee at Laguna Salada.

25 Photographs © Bob Battalio, 2012 Rock reef, vicinity of Beach Boulevard

26 Shoreface Morphology Derived from Bascom, W., Waves and Beaches, The Dynamics of the Ocean Surface, Anchor Books Edition, 1980.

27 FINDING THE CRITICAL EROSION AREAS Photographs © Bob Battalio, 2012

28 Formula for an erosion area Shoreline erosion rate Sea level rise Landslide risk Coastal hazard zone Critical infrastructure (roads, pipes, armor, etc) Sensitive habitats CRITICAL EROSION AREA

29 Study Reaches San Francisco – 7 Pacifica – 7 Daly City – 2 GGNRA and State Parks in most reaches

30 Erosion & SLR USACE (2011) Year Low (Historic Trend) Intermediate (NRC Curve I) High (NRC Curve III) Sea Level Rise Estimates (m) 1 – No vertical land motion is included in estimates 2 – Using a historic SLR trend of 2.01 mm/year (as measured at the San Francisco NOAA tide gauge) 1 – most shoreline reaches eroding 2 – large variation

31 Coastal hazard zones

32 Infrastructure at risk Pumping Stations Stormwater Conveyances Roads Coastal Trails Utilities Landfill (Daly City) Shoreline Protection Property

33 The 10 Critical Erosion Areas SF – 3 (7,100) + DC – 3 (7,700) + Pacifica – 4 (12,900) = 5.25 miles

34 How the Critical Erosion Areas Look Sharp Park Daly City Linda Mar Daly City Landfill Ocean Beach

35 WHAT CAN BE DONE? Photographs © Bob Battalio, 2012

36 Initial Options for Critical Coastal Erosion Areas No Action Beach Nourishment Multi-purpose Reefs Managed Retreat – Armor – Allow Natural Processes

37 Beach Nourishment Placement of sediment-water slurry directly on beach or beach face Key questions: – Sediment characteristics and sources – Longevity Carlsbad, CA OpportunitiesConstraints Use sediment trapped on land or from dredging projects Use offshore sediment Rebuild dune habitat Transportation of sediment to receiver sites Immediate, short-term biological impacts Habitat conversion long-term Finkl, Benedet and Campbell, 2006

38 Multi-purpose Reefs OpportunitiesConstraints Create new habitat Enhance surf opportunities Increase sediment retention High energy coastline Limited experience High cost (economic and environmental)

39 Artificial Reef – Plan and Section A New Reef Structure Wave Crests (Typ.) Beach (Pre-reef) Beach (Post-reef) Dune/Bluff Toe Section A

40 Managed Retreat OpportunitiesConstraints Restoration of natural shoreline cycles and habitats Utilize geology (go-n-slow) Removal/reduction of development in risk zones Prior investments in armoring Expense Political will Property rights Existing armoring Pacifica State Beach Managed Retreat and Estuary Restoration Photographs © Bob Battalio, 2012

41 Some activities at Ocean Beach SF and NPS – Sand trucking from NOB to SOB – 100,000 cubic yards in August 2012 ACE – Single placement of 300,000 cubic yards Dredged sediment pumped onshore at Sloat and to 4000 south – Designation of OBDS as permanent site OBMP – 2 million cubic yards of sand placed every 10 years

42 Examples of Options for a Local Plan Beach nourishment Artificial reefs Images from OBMP, AECOM/ESA PWA

43 Baker, China, Pt. Lobos: No Action NOB: Sand Back-passing to SOB MOB: 1.5 million yd 3 Beach Nourishment SOB: Opt 1 – 0.5 million yd 3 Beach Nourishment + Managed Retreat Opt 2 – 0.5 million yd 3 Beach Nourishment + Reefs Ft. Funston: No Action (other plans underway) SF Reaches Options

44 Daly City: Multi-purpose reefs, beach nourishment as bluff protection Mussel Rock: Special Case - recontour landfill, offshore reefs DC Reaches Options

45 Manor District, Beach Blvd: Opt 1 – 2.2 million yd 3 Beach Nourishment Opt 2 – Beach Nourishment + Reefs Opt 3 – Managed Retreat Sharp Park: Opt 1 – Managed Retreat: Allowed Erosion of Levee Opt 2 – 0.6 million yd 3 Beach Nourishment Opt 3 – Multi-purpose Reef Hidden Cove: No Action Rockaway Cove: Opt 1 – 0.25 million yd 3 Beach Nourishment Opt 2 – Managed Retreat Linda Mar: Opt 1 – 0.7 million yd 3 Beach Nourishment Opt 2 – Managed Retreat Opt 3 – Managed Retreat + cobble on beach Shelter Cove: No Action Pacifica Reaches Options

46 THE PATH FORWARD? Photographs © Bob Battalio, 2012

47 Recap: Problem Process Solution HazardsCritical Erosion AreasProposed Ideas South Ocean Beach Beach Blvd Beach Nourishment Managed Retreat Beach Nourishment Nourishment and reefs Managed Retreat

48 Constraints Sediment sources for beach nourishment actions Policy and governance structure Sensitive species

49 Seal Rock, Pt. Lobos, ~1940 Using past ecology for future opportunities

50 The analysis doesnt include every habitat type and every species Vegetation – Sensitive Communities – Wetlands – Rare Plants – Kelp Beds Fish (Salmonids), Amphibians, & Reptiles Birds Marine Mammals Ecological Analysis

51 Other planning in the study area GFNMSGGNRACoastal Cities Revision of exclusion area General Management Plan Update Daly City: GP/LCP Update (2012) Pacifica: GP/LCP Update (2013)

52 Project Schedule (redux) Study kick off (summer 2011) Data compilation (spring 2012) Plan formulation happening now Administrative Draft CRSMP (fall 2012) Draft CRSMP (fall 2012) Final CRSMP (winter ) Outreach and Stakeholder Advisory Group (ongoing)

53 Summary This Project: develop a coastal regional sediment management plan – Identify ways to mitigate coastal erosion hazards by increasing sediment supply – Describe actions that may become part of plan but not specific projects This Project: for state and federal agencies This Public Meeting: to gather input at intermediate phase of project

54 What do YOU think?? Deadline of August 20 for public feedback Contact information for: – ABAG Outreach Manager, Athena Honore Clay St, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA – ESA PWA Project Manager, Doug George 550 Kearny St, Suite 900, San Francisco, CA For more information visit the CSMW website:

55 What we think about the rest of the time…. Thanks!


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