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The Nature of Transition Disks in Perseus, Taurus and Auriga Lucas Cieza 1, Matthias Schreiber 2, Gisela Romero 2, Jonathan Williams 1 Alberto Rebassa-Mansergas.

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Presentation on theme: "The Nature of Transition Disks in Perseus, Taurus and Auriga Lucas Cieza 1, Matthias Schreiber 2, Gisela Romero 2, Jonathan Williams 1 Alberto Rebassa-Mansergas."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Nature of Transition Disks in Perseus, Taurus and Auriga Lucas Cieza 1, Matthias Schreiber 2, Gisela Romero 2, Jonathan Williams 1 Alberto Rebassa-Mansergas 1 University of Hawaii, 2 Universidad de Valparaiso, Chile, ABSTRACT: We have obtained mm wavelength photometry, high-resolution optical spectroscopy, and AO near-infrared imaging for a sample of 31 transition objects in the Perseus, Taurus, and Auriga molecular clouds. We use these data to estimate disk masses, multiplicity, and accretion rates in order to investigate the mechanisms potentially responsible for their inner holes. Following our previous studies in other regions, we combine disk masses, accretion rates and multiplicity data with other information, such as SED morphology and fractional disk luminosity to classify the disks as strong candidates for the following categories: grain-growth dominates disks, giant planet forming disk, photoevaporating disks, debris disks, and cicumbinary disks. Combining our sample of 31 transition disks with those from our previous studies results in a sample of 74 transition objects that have been selected, characterized, and classified in an homogenous way. We study this combined sample in the context of the current paradigm of the evolution and dissipation of protoplanetary disks and use its properties to constrain different aspects of the key processes driving their evolution. References Alexander R. et al. 2006, MNRAS 369, 216 Carpenter et al. 2006, ApJL, 651, 49 Cieza, L. et al. 2010, ApJ, 712, 925 Cieza, L. et al. 2012, submitted to ApJ Dullemond, C. & Dominik C. 2004, A&A 421,1075 Romero et al. 2012, submitted to ApJ Siess et al. 2000, A&A, 358, 593 RESULTS The results of our survey are described in Cieza et al. (2010;2012) and Romero et al. (2012). We find that transition disks are a very heterogeneous group of objects with a wide range of SED morphologies, disk luminosities, disk masses ( < 0.5 to 40 M jup ), and accretion rates (<10E11 to 10E7 M solar /yr). Since the properties of our transition disks point toward distinct processes driving the evolution of each disk, we have been able to identify very strong candidates for the following disk categories: circumbinary disks, grain-growth dominated disks, photoevaporating disks, debris disks, and (giant) planet-forming disks. Some SED examples are shown below. Fig 1. (Giant) Planet-forming disks: single accreting objects with little or no excess in the near-IR and rising SEDs in the mid-IR. Their SEDs imply the presence of sharp inner holes; however, these holes are not empty as circumstellar gas still flows onto the stars. These disks are relatively massive (few x M JUP ) and their properties are best explained by ongoing giant planet formation. Wide H profiles indicating accretion Fig 2. Grain growth dominated disks: Accreting objects with falling SEDs in the mid-IR. Their properties are best explained by grain growth and dust settling resulting in reduced dust opacities and small flaring angles with respect to those of typical disks around CTTSs (Dullemond & Dominik 2004). Wide H profiles indicating accretion Narrow H profiles indicating chromospheric origin Fig 3. Photoevaporating disks: non-accreting objects with very low disk masses ( ; e.g., higher than those of bright debris disks). They are consistent with primordial disks dissipating through photoevaporation from the central star (e.g., Alexander et al. 2006). Fig 4. Debris disks: non-accreting objects with very low disk masses (< 1 M JUP ) and low fractional disk luminosities (L disk /L star < ). Their properties are consistent with being young debris disks. The SED of typical CTTSs GOALS 1)Constrain the different processes driving disk evolution (e.g., accretion, grain growth, photoevaporation, planet formation and dynamical interactions) 2) Identify systems with strong evidence for ongoing giant planet formation to be followed-up in detail with ALMA and other facilities CONCLUSIONS 1) Massive circumbinary disks are exceedingly rare (objects such as those in Fig. 1 do not seem to be close binaries based on follow up aperture masking observations). 2) The incidence of (giant) planet forming disks candidates is much smaller than that of giant planets in the solar neighborhood (~5% vs ~20%). The giant planet disk candidates identified in our survey are likely to represent special cases, where multiple massive planets may be present. 3) Virtually all non-accreting objects (i.e.,WTTSs), including the photoevaporating disks in Fig 3., have very low disks masses (< 1 M JUP ). Since the disk masses at the time of the formation of the inner holes predicted by photoevaporation models are directly connected to photoevaporation rates, the lack of more massive WTTS disks favors small photoevaporation rates (~ M solar yr -1 ). 4) Debris disks and photoevaporating disk candidates are more common around hotter stars, consistent with the idea that primordial disks dissipate faster around more massive objects. 5)Grain growth-dominated disks account for ~40% of our sample of transition disks around K and M-type stars, confirming that grain-growth and dust settling play a major role in the evolution of primordial circumstellar disks. 6) A preliminary analysis of the age distribution of disks with signatures of dynamical clearing by recently formed giant planets reveals a lack of such objects among the youngest stars in the sample. This favors core accretion as the main planet formation mechanism and a 2-3 Myr formation timescale. 7) Transition disks are excellent laboratories to study disk evolution and planet formation and thus prime targets for detailed follow-up studies with ALMA and other facilities. Narrow H profiles indicating chromospheric origin Questions? The transition disk sample in the H-R diagram. All stars earlier than G5 have non-accreting disks, either photoevaporating disks or debris disk, consistent with the idea that primordial disks dissipate faster around more massive objects (Carpenter et al. 2006).There is a lack of (giant) planet-forming disk candidates among the youngest stars in the sample. This favors core accretion as the main planet formation mechanism and a 2-3 Myr formation timescale (isochrones are from Siess et al. 2000).


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