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San Francisco LTMS : Accomplisments And New Challenges SFBJV, March 29, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "San Francisco LTMS : Accomplisments And New Challenges SFBJV, March 29, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 San Francisco LTMS : Accomplisments And New Challenges SFBJV, March 29, 2011

2 Five Key Challenges Facing the Estuary: – Decline of biological resources (especially wetlands and related habitats) – Increased pollution – Freshwater diversions and altered flow regime – Intensified land use and population – Dredging and waterway modification The San Francisco Bay LTMS – Implementing arm of the CCMP for Dredging and Waterway Modification Five Key Challenges Facing the Estuary: – Decline of biological resources (especially wetlands and related habitats) – Increased pollution – Freshwater diversions and altered flow regime – Intensified land use and population – Dredging and waterway modification The San Francisco Bay LTMS – Implementing arm of the CCMP for Dredging and Waterway Modification Origin of the LTMS The San Francisco Estuary Project’s CCMP

3 Maintain…those channels necessary for navigation…and eliminate unnecessary dredging Conduct dredged material disposal in the most environmentally sound manner Maximize use of dredged material as a resource Establish a cooperative permitting framework Maintain…those channels necessary for navigation…and eliminate unnecessary dredging Conduct dredged material disposal in the most environmentally sound manner Maximize use of dredged material as a resource Establish a cooperative permitting framework The LTMS Goals

4 Percent of all Disposal Minimize In-Bay Disposal Maximize Beneficial Reuse Minimize In-Bay Disposal Maximize Beneficial Reuse Plan The LTMS Plan

5 Long-term Goal Initial: LTMS annual limit less than 1/2 previous limits 1/1/10: Annual limit reduced by another 1,135,500 cy Step 2: 12-Year Transition Period Systematically Reduces In-Bay Disposal In-Bay Disposal Step 2: 12-Year Transition Period Systematically Reduces In-Bay Disposal In-Bay Disposal How To Get There

6 In-Bay Disposal In-Bay Disposal – Significantly reduced: disposal limits have been met every year – Mostly done successfully within Environmental Work Windows Ocean Disposal Ocean Disposal – Successful low-impact alternative – Over 15 million cy diverted from in-Bay disposal to date Beneficial Reuse Beneficial Reuse – ~20 million cy has already been reused – Current and near-term capacity for many millions cy more Beach Nourishment Beach Nourishment – ~1 million cy sand placed nearshore for Ocean Beach demo project – EPA/USACE preparing to designated official reuse site “SF-17” In-Bay Disposal In-Bay Disposal – Significantly reduced: disposal limits have been met every year – Mostly done successfully within Environmental Work Windows Ocean Disposal Ocean Disposal – Successful low-impact alternative – Over 15 million cy diverted from in-Bay disposal to date Beneficial Reuse Beneficial Reuse – ~20 million cy has already been reused – Current and near-term capacity for many millions cy more Beach Nourishment Beach Nourishment – ~1 million cy sand placed nearshore for Ocean Beach demo project – EPA/USACE preparing to designated official reuse site “SF-17” The LTMS Transition is On Track How Are We Doing?

7 Montezuma Wetlands Project Hamilton Army Airfield/BMK Sonoma Baylands & Carneros River Ranch Major Bay Area Beneficial Reuse Sites SF-8/Ocean Beach Nourishment Site Middle Harbor Habitat Area Bair Island Cullinan Ranch S. Bay Salt Ponds?

8 Short Term: Short Term: – Escalating costs for: Ocean disposal Hydraulic offloading at reuse sites – Flat or decreasing dredging budgets Long Term: Long Term: – Sediment deficit (habitat erosion, Bay water quality) – Climate change – especially sea level rise – will accelerate habitat loss and other changes Short Term: Short Term: – Escalating costs for: Ocean disposal Hydraulic offloading at reuse sites – Flat or decreasing dredging budgets Long Term: Long Term: – Sediment deficit (habitat erosion, Bay water quality) – Climate change – especially sea level rise – will accelerate habitat loss and other changes But Today We Face New Challenges that the LTMS Plan Did Not Foresee:

9 The New World: Sediment Deficit Changed Situation Point San Pablo, mid-depth, Dave Schoellhamer, USGS

10 Oakland Museum Creek Guide Sediment Supply Shift: from the Delta to local tributaries Changed Situation

11 Area subject to high tide with 16 inches of sea level rise 55 inches of sea level rise and Current 100-year flood plain Changed Situation The New World: Sea Level Rise

12 Shorelines, Marshes and Beaches need sediment to keep up with sea level rise PWA & PRBO in review

13 Sand mining removing sand Patrick Barnard & Rikk Kvitek Sand appears slow to replenish

14 Ocean Disposal Removes Sediment from the System

15 Is the LTMS Approach to Sediment Management too Narrow? Minimizes in-Bay disposal Emphasizes large-scale tidal wetland projects Ocean disposal for remaining dredged material Or Does It Need to be Re-Framed?

16 How can LTMS help in this New World? RSM planning: coordinate sediment sources and needs beyond navigation dredging? – Sand miners – Flood control districts – Watershed management Less reliance on mega-projects? New kinds of Beneficial Reuse, including in-Bay? New policies/laws to facilitate reuse? Your Ideas?

17 LTMSRSM While still working under the LTMS Management Plan for dredging: – Funding local tributaries study – Funding sediment modeling (“UnTRIM” combined with “Sedmorph” and “SWAN”) – State of the Sediment Workshop 2010 – Spring 2011 RSM Stakeholders Workshop – Stakeholder listening sessions – Work toward 2010 program review

18 Contact Information Brian Ross (EPA): – Brenda Goeden (BCDC): – Al Paniccia (USACE): – Beth Christian (Water Board) –

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