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SPORT MANAGEMENT ACCREDITATION

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1 SPORT MANAGEMENT ACCREDITATION
COSMA ACCREDITATION PROCESS TRAINING In today's training session, we will review the basic steps of the accreditation process, the eight principles of accreditation that comprise the self-study, and the site visit process. And, most importantly, we will discuss any questions you have about your specific programs. In all of the training sessions I do, I highly encourage you to ask any and all questions.

2 Philosophy of the COSMA Accreditation Model
Outcomes based/Mission driven Accreditation principles based on best practices in SM education Developmental – annual reporting focused on continuous improvement Flexible – accommodates various institutional models and innovative approaches The philosophy behind the COSMA accreditation model, as many of you know, is a focus on outcomes, not inputs. And it is based on principles, not standards. Standards can be relatively arbitrary or provide an arbitrary cut-off point, while principles measures outcomes and learning processes. Another way to put this is that COSMA accreditation is mission-driven – your specific institutional and program-level mission will impact the interpretation of the COSMA principles. The principles themselves are based on best practices in sport management education. The process is a developmental one – each year, members who have achieved candidacy status or who are accredited are required to submit an annual report. I have seen huge changes in programs from the beginning of this process to when they are being reviewed by the Board of Commissioners to beyond becoming accredited. The process catalyzes changes for the better for these programs – and I have seen so much positive development in what these programs are doing and how they are doing it. I often recommend that prospective members talk to programs who are accredited to get a sense of what they have been through and what was most worthwhile about the process. If you are interested in this, let me know by . Last, without arbitrary standards, the COSMA principles allow a variety of programs to go through the process: small, large, new, established, housed in any college, traditionally run or all online or a hybrid, etc.

3 Benefits of Accreditation
Dedicated staff Free training, assistance Best practices - templates, rubrics External accountability Enhanced reputation External assurance of quality Effective mechanism for continuous improvement Mechanism for program advocacy The benefits of accreditation are many: First, you have access to me – a dedicated staff person. You can attend free training, such as this one, and have accreditation assistance whenever you need it. Just send me an or call me. We collect information on best practices and provide some templates to guide you and other examples such as sample rubrics. COSMA accreditation provides your program with a mechanism for external accountability – something beyond your individual college or university setting. Accredited programs enjoy an enhanced reputation and when students and their parents ask me – is such and such a program accredited? I tell them yes or no and what accreditation means and what questions they can or should ask during interviews with prospective programs. External assurance of quality – the process of COSMA accreditation will push you to have the best program you can. As I mentioned before, the annual report process and the accreditation process itself acts as an effective mechanism for continuous improvement And, very importantly, this process can be a mechanism for program advocacy. For example, and I’ve seen this happen a few times, faculty might carry heavy teaching loads that puts a strain on the quality of the program or does not allow for much innovation and change in the program. These points are picked up by the site review team and the Board of Commissioners and the program is asked to find ways to lighten faculty load. This “note” by the Commissioners can result in the hiring of additional faculty or the reallocation of resources to the SM program.

4 Scope of Accreditation
Includes both undergrad and graduate programs Academic unit should be an identifiable entity and led by a doctorally- or professionally-qualified educator Includes off-campus locations All programs included even if through cooperative or interdisciplinary arrangements All modes of delivery should be included (online, distance learning, adult degree, accelerated) In Annual report, notify COSMA if add new program What programs are included in COSMA accreditation? both undergraduate and graduate programs the program must be an identifiable unit led by a doctorally or professionally qualified educator this includes all off-campus locations all programs, even those that are through interdisciplinary arrangements all modes of delivery must be included And when you develop a new program, let COSMA know and we will incorporate it into the accreditation renewal process

5 Scope of Accreditation
Definition of “Program” – track, minor, concentration Within sport management degree, include all tracks “Tracks” outside sport management degree (e.g., physical education), include sport management track Provide rationale for what you include and what you do not include in accreditation process If a program may “appear” to be accredited by COSMA, either include it in accreditation process or provide rationale for why it’s not included “Programs” include tracks, minors, concentrations Include all tracks within a SM degree and SM tracks outside of the SM degree However, if you have good reason not to include a track or minor, etc., you have the chance to provide a rationale to the Board of Commissioners to have it left out. If a program “appears” to be accredited by COSMA – meaning that it is listed on the same web page that your other programs are listed or it overlaps significantly in coursework – it either must be included in the process or a rationale must be provided as to why it is not included.

6 Steps to Accreditation
Membership application & fee Attain Candidacy Status (CS) Collect data and begin writing Self Study Establish timeline for site visit Complete Self Study (at least 90 days prior to site visit) Site visit (2 days) Decision by Board of Commissioners (November/May-June of each year) The accreditation process is comprised of these steps: First, Membership. This includes submitting basic information about your program and the annual membership fee of $1,800. I prorate this fee, depending on when you join. Second, Candidacy Status – I will go into more detail into this step very soon. Third – writing the self study Fourth – Establishing the timeline for the site visit – the self study must be submitted at least 90 days prior to the site visit. And, the site visit must occur at least 90 days prior to one of the two face-to-face meetings of the Board of commissioners. So, if the Board is meeting in late May, your site visit needs to occur no later than late February, and you must submit your self study no later than late November of the previous year. Fifth – the site visit which is usually led by two reviewers and lasts two days. Last, an accreditation decision by the Board of Commissioners (either in November or May/June of each year). 6

7 Experience with Other Accrediting Bodies?
QUIZ #1 Experience with Other Accrediting Bodies? I am interested in which other accrediting bodies you have had experience with. Going through these other processes can help you with the COSMA accreditation process.

8 Annual Membership Dues
$1,800/year for institutions - covers all degree programs $30/year for individuals – may serve as commissioners and site reviewers Annual membership fees for institutions are $1,800 and the fiscal year runs from July 1 – June 30. As I said, I will prorate that fee on a quarterly basis. The annual membership fee for individuals is $30 per year and those members may act as site reviewers or be on the Board of Commissioners or Board of Directors and vote at the Annual Membership Meetings.

9 Cost of a Site Visit Estimated total cost for two site reviewers - $3,500 Fixed costs: Application fee: $1,200 Honorarium: $1,000 Variable costs: Travel: $800 Food & Lodging: $500 The only other fees associated with COSMA accreditation are for the site visit. Fixed costs include the $1,200 administrative fee and the $1,000 honoraria for the two site reviewers – this is the total honorarium. The variable costs are estimated here but include travel, lodging, and food. So, the total can be less than what is estimated, depending on these variable costs. 9

10 Step One: Membership Apply online (www.cosmaweb.org/howtojoin) or download the form to mail in Pay dues of $1,800 for institutional membership (prorated, depending on when you start your membership) or $30 for individual membership Show proof of regional accreditation (U.S. institutions) or entity that authorizes degree granting (non-U.S. institutions) Need signature of CEO To become a member of COSMA, you fill out and submit a membership form and pay the fee. Part of this form is to show proof of your institution’s regional accreditation and you also need the signature from your CEO that they acknowledge and support going through the process. 10

11 Step Two: Candidacy Status
Purpose: To provide your academic unit/sport management program an opportunity to prepare itself for the development of a Self Study and have a site visit Build overall confidence and understanding in the accreditation process Normally will not exceed five years Submit: Program overview, outcomes assessment plan (use template), links to industry, letter of support from administration, catalog, organizational chart The purpose of CS is to give you time to develop your self-study and prepare for a site visit from a team appointed by COSMA. The candidacy process is designed to help you gain a deeper understanding of the accreditation process and save you time and effort in preparing the self-study. The bulk of information submitted in this process is the outcomes assessment plan. CS normally does not extend beyond 5 years. 11

12 Step Three: Self Study/Documentation of Accreditation Principles
Outcomes Assessment Strategic Planning Curriculum Faculty Scholarly & Professional Activities Resources Internal & External Relationships Educational Innovation These are the eight COSMA principles that I will be discussing today.

13 Principle 1: Outcomes Assessment
Five areas of assessment: Mission and broad based goals Student learning outcomes Basic skills development Student personal development Operational outcomes measures There are five areas that you will be assessing in your Outcomes Assessment. I will review student learning outcomes last since I will go into great detail on that area.

14 Outcomes Assessment: Documentation in the Self Study
Documentation for the Self Study includes: 1. Copy of O/A plan (updated from CS application) 2. Results of implementation in five assessment areas 3. Summary of changes, improvements needed 4. Summary of action plans to make changes 5. Summary of realized outcomes from action plans 6. Narrative showing integration of O/A results into your strategic plan Your will develop and implement an outcomes assessment process. This includes a plan, identifying any changes and improvements, integration of those changes into the strategic planning process, and documentation of the realized outcomes. It is a program-level assessment, consistent with any institutional plan your college or university has. And while you submitted this previously in your candidacy status application– what you submit here is an updated version. 14

15 Mission and Broad-Based Goals
Understanding the Outcomes Assessment Process - IACBE 2005 Mission and Broad-Based Goals Institution: Provide your institution’s approved mission & broad-based goals Sport Management Program: Provide the approved broad-based goals for your sport management program Measurement: State how you will provide evidence that the goals are being accomplished Reporting the mission and goals asks that you present them for your institution, for your SM department, and how you will provide evidence that the goals are being accomplished.

16 Basic Skills Development
Understanding the Outcomes Assessment Process - IACBE 2005 Basic Skills Development Prepare a statement on the “Basic Skills” development program at your institution Describe how this is administered within the SM department Programs to help students with writing deficiencies Tutoring services Basic Skills Development: This plan should describe the SM program and institution’s methods used to ensure that students are able to operate at a college level in terms of mathematics and writing, along with the methods used to assess this development. You describe how this is administered within your department and any help you provide to students with deficiencies. For example, this may be covered in your institution’s general education requirements or there may be exams that test incoming students’ skill levels and subsequent placement or remediation.

17 Personal Development of Students
Understanding the Outcomes Assessment Process - IACBE 2005 Personal Development of Students Prepare a statement on the “Personal Development” of students at your institution Describe how this is administered within your SM department -- Special programs focused on personal development – interpersonal skills, student leadership -- First year seminar Personal Development: This plan should describe how students’ personal development is administered within your department such as providing a first year seminar, a special program on interpersonal skills, leadership, resume writing, interviewing skills, international experience, etc., along with the methods used to assess this type of development in your students.

18 Operational Measures How you will measure effectiveness of your SM program and accomplish goals and objectives outlined in strategic plan: Graduation rates and internship placement Teaching evaluations Advisory Board meetings and action plans Retention rates Alumni/Graduate exit surveys SWOT analysis Faculty scholarship University-based assessments (okay for program level) For this section, you will show how you measure the effectiveness of your program and how you are accomplishing the goals and objectives outlined in your strategic plan. I am showing you some examples of ways in which you can collect this data. It is okay to use any university-based assessments of your program – please do not reinvent the wheel if you don’t have to! Most critically, this section is tied together with your overall strategic plan, so we’ll come back to this.

19 Student Learning Outcomes
Understanding the Outcomes Assessment Process - IACBE 2005 Student Learning Outcomes What is a learning outcome? Description of what your students are able to do Clear and measurable Related to the goals of the institution Identify measurement tools you will use/rubric design (2 direct and 2 indirect measures) Institutional Goals Program Learning Outcome Communicate effectively both orally and in writing. Comprehension and application of professional written and oral communication business skills. Student learning outcomes are clear and measurable and show what your students are able to do and what they know. They are related to the goals of your institution, as seen in the matrix. It is for these outcomes that you identify the two direct and two indirect measurement tools and/or rubrics you will use. In the example, you can see that the institutional goal is a broad goal about written and oral communication and the program-level goal or learning outcome is more specific to the program.

20 Tips for Writing Student Learning Outcomes
Creating student learning outcomes is a process. Some programs have found the following steps to be helpful: Step 1: Faculty/staff brainstorm meeting … and/or … Consult other SM program websites. Step 2: Agree on a first draft list of outcomes. Step 3: List the student learning outcomes on every syllabus for the required courses in your degree program. Step 4: Gather feedback from students. Step 5: Design assignments geared to measure achievement of each of the outcomes for each degree program. Step 6: Using the collected data, revise the list of outcomes, teaching methods, curricula, and/or program. Step 7: Repeat the above steps regularly and as needed to improve student learning. Creating student learning outcomes for your degree program is a process. Some programs have found the following steps to be helpful: Step 1 Start by having a faculty/staff meeting (including students and community members, ideally) and brainstorm about what an ideal graduate would know, understand, and be able to do…and/or Consult the websites for other SM programs – many of them are developing student learning outcomes for degree programs at various levels. Step 2 Agree on a first draft of a list of outcomes, understanding that they will be revised several times before becoming definitive and that they will change over time for currency in the discipline and the changing needs and characteristics of your students. Step 3 List the student learning outcomes on every syllabus for the required courses in your degree program, indicating which of them will be covered in each particular course. Step 4 Gather feedback from students in each course about how well they perceive that student learning outcomes were addressed. Step 5 Assess student learning by designing assignments specifically geared to measure achievement of each of the outcomes that are designated for the degree programs. These are your direct and indirect measurements of student learning, which I will review next. Step 6 In light of this data, meet with faculty, staff, and students at the end of each semester or academic year and revise the list of outcomes, teaching methods, curriculum, and/or program. Step 7 Repeat the above steps regularly and as needed to improve student learning.

21 Measuring Student Learning Outcomes: Bloom’s Taxonomy
When you write student learning outcomes, you should use verbs that show the appropriate level at which your student are learning and are demonstrating what they know. These verbs will be different depending on the level of the program that your students are at: the level of learning at the undergraduate level will be different from the master’s and the doctoral level.

22 Measuring Student Learning Outcomes
Identify a minimum of: two direct measures two indirect measures Explain the process for how your measures will provide meaningful results Provide copies of your instruments/rubrics in the appendix In the self-study, you must identify a minimum of two direct and two indirect measures of student learning – you can provide more. You must demonstrate how your measures will provide meaningful results. Place the instruments and rubrics in the appendix of the self-study (Volume II).

23 QUIZ #2 Direct Measures of Student Learning
Which of the following is a Direct measure of student learning? a)  Internship reflection paper b)  Internship supervisor evaluation c)  e-Portfolio assignment in a capstone course d)  Alumni Survey I have a quiz for you! Just a little “pre-test” to see how well you already know your indirect and direct measures of student learning. Which of the following is a Direct measure of student learning? a)  Internship reflection paper b)  Internship supervisor evaluation c)  e-Portfolio assignment in a capstone course d)  Alumni Survey

24 Understanding the Outcomes Assessment Process - IACBE 2005
Direct Measures Demonstrate direct evidence of student learning: Comprehensive exams Standardized national exams Pretest and posttest assessments Required structured internship Portfolios (electronic or traditional) Capstone project assessment Thesis/Dissertation External certification program (e.g., NSSE) Direct measures of student learning demonstrate direct evidence of student learning through some of the examples shown. Comprehensive exams Standardized exams – ETS – other discipline specific examples Pre/Post-testing – have initial exam/assessment in first year of program and final exam/assessment in capstone or final required course in last year of program Portfolios – compilation of student work demonstrating learning in specific areas. Can focus on entire program, business core, major. Can be “electronic.” Required structured internships Capstone project

25 Indirect Measures of Student Learning
Asks students about their learning: Graduate survey Alumni survey Employer survey Exit interview Advisory Boards Student focus groups Anecdotal evidence An indirect measure asks a student about his or her learning. As the examples show, none of them directly assess what a student knows, but asks for them or someone else who knows them to report what they know.

26 Understanding the Outcomes Assessment Process - IACBE 2005
Institutional Goals Program Learning Outcome Benchmark Measurement Tool Communicate effectively both orally and written. Comprehension and application of professional written and oral communication skills. 80% of the students will meet defined proficiency standards in writing skills using the writing rubric 80% of the students will meet defined proficiency standards in presentation skills using the presentation rubric Written assignments in BU450 evaluated with Rubric Presentations in BUS 311 evaluated with Rubric So now we go back to the matrix. You see in the third column that a benchmark is set stating that 80% of students will meet the proficiency standards in the rubric for both written and oral communication skills. In the fourth column, you see specific class assignments that will measure these skills. These assignments are direct measures of student learning and as long as the assignments are required, they are acceptable to use.

27 What are Action Plans? Make informed decisions regarding curriculum and program Action plans should be related to assessment results Action plans should be driven by the faculty (curriculum committees); maintain meeting minutes, etc. Create a culture of assessment and continuous improvement Action plans are what you are going to do as a result of the data that you collected about student learning outcomes. They help you make informed decisions about ways to modify your program based on data. Ideally, action plans are driven by data and faculty and reinforce the COSMA accreditation process that helps cultivate a culture of assessment and continuous improvement.

28 Final Step – Action Plans
Understanding the Outcomes Assessment Process - IACBE 2005 Final Step – Action Plans Institutional Goals Student Learning Outcomes Benchmark Measurement Tool Results Action Plan Communicate effectively both orally and written. Comprehension and application of professional written and oral communication business skills. 80% of the students meet proficiency standards in writing - measured using writing rubric Written assignments in BU210 and BU404 85.6% of the student in BU210 & BU404 met the standard Continue to record scores for writing evaluation the these two courses. Discuss the possibility of a standardized test in the core courses to meet this competency This matrix adds to the ones previous and shows the entire process: from institution and program-level goals to the benchmarks used and measurement tools used. The results show how many students achieved the standard outlined in the benchmark and what you plan to do as a result. In this case, the written evaluation scores will continue to be recorded and discussion about a standardized test in this area will occur as part of the action plan.

29 O/A: Common Challenges
Direct measures – linking measures to specific outcomes Rubric development & data collection -- Go beyond using course grades Distinguishing between direct and indirect measures: e.g., teaching evaluations, internship reflections, internship supervisor evaluations 1. The area that is most difficult for many programs is linking the measurement tools to specific student learning outcomes. As in the previous slide with the matrix, the key is to show how the assignment or exam or portfolio directly relates to the desired outcome of acquiring knowledge or a skill. A matrix similar to the one I showed you is part of the outcomes assessment template that you must use when submitting your candidacy status application. 2. Look to resources within your institution or on the web to develop appropriate rubrics for your measurement tools. Go beyond course grades in terms of evaluating the content of student work and to better describe what level they are meeting the benchmark you set. 3. Teaching evaluations cannot be used as a direct measure of student learning. At most they can be used to measure operational effectiveness and possibly as an indirect measure of student learning, depending on what they ask. The same goes for reflection papers (usually indirect measures) and supervisor evaluations (depending on what they ask).

30 Useful Resources for Rubric Development
rics.htm assessment/ksom/ These are a couple of URLs that can help you develop rubrics – I put the links on the COSMA website under Resources & Manuals/Measurement Tools & Rubrics.

31 Principle 2: Strategic Planning
Profile of sport management program Description, assessment of resources External analysis – beyond COSMA site visit SWOT analysis Student learning objectives, strategies, actions plans, and O/A processes Operational objectives, strategies, action plans, and O/A processes This takes us to Strategic Planning – the second principle. The site visit team will want to review your strategic plan's results and examine how the results are being used to develop and improve your program(s). Ideally, the strategic plan will include the O/A plan, and if not, they should be integrated and consistent with each other. It is suggested that the plan include these six elements: a profile of your SM program, a description and assessment of its resources, an external analysis (beyond the COSMA site visit), a SWOT analysis, student learning objectives, strategies, action plans, and processes, and operational objectives, strategies, action plans, and processes. These last two items can come directly from your outcomes assessment.

32 Principle 3: Curriculum
3.1 Program Design 3.2 Common Professional Component 3.3 General Education 3.4 Breadth and Depth of Curriculum 3.5 Curriculum Review and Improvement 3.6 Master’s Degree Curriculum 3.7 Doctoral Curriculum Principle three is composed of seven parts and we will discuss each one in depth.

33 3.1: Program Design Self Study Guidelines:
List each academic degree and number conferred Provide enrollment information: a) institution total b) SM program(s) total c) each degree’s total Describe contact hours required to earn one unit of academic credit Length of time to each bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral degree As an outcomes-based accrediting body, COSMA takes a flexible approach to program design and recognizes the rapidly-changing world of sport management education, in which programs are designed for delivery through multiple formats, including face-to-face, online, and blended methods. For this principle, you are asked to: List each academic degree (including each major, concentration, or emphasis) offered through or administered by your department, and provide the number of degrees conferred during the self-study year and the previous two academic years. If you use different delivery methods, you would show this information for each delivery method used. Next you provide enrollment information including: (a) total enrollment of the institution, (b) total enrollment in sport management programs, and (c) total enrollment in each degree (including each major or concentration) that you offer. Again, if different delivery methods are used, please show this information separately. Describe the contact hours required to earn one unit of academic credit for each sport management program. Describe how many years, semesters, or quarters of full-time academic work are required to earn a bachelor’s degree. Describe how many years, semesters, or quarters of full-time academic work are required to earn a master’s degree. Describe how many years, semesters, or quarters of full-time academic work are required to earn a doctoral degree, including the dissertation.

34 3.2 Common Professional Component
QUIZ #3 3.2 Common Professional Component What is the normal range for the number of contact hours for each CPC area? a)  15-30 b)  c)  40-90 d)  60-70 Before we talk about Principle 3.2 the Common Professional Component. What is the normal range of hours for each CPC area? The answer is B – The purpose of this table is to ensure that the CPC topic areas are covered in undergraduate sport management degree programs. COSMA does not expect that all of the CPC areas will be covered equally. It is your responsibility to provide an appropriate rationale for any significant CPC variations. You need to identify where the topical areas in the CPC are covered in your required course offerings. This requires that you first complete an Abbreviated Course Syllabus for each required course (an example of that is provided in the Appendix of the Principles document). The Abbreviated Course Syllabus should include a course outline specifying the CPC coverage in that course. Because a course may simultaneously cover multiple topics (for example, consumer behavior covered in a marketing course may also count towards psychological foundations), it is normal for the total hours of CPC coverage in a course to exceed the actual number of scheduled student contact hours. The normal range for the contact hour totals for an individual course is in a semester program, although some integrative courses may be higher. The normal range for the contact hour totals for a CPC area is from approximately 20 to over 100 in a semester program. In both of these cases, the assumption involves three-hour courses with 45 class contact hours during a semester.

35 3.2: Common Professional Component (CPC)
E) Finance/Accounting/ Economics 1. Sport finance 2. Accounting 3. Economics of sport F) Legal aspects of sport G) Integrative experience: 1. Strategic mgmt/policy 2. Internship 3. Capstone experience A) Social, psychological and international foundations of sport B) Management 1. Sport mgmt principles 2. Sport leadership 3. Operations mgmt/event & venue mgmt 4. Sport governance C) Ethics D) Sport marketing & communications On this slide, you can see the topic areas that are considered to be the key content areas in the sport management field. 35

36 CPC Self Study Guidelines
A course may simultaneously cover multiple topics Does not apply to Master's/Doctoral programs Prepare abbreviated syllabi for each required course Prepare CPC Table (1) Provide rationale for deviations Use sample tables and course syllabi Undergraduate Programs: The Common Professional Component (CPC) is comprised of your undergraduate sport management core, which represents the required sport management courses in an undergraduate major, concentration, or degree program. The CPC consists of topical areas in sport management as listed on the previous slide. You need to identify where the topical areas in the CPC are covered in your required course offerings. This requires that you first complete an Abbreviated Course Syllabus for each course. In the self study, provide the following information: An Abbreviated Course Syllabus for each required course in your undergraduate sport management core (these should be placed in the Appendix) A separate CPC table (Table 1) for each undergraduate degree program, major, or concentration that contains a different sport management core. This includes any interdisciplinary and specialized degree programs with substantial sport management content for which you are seeking COSMA accreditation. If you are seeking COSMA accreditation for any interdisciplinary or specialized degree programs that do not cover all of the CPC topical areas, provide a rationale for this variation in CPC coverage. To obtain full CPC credit for “required courses” in majors or concentrations over and above your undergraduate sport management core, develop a separate CPC table for each major or concentration. Note: If you have a required course in your undergraduate sport management core that is taught by an academic department outside of your sport management program, prepare a syllabus and include it and the contact hours with this section of the self study. Master’s Degree and Doctoral Programs: The CPC requirement does not apply to master’s degree and doctoral programs.

37 CPC Table A sample table summarizing contact hours for all required courses in an undergraduate sport management core is shown here, along with a summary of CPC topical areas covered in each course. This information comes directly from the Recap section in a syllabus. This matrix is an excellent way to review the academic content of your degree program and can help reveal its strengths and weaknesses. A lower number than the average can tell you something useful.

38 3.3: General Education Self Study Guidelines:
Complete Table 2: Undergraduate Curriculum Composition Include description of each SM program (from catalog) Does not apply to master’s, doctoral degrees In bachelor’s degree programs, general education requirements consist primarily of liberal arts and related courses. Courses offered within the sport management program such as information technology as an example, also may be appropriately included in the category of general education. Please have on file and make available for site visit evaluators curriculum sheets, degree plans, degree audit forms, or other documents to reflect that the general education requirement is being fulfilled for graduation. In the self-study: Complete Table 2 Identify the catalog page numbers that contain the description of each sport management program. Note: International institutions without U.S.-based regional accreditation should contact the COSMA headquarters for additional information concerning responding to this principle. Master’s Degree and Doctoral Programs: This principle does not apply to master’s degree and doctoral programs.

39 Here is a sample of what Table 2 looks like
Here is a sample of what Table 2 looks like. It shows the total number of credit hours required for a sport management degree at the bachelor’s level, subdivided into the total number of student credit hours to meet the institution’s general education requirements and the total hours of sport management course requirements. In this sample, you see that the general education requirements and SM core course requirements are 1/3 of the total number of courses each and the remaining third is split up by general electives and other required courses beyond the core.

40 3.4: Breadth and Depth of Curriculum
Self Study Guidelines: Use Table 2 to show the percentage of SM courses that are required to earn a bachelor’s degree – including the SM core, required courses beyond the core, and elective courses. Provide rationale if any program requires less than 25% SM courses Does not apply to master’s, doctoral programs Undergraduate degree programs should: (1) have content-specific courses taught specifically in sport management, (2) require appropriate prerequisites, and (3) offer students opportunities to demonstrate breadth and depth of knowledge in the area of sport management. For Undergraduate programs, use Table 2 to show the percentage of sport management courses that are required to earn a bachelor’s degree. These courses include the sport management core, the required courses beyond the core, and elective courses. If any degree programs require less than 25 percent sport management courses, provide the rationale. Master’s Degree and Doctoral Programs: This principle does not apply to master’s degree and doctoral programs.

41 3.5: Curriculum Review and Improvement
Self Study Guidelines: Describe process of continuous evaluation of SM courses – include how O/A supports this Document involvement of faculty in review of SM degree programs and curricula Describe how alumni and other outside groups are involved in periodic review of your SM program/curricula Describe extent to which faculty is involved in evaluation of general education program Describe process for changing your curriculum or developing a new degree program The sport management faculty should participate in the continuous review of the curricula and recommend changes and improvements as deemed appropriate. It is essential that assessment of student learning outcomes be used in this review process. In addition, periodic surveys should be conducted of graduates and the employers of interns or graduates, to obtain information with which to assess the success of degree programs in meeting the needs of students and the demands of employers. The results of the review and assessments should be used to identify the changes and improvements that are needed, if any, in the academic programs. In the self-study: Describe your process of continuous evaluation of sport management courses. This description should include an explanation of the ways in which outcomes assessment supports curriculum review and improvement in your sport management program. Document the involvement of your faculty in the periodic review of your degree programs and curricula. Describe how your alumni, the sport management community, and other outside groups are involved in the periodic review of your sport management programs and curriculum. Describe the extent to which the sport management faculty is involved in the evaluation of the institution’s general education program. Describe the process for changing your curriculum or developing a new degree program for your sport management program. If this process is described in your Faculty Handbook, provide the page numbers.

42 3.6: Master’s Degree Curriculum
Self Study Guidelines: List all graduate degrees and curricular requirements Identify which courses are not reserved exclusively for graduate students Describe ways in which you handle coverage of undergraduate CPC topics for non-SM bachelor’s students. The requirement that the graduate courses be beyond the level of the undergraduate CPC courses means that the courses should be graduate level, advanced courses in sport management. For students entering the graduate sport management program who have not completed an undergraduate sport management degree there must be some mechanism in place to prepare the students for graduate-level sport management courses. In the self-study: List all of the graduate degrees that your program administers and provide a copy of the stated curricular requirements for these graduate degrees. Also identify the required number of course credit hours of graduate level work beyond the undergraduate CPC for each of your graduate programs in sport management. Identify which of your graduate level courses are not reserved exclusively for graduate students and provide the rationale for this procedure where applicable. Describe the ways in which you are handling the coverage of the undergraduate CPC topics for non-sport management bachelor’s students entering your graduate sport management program. Note: It is not necessary to prepare a separate CPC coverage table for your graduate courses.

43 3.7: Doctoral Curriculum Self Study Guidelines:
Describe how curricula contribute to professional and scholarly development of your doctoral students. Provide syllabi for all doctoral courses. Provided analysis of curricular requirements for the program. Describe research components in the program. Describe areas of specialization. Provide copy of dissertation manual. Describe how you cover the undergraduate CPC topics for non-SM students entering your program. Degree requirements for the doctoral degree must require scholarly and professional activities designed to advance the student substantially beyond the educational accomplishments of a masters-level degree program. In addition, professional ethics relevant to the purpose of the degree should be emphasized. COSMA expects that the curriculum of accredited doctoral degree programs will be appropriate to the goals of the program and will contribute to the development of doctoral degree students into individuals capable of contributing to the academy. All doctoral courses should be rigorous and challenging. While it is acceptable for doctoral students to take some masters-level courses in a doctoral program, a substantial percentage of the required course work should be in courses reserved for doctoral students. In addition, doctoral education requires a substantial research component, including courses in statistical and research methods and a requirement for a rigorous research project (i.e. a thesis or dissertation). In the self-study: Describe the ways in which the curricula for your doctoral programs contribute to the professional and scholarly development of your doctoral students. Include a description of the ways in which ethical principles are reinforced through the curricula and administrative policies of the program. Provide syllabi for all doctoral courses (these can be placed in the Appendix of your self-study). Provide an analysis of the curricular requirements for the program. This analysis should list each course and indicate whether the course is reserved for doctoral students, and should provide the percentage of courses in the degree program that can only be taken by students enrolled in the doctoral program. Describe the research components in the degree program, and indicate what percentage of the total hours required for the degree program include courses in statistical and research methods and in a rigorous research project such as a thesis or dissertation. Describe any areas of specialization taught within the doctoral program. Provide a copy of your dissertation manual. This manual should describe the dissertation process, including courses required, composition of the dissertation committee, requirements for the dissertation, etc. Describe the ways in which you are handling the coverage of the undergraduate CPC topics for non-sport management bachelor’s students entering your graduate sport management program.

44 Principle 4: Faculty 4.1 Faculty Qualifications 4.2 Faculty Load
4.3 Program Coverage 4.4 Faculty Evaluation 4.5 Faculty Development 4.6 Faculty Policies This Principle is composed of six elements and we will review them all in detail. 44

45 4.1: Faculty Qualifications
Doctorally qualified: Holds Ph.D. in SM or related field Holds J.D. and teaches in legal environment of SM Holds out-of-field doctorate, with sufficient combination of graduate work, professional experience, scholarly achievements, and successful teaching experience Professionally qualified: Be A.B.D. Hold Master’s degree in SM field and five years teaching experience Hold Master’s degree in SM-related field with post-graduate training in areas of teaching responsibility Minimally qualified: 1. Master’s degree in field appropriate to teaching responsibilities I am going to talk about this in two parts. First I will talk about how faculty portfolios are evaluated to determine whether they are doctorally- , professionally-, or minimally-qualified: To be considered doctorally-qualified at the undergraduate level, a faculty member may: Hold an earned doctorate in sport management or a sport management-related field; or Hold a Juris Doctorate and teach in the areas of legal environment of sport management; or Hold an earned “out-of-field” doctorate, along with a sufficient combination of graduate course work in the area of assigned teaching responsibilities, professional experience, scholarly achievements, and extensive and substantial documented successful teaching experience at the college level in the area of assigned teaching responsibilities. To be considered professionally qualified, a faculty member may: 1. Be A.B.D. (has completed all course work required for a doctoral program, passed the general comprehensive examinations, but has not completed a dissertation) with a major, minor, or concentration in the area of assigned teaching responsibilities; or 2. Hold a masters degree in a sport management-related field, and have five or more years of professional and management experience in work directly related to his or her assigned teaching responsibilities, and have extensive and substantial documented successful teaching experience in the area of assigned teaching responsibilities, and demonstrate involvement in meaningful research and/or programs for the enhancement of pedagogical (or andragogical) skills; or 4. Hold a masters degree in a sport management-related field, and have completed a special post-graduate training program especially designed to improve the faculty member’s knowledge and teaching skills in the area of the assigned teaching responsibilities. Minimum Qualifications: The minimum qualification for a faculty member is a master’s degree in a field appropriate to the assigned teaching responsibilities. An institution may make an exception to this minimum requirement only in emergency cases or special situations where the faculty member has unique qualifications to meet that specialized need. We would need to see a written explanation for a situation like this. 45

46 4.1: Faculty Qualifications
Self Study Guidelines: Identify the credentials of all full- and part-time faculty members Provide current vitae for all SM faculty (in Appendix) Prepare and submit Tables 3 and 4 (Table 5, Master’s; Table 6, Doctoral program) Prepare and submit Table 7: Faculty Coverage Summary Full-time and part-time faculty members teaching courses in the sport management program need to be accounted for in responding to this principle. The definition of full-time faculty includes full-time visiting professors, full-time adjunct faculty, and full-time faculty with administrative loads, such as department chairs. Part-time faculty includes adjuncts, administration and staff teaching on an adjunct basis, and full-time faculty from other units teaching part-time in sport management programs. ALL faculty who teach sport management coded courses must be included. In the self-study: Identify the catalog page numbers which describe the academic credentials of each full-time and part-time faculty member. Provide a current vita for all sport management faculty members; these should be placed in the Appendix section of the self study. Prepare and submit the Faculty Qualifications Table (see Table 3). Prepare and submit Tables 4, 5, or 6: Teaching Load and student credit hours generated. Prepare and submit Table 7: Faculty Coverage Summary. I will now review each of the tables that I just mentioned. 46

47 This is a sample that you can follow if you wish, but it is not required.

48 The Faculty Qualifications Table should be presented as shown in Table 3. All faculty who teach sport management-coded courses must be included, with full and part-time faculty members listed separately in alphabetical order. When a faculty member teaches at more than one program level (undergraduate, masters, doctoral), list each program level on a separate line under the heading “Program Level.” In determining whether a faculty member is doctorally, professionally, or minimally qualified, use the definitions I described to you in Principle 4.1.

49 Prepare and submit the Teaching Load and Student Credit Hours Generated Table. Three example versions of this table are included in this manual; one is for institutions with undergraduate sport management courses only (Table 4), one for institutions with master’s degree programs (Table 5), and one for institutions with doctoral programs (Table 6). Submit only one table, using the form appropriate for your situation. In preparing the appropriate table, full and part-time faculty members should be shown alphabetically and grouped separately. The table should account for all student credit hours taught in the sport management program during the self study period—both required and elective sport management courses taught. Determine the qualification level of each faculty member for the courses taught. Totals, by faculty qualification level (doctorally, professionally, and minimally) are shown as well as a total for undergraduate, master’s degree, and doctoral-level student credit hours. If the institution is operating on a quarter system, the table will require a slight modification to include three quarters rather than two semesters. This table should also include the number of sections, course preparations, and disciplines taught by each faculty member.

50 QUIZ #4 Faculty 1) One of your faculty members has an M.B.A. degree and experience teaching sport finance and accounting.  Which are they considered to be? a)  doctorally-qualified b)  professionally-qualified 2) What is the minimum number of faculty I need for my program? This faculty member would be considered professionally-qualified. What is the minimum number of faculty I need for my program? COSMA does not specify the number of faculty needed. Your program will be evaluated on faculty load, program coverage, and resource allocation which will show whether you have “enough” faculty to effectively manage your program.

51 In completing the table, only include columns for the level of programs that your academic unit/sport management program offers. For example, if you offer only undergraduate programs, please delete the columns for masters and doctoral credit hours. The data for this table come directly from the totals in the Faculty Load and Credit Hour Generation Table (Table 4, 5, or 6).

52 4.2: Faculty Load Self Study Guidelines:
State policy for normal teaching load Describe overload and extra pay policies Explain variations in load policies in your SM department Provide policy on teaching loads for part-time, adjunct faculty Indicate where these policies are stated with page numbers Refer to Table 4 (or 5, 6) to explain any deviations between actual teaching loads and load policy List faculty who receive reductions in teaching load or other responsibilities, amount, and reason Explain how faculty is sufficient to manage program operations The philosophy behind this Principle is that excellence in teaching is related to appropriate faculty workloads. If workloads are excessive, it is likely that student learning outcomes, as measured by the outcomes assessment process, will not reach a sufficient level of excellence. In the self study: State the institutional or sport management program policy that determines the normal teaching load of the full-time faculty. Describe how the policies are administered in terms of overloads and extra pay for overloads. Explain any variations between the academic load policies used in your program and other sport management programs. Provide the policy on teaching loads for part-time and/or adjunct faculty. Identify the documents that contain these policies and the page numbers where these policies are stated. Referring to the Teaching Load and Student Credit Hours Generated table (Table 4, 5, or 6), explain any deviations between actual teaching loads and your program’s academic load policy. List all faculty members who receive reductions in teaching load and/or other professional responsibilities, and indicate the amount of the reduction and the reason. Explain how the faculty is sufficient to manage program operations. How are internships and student advising handled? 52

53 4.3: Program Coverage Self Study Guidelines:
Prepare Table 8: Faculty Coverage showing the name of at least one doctorally- or professionally-qualified faculty member who has oversight of each area of the CPC Faculty members should be deployed in a way as to give all students reasonable access to receive instruction from doctorally-qualified and/or professionally qualified full-time faculty. For each area of the CPC, at least one full-time faculty member who is doctorally qualified or professionally qualified should have oversight of the curriculum in that particular area. If an individual faculty member is doctorally-qualified or professionally-qualified in more than one area, it is possible for the faculty member to oversee multiple CPC areas. 53

54 To show this, you will prepare Table 8 that indicates the name of at least one full-time doctorally or professionally qualified faculty member who has oversight of each area of the CPC.

55 4.4: Faculty Evaluation Self Study Guidelines:
Describe faculty evaluation process and how it is used to measure teaching and student learning effectiveness. If described in the Faculty Handbook, provide page number. Provide copies of the instruments used in the evaluation process and evidence that they are being used (place in Appendix). This principle requires institutional justification of human resource decisions based on the mission and broad-based goals of the your program. The process used for faculty evaluations should be within the jurisdiction of your program and include a combination of student, peer, supervisor, and self-evaluation. The results of faculty evaluations should be shared with the individual faculty members being evaluated and a record of these evaluations should be maintained in the faculty member’s personnel file. The evaluation system should provide an opportunity for a faculty member to appeal the evaluation results. In the self study: Describe the faculty evaluation process for your academic unit/sport management program and how it is used to measure teaching and student learning effectiveness. If the process is described in the Faculty Handbook, provide the page numbers for this information. Provide copies of the instruments used in the evaluation process and evidence that these instruments are being used. These instruments should be placed in the Appendix of the self study. 55

56 4.5: Faculty Development Self Study Guidelines:
Describe faculty development program for your institution and SM program. If in the Faculty Handbook, provide page numbers. Demonstrate effectiveness of your faculty development program by providing examples of the results of its implementation. Excellence in sport management education requires faculty to be current in their assigned field(s), to be engaged with the academic and sport management communities, and to continually seek to improve themselves as academic professionals. The institution should encourage and reward appropriate professional development through research grants, sabbaticals, leaves of absence, travel to professional meetings, student assistance, and clerical help for research projects. The institution should have appropriate policies for all aspects of professional development activities. In the self study: Describe the faculty development program for your institution and for your program. If this information is contained in your Faculty Handbook, please provide the page numbers. Demonstrate the effectiveness of your faculty development program by providing examples of the results of its implementation within your program. 56

57 4.6: Faculty Policies Self Study Guidelines:
Provide a copy of the Faculty Handbook (include in Appendix or as separate document). Describe how faculty are made aware of these policies and notified of changes. The faculty policies, procedures, and practices mentioned in the previous principle normally include such items as: Faculty development Tenure and promotion practices Evaluation procedures and criteria Workload policies Service policies Professional principles Scholarly principles Termination and leave policies In the self study: Provide a copy of the faculty handbook, which should include institutional policies and practices for the faculty. If it is too bulky to include in the Appendix of the self study, send it as a separate document with the self study. Describe how faculty are made aware of these policies and are notified of changes. 57

58 Principle 5: Scholarly and Professional Activities
Scholarship of: Teaching Discovery Integration Application Professional activities include: consulting, seminars, workshops, professional organizations We move on to Principle 5. Faculty should be involved in activities that enhance the depth and scope of their knowledge. The amount and type of involvement should be appropriate for the mission of the department and level of programs you offer. There are four types of scholarly activity: Teaching – knowledge of one's field and how that information is conveyed effectively. E.g. Curriculum review and revision Discovery - “basic research” - investigation and research that contributes to the field and is disseminated. E.g., presenting a paper at a professional meeting Integration – Bring new insights on original research and fitting one's work into larger intellectual patterns. E.g, textbook authoring Application – responsible application of knowledge to consequential problems. E.g, consulting A professional activity is defined as providing professionally-related services to individuals or organizations in the public or private sector. Some examples of this could be E.g., Routine professional consulting; attendance and participation in seminars, symposia, workshops; membership in a professional organization.

59 Fill out Table 9 – Scholarly and Professional Activities – for self-study year and the previous four years. Summarize the scholarly and professional activities for each full-time faculty member for the self-study year and the previous four years. Make certain that dates for all activities (e.g., professional meetings, papers presented, etc.) are provided in the vita. Supporting evidence for scholarly and professional activities should be readily available for the site visit team to review. Although they do not need to be included in this summary, a current vita reflecting scholarly and professional activities for all part-time and adjunct faculty should be available to the site visit team.

60 These are the codes to use in each area of scholarship and professional activities.

61 Principle 6: Resources 6.1 Financial Resources 6.2 Facilities
6.3 Learning Resources 6.4 Educational Technology and Support 6.5 Off-Campus Locations This Principle is comprised of five sections. The philosophy behind this principle is that excellence in sport management education requires that appropriate resources be provided to the sport management programs, especially in relationship to the support provided to other academic units. The allocation of resources should be related to the specific mission and broad-based goals of your program. Adequate financial support for human resources, libraries, facilities, and equipment is essential to ensuring excellence in sport management programs. 61

62 6.1: Financial Resources Self Study Guidelines (UG, Master’s):
Describe budget development and amendment processes Submit Table 10, Educational and General Expenditures for self study year List non-faculty support personnel Provide Table 11, Salary Ranges by Rank State method for computing extra pay State rates of pay for part-time, adjunct faculty Describe tuition and fees for each program (identify catalog page numbers) Without U.S.-based regional accreditation, provide audited financial statements Doctoral Programs: Describe financial resources supporting the program The resources allocated to your program should be sufficient to support all aspects of its activities. Student learning outcomes, as measured by the outcomes assessment process, may deteriorate if the resources allocated to your program are inadequate. In the self study for Undergraduate and Masters Degree Programs: Briefly describe the budget development and budget amendment processes of the institution. This narrative should also include a description of the ways in which the results of the implementation academic unit/sport management program’s outcomes assessment plan are integrated into the budget process. Provide Table 10, Educational and General Expenditures, as shown in the sample table provided and I will show you an example in the next slide. List the number of support personnel (non-faculty) in your academic unit/sport management program by type of classification. Provide Table 11, Salary Ranges by Rank and I will show you an example. Where applicable, state the method of computation for extra pay of full-time faculty in the areas of: a. Overload b. Evening credit courses c. Off-campus credit courses d. Summer credit courses e. Non-credit courses State the rates of pay for part-time (adjunct) faculty who are teaching sport management courses. Identify the catalog page numbers which describe the tuition and fees for each academic program in sport management. For institutions without U.S.-based regional accreditation, provide a copy of the audited financial statements for your institution. Doctoral Programs: Describe the financial resources supporting the doctoral programs in sport management. Evaluate the sufficiency of these resources for accomplishing the mission and broad-based goals of the doctoral program. 62

63 This table should provide data for your institution for the self-study year, the year prior to the self-study year, and the budgeted amount for the self-study year. You may need your chief financial officer’s assistance in compiling this information.

64 This table should contain the actual full-time faculty salary ranges during the self-study year for each of the faculty ranks in your program. Do not include faculty who are on leave or on sabbatical and receiving a reduced rate during the period of absence.

65 6.2: Facilities Self Study Guidelines:
Describe physical facilities, plans for renovation, construction of new facilities Identify number and type of offices for faculty (Table 12) Evaluate adequacy, proximity of educational space (Table 13) There should be a sufficient number of classrooms and computer laboratories of an appropriate size and quality to provide a high-quality educational environment. And, full-time faculty should be provided with office space that allows them professional privacy. In the self-study: 1. Provide a narrative that describes the physical facilities, such as classrooms, computer laboratories, and faculty offices, available to sport management students and faculty. Plans for renovation of space or construction of new facilities associated with the sport management programs should be mentioned in this narrative. 2. Identify the number and type of offices for the faculty in Table 12 (I will show you an example in the next slide). Include a narrative evaluating the adequacy of office facilities. 3. Evaluate the adequacy and proximity of the educational space in Table 13 (An example of this table is also on the next slide). Include a narrative evaluating the adequacy and proximity of the educational space available to the academic unit/sport management program. Last, the site visit team should be shown sport management classrooms and faculty offices. 65

66 In Table 12, identify the number and type of offices for the faculty and in Table 13, evaluate the adequacy and proximity of the educational space.

67 6.3: Learning Resources Self Study Guidelines:
List of SM journals, databases available to students and faculty General statement of library support Narrative that assesses the adequacy of the learning resources available Library holdings should be sufficient in size and scope to (1) complement the total instructional program of your program; (2) provide incentives for individual learning, and (3) support appropriate scholarly and professional activities of the faculty. Evidence should exist that a focused and systematic acquisitions program is in operation, and that some form of faculty consultation and review is a continuing aspect of library acquisitions. In off-campus programs, there also should be adequate library support, which includes access to library facilities and/or electronic library access. Evidence should be available that off-campus students are provided library support for research and reading assignments comparable to that of the on-campus students. The site visit team will need to review the learning resources pertaining to the field of sport management and the annual budget for learning resources supporting sport management education. In the self study: Provide a list of the sport management-related journals and databases available to sport management students and faculty. Provide a general statement of the library support for the sport management programs. This statement should address: Inter-library loan program Library support for faculty Library support for students Acquisitions program, including faculty consultation and review Library support for off-campus programs 3. Provide a narrative that assesses the adequacy of the learning resources available to the academic unit/sport management program to support high-quality sport management education. 67

68 6.4: Educational Technology and Support
Self Study Guidelines: Description of instructional and educational technology and support available Assessment of instructional and educational technology available – projection of future acquisitions Your institution should obtain, maintain, and support instructional and educational technology that is sufficient in quality and quantity to support all of its sport management programs. In the self study: 1. Provide a description of the instructional and educational technology and support available to sport management students and faculty. This description should address the following issues: The technology that is available in the classrooms used by your program to students in computer labs and libraries to faculty in their offices at off-campus locations to support sport management students and faculty, both on and off campus 2. Provide an assessment of the instructional and educational technology available for sport management faculty and students. This review should include an assessment of the adequacy of technology support and a projection of future acquisitions. 68

69 6.5: Off-Campus Locations
Self Study Guidelines: Listing of each site and percentage of credit hours in SM taught at each location Describe resources available at each location Describe how you ensure that the quality of off- campus SM programs is comparable to those on- campus. Narrative of adequacy of resources at each location Undergraduate and graduate off-campus sport management programs should have comparable support to the on-campus programs. This support includes student access to full-time faculty, computers and other learning resources, and student advising. In the self study: Provide a listing of each of your sites and indicate the percentage of credit hours in sport management taught at each location. Describe the resources that are available at each off-campus location. This description should address: Full-time faculty Financial resources Facilities Libraries Equipment Provide a narrative that describes the ways in which you ensure that the quality of off-campus sport management programs and courses is comparable to the quality of the sport management programs and courses that are taught on-campus. For each off-campus instructional site, provide a narrative that contains your assessment of the adequacy of resources that are available at that location to achieve excellence in teaching and learning, and to accomplish the mission of your program at that location. 69

70 Principle 7: Internal and External Relationships
7.1 Internal Relationships 7.2 Admissions Processes 7.3 External Oversight 7.4 Business/Industry Linkages 7.5 External Cooperative Relationships 7.6 International Cooperation 7.7 Diversity in Sport 7.8 External Accountability Excellence in sport management education requires effective working relationships with other individuals and departments both within your institution and without, including effective linkages with the “real world” of sport management. It also also requires accountability to the public concerning student learning outcomes. Principle seven is composed of eight parts as you can see and we will discuss each one in depth. 70

71 Principle 7.1: Internal Relationships
In the self study: Approved institutional mission statement Approved program mission and broad-based goals Institutional org chart, program org chart, job description for department head List of institution’s governing board members Page numbers for academic policies Procedures for recommending degree candidates Excellence in sport management education requires that your sport management program have effective working relationships with individuals and other departments within your institution. Your program’s mission and broad-based goals must be consistent with those of your institution. In the self-study: Provide the approved statement of your institution’s mission. If the mission is listed in your institution’s catalog, provide the page numbers. Provide a copy of your program’s mission and broad-based goals. Provide a copy of: Your institution’s organizational chart. Your program’s organizational chart including the names of position holders. The job description for your program head. Provide a list of the names, titles, and organizational affiliations of your institution’s governing board members and state how often the governing board meets to review academic policies. Identify the catalog page numbers which describe all academic policies for sport management students. Describe the procedure for recommending degree candidates. Describe the procedure used by the Registrar’s Office to validate that the requirements for sport management degrees have been fulfilled. 71

72 Principle 7.2: Admissions Processes - undergraduate
In the self study (UG programs): Describe UG policies and procedures for admission to your program -- Freshmen, transfer students, acceptance of transfer credit Probation, suspension policies Students subject to academic sanctions Exceptions to admissions policies I am going to discuss the admissions processes for undergraduate and graduate programs separately. Students admitted to a sport management program must have a reasonable chance to succeed in the program. This requires admissions policies and processes that are appropriate to the sport management degree programs offered by your institution. In the self study for Undergraduate Programs: Describe the undergraduate policies and procedures for admission to your program in regard to the following areas (if these are located in your catalog, cite the page number(s): Admission of freshmen. Admission of transfer students from within your institution to your sport management programs. Admission of transfer students from other institutions to your sport management programs. Admission of transfer students between the traditional and nontraditional programs from within your institution in the field of sport management. Describe the policies and procedures pertaining to the acceptance of transfer of credit from other institutions and your method of validating the credits for both undergraduate and graduate programs in sport management. Describe the academic policies used by your program to place students on probation or suspension, and to readmit suspended students. Provide the number of students in each program who were subject to academic sanctions during the self-study year. Describe the exceptions you have made in the administration of your admissions policies for students in your program during the self-study year. 72

73 Principle 7.2: Admissions Processes – graduate degrees
In the self study (Master’s, Doctoral): Describe admissions policies and procedures for admission to your program Describe how graduate students are classified and any differences between formats (e.g., day, evening, online, distance, accelerated) Admissions requirements For Masters Programs: Each institution should have master’s degree program admission standards in place that will help to ensure that students have a reasonable chance to succeed in the program. The admission standards should be based on relevant criteria that have been shown, at the institutional level, to be highly correlated with student success. Doctoral Programs: Admission to doctoral programs is expected to be highly competitive; only those students that are likely to excel as academic professionals should be admitted to a doctoral program. Each institution should have doctoral program admission standards in place that will help ensure that students have a reasonable chance to succeed in the program. For both graduate programs: Describe the admission policies for each graduate program administered by your department. You may identify the page numbers in the student catalog that describe your admissions policies. Describe how the admission of students to your graduate degree programs conforms to the approved admissions policies, and identify any exceptions. Describe how graduate students are classified (e.g., unclassified, post-baccalaureate, non-degree, provisional, conditional, probationary, etc.), and describe how these classifications are applied. Provide the catalog page number as a supporting reference. Describe differences in admission policies and classification of students for each format in which your graduate degree sport management programs are offered (e.g., day, evening, weekend, online, distance, intensive, or accelerated). Explain how your graduate admission requirements attempt to ensure that students admitted to the graduate degree programs have a reasonable chance to succeed in the program. 73

74 Principle 7.3: External Oversight
In the self study: Copy of state or national charter Copy of most recent letter of affirmation of regional accreditation Any other relevant governmental authorizations (e.g., accreditations or approvals) For an institution to be considered for COSMA accreditation, it must have the legal authority to operate and to confer degrees. Furthermore, COSMA normally requires that an institution possess regional accreditation to be considered for accreditation by the COSMA. In the case of international institutions or domestic institutions without regional accreditation, the COSMA’s Board of Commissioners will consider eligibility for COSMA accreditation on a case-by-case basis. In the self study: Provide evidence of the legal authorization of your institution to operate and confer degrees. Normally this means providing a copy of your state or national charter. Identify which regional accrediting body provides your institutional accreditation. Provide a copy of that body’s most recent letter of affirmation or reaffirmation of regional accreditation in the Appendix of your self study. Describe any other relevant governmental authorizations that apply to your institution, such as governmental accreditations or approvals. 74

75 QUIZ #5 Internships Are internships required by COSMA? a) Yes b) No
c) Only for big institutions d) Only if you have enough faculty Are internships required by COSMA? a) Yes b) No c) Only for big institutions d) Only if you have enough faculty Internships are not required for COSMA accreditation, though many programs administer them. A list of possible business and industry linkages is on page 58, in the Principles document and they include: Advisory boards Executives in residence Guest speakers Institutional outreach programs Partnerships and joint venture agreements with organizations Professionally active student organizations in various sport management fields Internship programs Economic research bureaus

76 Principle 7.4: Business/Industry Linkages
In the self study: Describe activities and linkages with SM, industry, etc. -- SM advisory boards -- Executive-in-residence programs -- Internship programs -- Cooperative education programs -- Student organizations -- Business/economic research bureaus -- Any other significant linkages In professional programs, linkages with the sport management industry are essential. Both students and faculty gain through these interactions and practitioners can serve as role models and career counselors for students. They can help the faculty identify topics that may be worthy of scholarly pursuit and can provide input to administrators and faculty regarding changes in the curricula. They can also help bring speakers to campus, and place representatives of the institution before significant public forums. In the self study: Describe your program’s activities and linkages with sport management, industry, and other relevant organizations. This description should address any of the following linkages that apply to your program: Sport management advisory boards. Include the names, titles, and organizational affiliations of board members, and describe the council’s contributions to the academic unit/sport management program. Executive-in-residence programs. Describe the program and identify its major accomplishments. Internship programs. Describe the program and identify its major contributions. Cooperative education programs. Describe the program and identify its major contributions. Student organizations. Describe the purpose of the organization and the involvement of sport management or community leaders with the organization. Business/economic research bureaus. Describe the activities of the bureau and the benefits generated for the academic unit/sport management program and the community. Any other significant external linkages. Describe the program and its contributions. 76

77 Principle 7.5: External Cooperative Relationships
In the self study: List institutions to/from you receive transfer students Advising procedure for transfer students Relationship between your program and external educational institutions or organizations Joint degree programs Consortium agreements Cooperative, partnership arrangements For the purpose of defining roles, relationships, and procedures which promote the interests of transfer students, your program should provide evidence of articulation or course transfer relationships resulting from ongoing communications between the administration and faculty of your program and representatives of community colleges from which you regularly receives transfer students. Effective relationships should also be in place with institutions that provide a significant number of candidates for master’s degree programs. In the self study: List the principal institutions from/to your institution receives/sends transfer students. Copies of articulation or course transfer agreements in effect should be available for review by the site visit team. Describe the advising procedure for transfer students. Describe the relationship of your program with any other external educational institutions or organizations. This description should include all that apply to your program such as: Joint degree programs Consortium agreements Cooperative or partnership arrangements 77

78 Principle 7.6: International Cooperation
In the self study: 1. Describe how curricular and co-curricular programs prepare students to understand the global environment 2. Describe all cooperative arrangements between your department and international institutions or organizations 3. Describe any other international programs such as short-term international study tours COSMA expects its accredited members to be leaders in the internationalization of the sport management curriculum. This may include international experiences provided through the institution, other universities, or educational consortia; articulation agreements with institutions in other countries; or the promotion of student/faculty exchanges abroad. In the self study: Describe the ways in which your program prepares students to function effectively in a global sport management environment, including all of the following items that apply to your sport management programs. Describe the ways in which your curricular and co-curricular programs prepare students to understand the global environment. Describe all cooperative arrangements involving your program and international institutions or organizations. Provide contact information for these organizations, and provide the number of students and faculty involved in each program for the past three years. Describe any other international programs offered by your program, such as short-term international study tours. This description should include the number of students and faculty who have been involved in such programs for the past three years. 78

79 Principle 7.7: Diversity in Sport
In the self study: Describe how curricular and co-curricular activities prepare students to understand diverse sport environment Describe all cooperative agreements involving your program that provide students an opportunity to understand diversity in sport Identify and describe diversity-focused activities COSMA expects its accredited members to be leaders in educating students to effectively function in a diverse sport environment. This may include experiences provided by the institution, other universities, or educational consortia; articulation agreements with institutions that have differing populations, or the promotion of student/ faculty diversity training. In the self study: Describe the ways in which diversity in your program prepares students to function effectively in a diverse sport management environment, including all of the following items that apply to your programs. Describe the ways in which your curricular and co-curricular activities prepare students to understand and appreciate the diverse nature of the sport environment. Describe all cooperative arrangements involving your program and organizations/groups that would provide students with opportunities to acquire an understanding of diversity in sport. Please provide contact information for these organizations and provide the number of students and faculty involved in each program for the past three years. Identify and describe diversity-focused activities offered by your program. This description should include the number of students and faculty who have been involved in such programs for the past three years. 79

80 Principle 7.8: External Accountability
In the self study: Describe how you communicate information concerning key student learning outcomes to the public. Examples: website, Chronicle of Higher Ed, distribution of placement results, presentations to advisory boards, etc. Accountability concerning student learning outcomes is essential to excellence in sport management education. Public confidence and investment in education is enhanced when information concerning student achievement is made available to the public. In the self study: Provide a description of the ways in which you communicate information concerning key student learning outcomes to the public. Provide copies of this information and explain how the public can access this information. Examples include information published on your website, the Chronicle of Higher Education, distribution of placement results, and presentations to advisory boards. 80

81 Principle 8: Educational Innovation
In the self study: Describe institution's support for innovation Describe process in your program for encouraging educational innovation Provide recent examples, including improvements As cultural, demographic, and technological shifts occur in society, the needs of sport management change, along with the educational requirements for sport management students. These changes necessitate adaptations within sport management education, including teaching strategies appropriate for the diverse populations that are served. Individual sport management faculty members should be encouraged, supported, and rewarded for their creativity and for developing educational innovations related to course content and instruction. The development of new and different teaching strategies is essential to a thriving future in sport management education. In the self study: Provide a statement that reflects your institution’s posture regarding educational innovation. This statement should describe the institution’s support for innovation in your sport management department. Describe the process that is used by your program for encouraging educational innovation. Provide examples of educational innovation in recent years, including improvements in your sport management programs. That completes the documentation of Principles 1-8 for the self study document.

82 Self Study Organization
Volume 1 Title Page Table of Contents Background information Documentation of Accreditation Principles Volume 2 - Appendices Catalog (online URL okay) Abbreviated Syllabi Faculty CVs (full- and part-time) Outcomes Assessment Plan, Results, and Actions Strategic Plan Faculty Handbook (can be separate document) Use the following guidelines to organize your self study. Start with a Title Page: an example can be found in Figure 3 of the Appendix of the Principles manual. Include a Table of contents with page numbers. In “Volume 1” of the Self Study, include a section called “Background Information.” In it, please: Identify the name and title of each individual who participated in preparing the self study. In one or two paragraphs, provide a brief history of the institution. You can also cite catalog page numbers where this is located. In one or two paragraphs, provide a brief history of your sport management program. List each sport management degree program for which you are seeking COSMA accreditation. Describe any situations present at your institution that require a special understanding during the accreditation process. This could include any unforeseen changes to your faculty or curricula, new off-campus sites that are being established, new delivery methods being used (online or hybrid), new technology being incorporated, or changes made to your program as a result of writing the self study that are not documented in the self study. Next include the documentation of the Accreditation Principles: This is what we covered primarily in this three part webinar series. And, a template is available on the COSMA website or me to get a copy. “Volume 2” are the Appendices of your self-study. In this section, place materials that are too long or bulky to include in Volume 1 such as abbreviated course syllabi, faculty C/Vs, your institution’s catalog, the faculty handbook, longer documents that provide detailed information about your internship program or business and community linkages, as two examples.

83 Scheduling the COSMA Site Visit
Validates Self Study Two days, team of two reviewers Visit includes meeting with SM faculty, assessment officer, top administration, other faculty, students, and facilities tour. Team report generated and reviewed on-site Now, all of the preparation of your self study leads into preparation for the site visit. The purpose of the site visit is to validate the self study. Normally, the site visit lasts two days and consists of a two-person team. The visit might be longer or involve more reviewers if you have one or more satellite campuses and/or you have a number of programs that are administrated in a complex way. The length of the site visit and number of reviewers will be determined by the COSMA Board of Commissioners. The site visit consists of meetings with key personnel, such as administrators, faculty, students, alumni, advisory board members, and the outcomes assessment coordinator (if applicable), and anyone else who plays a key role in your program. The site visit team will also take a tour of the physical facilities of your campus including sport management department faculty offices, classrooms, and libraries. The site visit team writes a report that is submitted to COSMA headquarters (me). I write a summary of the report and send a copy to the primary representative (the person in charge of the accreditation process – this person is not always the department head), the institution's president and CAO or other top administrator. You respond to this report in writing. 83

84 Site Visit Assignments
Schedule visits 3-6 months in advance COSMA staff, BOC assigns two person team as early as possible Conditions Avoid conflicts of interest Balance and representation Costs The site visit is usually scheduled 3-6 months in advance. Usually, I know when a program is ready to submit their self study and I work with you on timing it most efficiently. The two-person site visit team is recruited and they are given the self study at least 90 days prior to the visit. In assigning the site reviewers, we consider the balance of representation of types of programs and institutions between the two reviewers and as they are similar and not similar to the program being reviewed; we try to find reviewers within a reasonable distance to the program without coming from a competitor program; and in general, we avoid conflicts of interest such as previous academic or personal relationships or business partnerships. I check with everyone before finalizing the site visit team to make sure that there are no conflicts of interest. In the case that there is, I find a replacement team member.

85 Honoraria and Travel Reimbursement
Institution responsible for paying all costs: application fee, honorarium, other site visit costs Travel Hotel Meals Other costs (e.g. travel to and from home airport) An institution seeking accreditation is responsible for paying all of the site visits costs, which include the accreditation application fee, the site visit team honorarium, and other costs directly related to the site visit. Each member of the site team is paid a modest honorarium for the professional work performed during the site visit. The stipend paid is based on the number of days worked during the site visit. The Team Chair receives $300 per day and the other member of the team receives $200 per day. The higher stipend for the Team Chair is to cover pre-visit planning and post-visit report writing. These modest amounts represent our attempt to minimize the costs of accreditation, and at the same time to compensate and recognize the professional services of each site team member.

86 Expectations of Site Reviewers
The site visit will be conducted in strict accordance with all of the current COSMA published guidelines. Confidentiality The site visit team will not express any opinions as to whether accreditation will be granted. The site visit team’s report will contain sufficient information to allow the BOC to make a fair and informed accreditation decision. The site reviewers are held to the following expectations: They must read your self-study report thoroughly before making the visit. They must arrive on time at the site and work with the other site team member in a harmonious manner. They should handle the site visit evaluation activities in a professional and expeditious manner. They should complete the site visit assignment while at your institution and prepare a written report of the findings within two weeks of the site visit. They should perform the site visit evaluation objectively, not letting personal bias interfere with the assignment. The site team members play a key role in maintaining the integrity of the COSMA accreditation process. Accordingly, all members of the team, before accepting an assignment, must agree to avoid impropriety, to avoid being partial, to refrain from inappropriate activity, and to preserve the confidential nature of the information reviewed during the site visit. 86

87 Campus Coordinator Role
Person responsible for accreditation process (not necessarily the department chair) Helps team make travel plans, including transport to and from their hotel to your campus Develops site visit schedule Makes sure site visit stays on schedule Organizes on campus meeting room for team The campus coordinator is the person, in general, who is in charge of writing and putting together the self study document and arranging all logistics for the site visit. These include planning the travel, hotel, and transportation to and from the hotel to the campus; drafting the site visit schedule and modifying it as necessary, making sure the site visit remains on schedule, and organizing the meeting room for the site visit team. 87

88 QUIZ #6 Materials available on-site
Which of the following items should you have available on-site for the site review team? a) Faculty handbook b) Course catalog c) Outcomes assessment plan d) Copy of most recent regional accreditation study e) All of the above Which of the following items should you have available on-site for the site review team? a) Faculty handbook b) Course catalog c) Outcomes assessment plan d) Copy of most recent regional accreditation study e) All of the above The correct answer is E, all of the above.

89 On-site Materials Course syllabi Institutional course catalog
Copy of last regional accreditation self-study report and findings Faculty member vitae Faculty handbook O/A Plan Summary of realized outcomes Internship Manual Each site visit team member will bring his/her copy of your self-study document to the site (often electronically). However, you will have additional materials available for the site team in their meeting room. Items frequently placed in the meeting room for the accreditation site visit team include: Course syllabi (courses in the Sport Management degree curricula). Extra copies of the institution’s catalog. A copy of the last Regional accreditation self-study report and a copy of the findings of that visiting team. A copy of each faculty member’s vita (include only the faculty who were employed during the self-study year, full-time and part-time). A copy of the faculty handbook. A copy of your Outcomes Assessment Plan and a summary of the realized outcomes resulting from the implementation of the Outcomes Assessment Plan during the self-study year. Internship manual (if applicable) The visiting team may need other materials and if so, the campus coordinator of the site visit will assist the team in obtaining those materials. 89

90 Site Visit - Day 1 Schedule 8:00 am
Meet with dept. head to discuss two day visit 9:00 am Meet with President and/or Chief Academic Officer 9:30 am Meet with Outcomes Assessment Coordinator to review institutional plan 10:30 am Review Sport Management O/A plan with dept. head Noon Lunch with faculty (no administrators present) 1:30 pm Work time for site team & dept. head to validate self- study and ask questions (2 ½ - 3 hours) 6pm Dinner The Campus Coordinator will prepare a written schedule and agenda for the site visit, in concert with the site visit Team Chair. Institutions differ so much that it is difficult to present an all-inclusive outline for all visits, but there are several meetings and tasks that are normally scheduled during a site visit. Some of these include: Meeting with the head of the sport management department as the first item of business. Meeting with the top-level administrators of the institution, usually the President, the Chief Academic Officer and/or the Dean. Meeting with the campus coordinator of outcomes assessment. Validating the self-study statistical contents and narrative contents. This is when the site visit team will work in their meeting room for two to three hours. Meet with some (or possibly all) of the faculty if appropriate and convenient who teach sport management courses. This is often done collectively. 90

91 Site Visit - Day 2 Schedule 8:00 am
Meet with students majoring in sport management 9:00 am Tour facilities (library, classrooms, computer labs, etc.) 10:30 am Exit interview with dept. head (and others, if desired) Noon Lunch meeting with Advisory Board (or other parties) 1:30 pm Site team works on draft report/time for unexpected issues 3:00 pm Site team departs from campus Interview some of the students enrolled in sport management courses. This is often done collectively. Have a brief tour of the physical facilities used by the sport management students, including the library. If an off-campus site delivers 25% or more of student credit hours for your department, an off-site visit will be required. Exit interview with the head of the sport management department. This meeting can be attended by anyone that you want – it involves discussing the findings of the site visit team – strengths and weaknesses. In general, it is important to remember that the site team must allocate adequate time to validate the information submitted in the self-study and this may be done in coordination with the Campus Coordinator of the site visit. 91

92 Site Visit Report Each team member completes his/her own checklist
Team chair writes final report (from template) and sends to COSMA Address findings related to areas of non-compliance Include strengths and weaknesses in areas of compliance The team keeps all materials until the BOC meets to make their accreditation decision The Team Chair is responsible for preparing the site visit team’s final summary report and for submitting it me within two weeks after the visit. They will address areas of compliance with the COSMA principles, areas of noncompliance, and strengths of the program. 92

93 What COSMA Does After the Site Visit
Institution receives letter summarizing visit May include request for additional information All materials sent to one member of Board of Commissioners – self-study, site visit team report, any additional information Commissioner reviews materials and prepares detailed report to present at next Board meeting Once I receive the site visit report, I will write and send a summary of the findings to the Campus Coordinator and send a copy to the President and Chief Academic Officer. I will give you a deadline for responding to the report which is usually about a month prior to the Board of Commissioner’s meeting. One BOC member is provided all materials related to your program and he or she completes a summary matrix of the findings and his or her recommendations to the entire BOC. The Board then makes an accreditation decision and decides what kind of follow-up is required by the program (if any).

94 Commissioners' Accreditation Decision
Accredited with Notes Accredited with Observations Accreditation Deferred Accreditation Denied The accreditation decisions that the BOC can make are as follows: Accredited with Notes – this means that there are areas of noncompliance that must be addressed and remediated within three years of being accredited Accredited with Observations – these are areas that do not have to be addressed but are recommended Accreditation Deferred – this means an accreditation decision has been deferred to a later date, within three years, pending remedial action or more information from the program on the areas of noncompliance Accreditation Denied – the program is in significant noncompliance with a number of principles or has lost its regional accreditation. Please note that it is highly unlikely that a program would get as far as a site visit and have their accreditation denied. I will be working with you quite closely prior to this.

95 Evaluation of the Site Team’s Visit
Fill out and submit evaluation of your experience Site team members evaluate each other All comments kept confidential Questions include: Professional behavior of the team Anything overlooked by the team Strengths and/or limitations of any team member An institution that has just undergone a site visit by COSMA has the opportunity to assess the work of the members of the site visit team. In addition, members of the team are encouraged to review each other’s work during the visit. We want to use top-level evaluators in the accreditation process, so it is important to review the site visit performance. I have created surveys for the institution and each site reviewer to complete that cover a number of aspects of the site review process. Some of the areas that are addressed are: The professional behavior of the team members. Aspects of the institution’s academic Sport Management department/unit that might have been overlooked by the team. Strengths and/or limitations of individual members of the team. Your comments are held in strict confidence and the performance reviews should be sent to me.

96 Annual Reports Each institution in Candidacy Status and accredited institution submits an Annual Report Respond to Notes compliance Outcomes Assessment Results Program and Administrative Changes Requested in May, due by July 31 Annual reports are required of all programs who have achieved Candidacy Status or who are accredited. The annual report is the opportunity to show how areas of noncompliance outlined by the site visit team and agreed upon by the BOC are being remediated. You also report the findings of your outcomes assessment data collection within the annual report. In addition, it is the place where you would share any changes to your program such as new degree programs, changes in department head, moving from one college to another, and any other significant administrative or programmatic changes. Annual reports are requested in May and are due no later than July 31 each year. 96

97 Conclusions COSMA membership
Utilize Candidacy Status process in development of Outcomes Assessment plan Consult with me (Heather Alderman) along the way Use internal resources Don’t be afraid to revise plan as needed Attend as many trainings as you want The first step in this process is to become a member of COSMA. The Candidacy Status process can help you design an excellent outcomes assessment plan. Please use me to guide you and give you suggestions as well as utilize the people and offices on your campus that do assessment. Be open to revising your plans as you go along and attend as many trainings as you want, and that includes just ing or talking to me about your questions and concerns.

98 Conclusions Curriculum – CPC coverage Faculty
Doctorally vs. Professionally qualified Teaching load Coverage of CPC areas Evaluation, development, policies 3. Scholarly & Professional Activities 4. Resources We also discussed in-depth the curriculum requirements as they relate to the Common Professional Component, Faculty Qualifications, scholarly and professional activities, and resources.

99 Conclusions Internal Relationships a. Admissions procedures
b. Transfers 2. External Relationships Internships Advisory Boards/Alumni International Cooperation 3. Educational Innovation 4. Site Visit Process Last, we reviewed Principle 7 about your internal admissions procedures and transfer student policies and Principle 8 about educational innovation. We also discussed in-depth the site visit process and what to expect from the site visit team, me, and the Board of Commissioners. This is the end of this training that has covered the accreditation process and all eight Principles of COSMA accreditation. This same training is available on the COSMA website in the format of three webinars. I hope you have a solid understanding of this process and its components and I hope you were able to learn useful and valuable information about COSMA accreditation. If you have any questions that don’t get answered today or that you think of after today, you can always me at

100 Upcoming Training/Events
Members Only: Open Conference Call with a BOC member – July 2013 – TBD Management Day – April 25, 1pm – 5pm 4th Annual Member Meeting Austin, TX – May 29, 11:30am – 1:00pm Site Reviewer – May 29, 1:00pm – 3:00pm Accreditation Process/Site Reviewer training - @SEVT, November 20-22, 2013 To further help you as you go through the process, I am hosting “live” conference calls with one Board of Commissioner member who is available to answer your questions during the call. The first call was held in March and the next call is scheduled for May. Tomorrow, I am giving a 45 minute presentation about COSMA during Sport Management Day. Everyone is welcome to attend the 4th annual COSMA Member meeting on Wednesday, May 29 from 11:30-1:30pm – it’s not just for members and will be held just before the NASSM Conference in Austin, TX. I will hold this same site reviewer training from 1:30-3pm just after the Annual Member meeting at NASSM. Additional training for both the accreditation process and site reviewers will be held in November concurrent with the SEVT conference in Columbia, SC.

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