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WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION SCHOOL NUTRITION TEAM SUMMER 2011 Recipe Analysis.

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Presentation on theme: "WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION SCHOOL NUTRITION TEAM SUMMER 2011 Recipe Analysis."— Presentation transcript:

1 WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION SCHOOL NUTRITION TEAM SUMMER 2011 Recipe Analysis

2 RECIPE ANALYSIS Determine what a serving of a recipe contributes towards meeting the food-based menu planning requirements

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7 RECIPE ANALYSIS Applies to: Your School Recipes USDA Quantity Recipes Older versions (prior to April 2006) Variations such as omitting ingredients or using alternate ingredients that contribute to meal pattern

8 Focus 1. Calculating contribution a serving of standardized recipe makes towards meeting menu planning system using yield information and Appendix A of USDAs Food Buying Guide 2. Standardization process and how it relates to recipe analysis 3. Making substitutions in recipes using WI processed commodities products and converting to As Purchased units as part of standardization process

9 Recipe Analysis Class Organization 1. Introduction to resources/tools for recipe analysis process 2. Brief review of USDA Food Buying Guide and yield information needed for recipe analysis 3. Recipe analysis using Appendix A of FBG – explanation and exercise 4. Review of standardization process and specific information needed for recipe analysis process with examples of how to incorporate WI processed products

10 Four Resources 1.USDAs Food Buying Guide 2. USDAs Quantity Recipes 3.Wisconsin Processed Commodities Meal Pattern Contribution Guide based on Fact Sheets 4.Measuring Success with Standardized Recipes (NFSMI/USDA Team Nutrition)

11 Resource #1 USDA Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs

12 Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs January 1984 Revised November 2001 Updated December 2007

13 Sections of the FBG 7 Sections & Index: Introduction/Tables M/MA V/F G/B Milk Other Foods Appendices A–E

14 Tables and Figures: Use for Accuracy; Use for Efficiency _________ Child Nutrition Programs Tables and Figures

15 Table 1: List of Abbreviations and Symbols Used Use this table as a resource to ease written communication and avoid production errors.

16 1 lb 3 oz = (16 oz + 3 oz) = 1.19 lb 119 oz = (112 oz + 7 oz) = 7.44 lb Table 5: Decimal Weight Equivalents

17 1/8 = /3 = /3 = ÷ 8 = ÷ 3 = ÷ 3 = /4 =0.251/2 = 0.503/4 = ÷ 4 = ÷ 2 = ÷ 4 = /8 = /8 = /8 = ÷ 8 = ÷ 8 = ÷ 8 = Table 6: Decimal Equivalents of Commonly Used Fractions

18 Table 7: Converting Decimals to Nearest Portion of a Cup for V/F One of the steps in the recipe analysis process includes converting decimal equivalents to nearest portion

19 Important Point: Do Not Confuse Weight and Volume Measure Weight is measured in ounces and is used for determining portion size for most M/MA and many G/B. Tool: scale Volume is measured in fluid ounces and is used for determining portion size of V/F and milk. Tools: measuring devises

20 An 8 fl oz Cup May Not Weigh 8 oz Fill an 8 fl oz cup with lettuce and another with mashed potatoes. Their volume measures exactly the same (8 fl. oz. or 1 cup). Will they weigh the same? Will either weigh 8 oz?

21 Common Measures for Volume, Liquid & Dry Teaspoons, tablespoons, cups, fractions of a cup, pints, quarts, and gallons are all volume measures which can be described in fluid ounces.

22 22 Section 1 ________ Child Nutrition Programs Meat/Meat Alternates

23 23 Section 2 ___________ Child Nutrition Programs Vegetables/ Fruits (V/F)

24 Section 3 Grains/ Breads(G/B) Child Nutrition Programs

25 Column 1: Food As Purchased (As Purchased) Column 1 tells you the name of the food item and the form(s) in which it is purchased. Are the apples fresh, canned, frozen, or dehydrated? Food As Purchased (AP)

26 Column 2: Purchase Unit Common purchase units of food such as: Pounds Gallons No. 10 can No. 300 can Purchase Unit

27 Column 3: Servings per Purchase Unit (Edible Portion) Column 3 lists the amount of food to purchase or order based on the Servings per the designated Purchase Unit in column 2 Servings per Purchase Unit, EP

28 Column 4: Serving Size per Meal Contribution Serving sizes listed in column 4 are commonly used Serving Size per Meal Contribution

29 Columns 3 & 4 For example, a No. 10 can yields /4-c servings of canned apple slices. Servings per Purchase Unit, EP Serving Size per Meal Contribution

30 Column 5: Purchase Units for 100 Servings Column 5 is used to determine the amount of food to purchase for 100 servings Purchase Units for 100 Servings

31 Column 6 Column 6 provides additional information about the food item when it is served in a different form Additional Information

32 Column 6 For example, it takes 1 pound of apples, fresh, count, AP, to provide 0.91 pound of ready-to- serve raw, cored, unpeeled apple, EP. 1 No. 10 Can = 89.0 oz (11-7/8 c) drained apple. Additional Information

33 Exercise #1 Use Food Buying Guide to find number of servings in purchase unit for items listed Page numbers are provided Mark the pages with post-it notes

34 RECIPE ANALYSIS USING Food Buying Guide Yield Information Appendix A

35 Appendix A: Recipe Analysis Purpose: Calculate the contributions of a recipes ingredients toward meeting components: * Meat/Meat Alternate *Vegetable/Fruit *Grains/Breads

36 Recipe Analysis Steps 1.List ingredients 2.Record AP weight or volume 3.Record purchase units 4.Record the number of servings per purchase unit 5.Calculate the M/MA contribution 6.Calculate the V/F contribution 7.Calculate the G/B contribution 8.Record the portions per recipe 9.Record the final rounded down calculated crediting answers

37 Recipe Analysis Step 1 Column 1 List Ingredients

38 Recipe Analysis Step 1 Column 1: List ingredients List only ingredients that make contribution Record description of each ingredient, for example fat content of ground beef Group ingredients that contribute to the same component

39 6-39 Recipe Analysis Step 2 Column 2 Quantity of Ingredients as Purchased

40 Recipe Analysis Step 2 Column 2: Record As Purchased weight or volume of ingredients Convert ounces to decimal equivalent of a pound using Table 5 (page I-36) Quantity must be in the same units as the purchase unit recorded in column #1

41 Column 3 Record Purchase Units Recipe Analysis Step 3

42 Recipe Analysis Step 3 Column 3: Record purchase units How is the product purchased (for example, No. 10 cans, pounds, dozen, etc.)? Find this information in Column 2 of the Food Buying Guide Quantity must be in the same units as the purchase unit recorded in recipe analysis form Column 2

43 Recipe Analysis Step 4 Column 4 Servings per Purchase Unit in Food Buying Guide

44 Recipe Analysis Step 4 Column 4: Record the number of servings per purchase unit Find this information in Column 3 of the Food Buying Guide Pay attention to the description of food as served when making selection of information to use. Example: Raw carrots in recipe are cooked when served, then use yield information for cooked carrots

45 Recipe Analysis Step 5 Column 5 Meat/Meat Alternate Contribution

46 Recipe Analysis Step 5 Column 5: Calculate the Meat/Meat Alternate (M/MA) Contribution For each M/MA - multiply number in Column 2 by number in Column 4 Record in Column 5 to two decimal points If more than one M/MA, add all numbers in Column 5 and record in Total row. Divide the total of Column 5 by the number of portions in recipe. Round down to the nearest 1/4 ounce Note: USDA crediting rule: must be 1/8 ounce

47 Recipe Analysis Step 6 Column 6 Vegetables/Fruit Contribution

48 Recipe Analysis Step 6 Column 6: Calculate the Vegetable/Fruit (V/F) contribution For each V/F, multiply number in Column 2 by number in Column 4, and record in Column 6 to two decimal points If more than one V/F, add all numbers in Column 6 to determine the total number of 1/4-cup V/F servings in the recipe Divide the total of Column 6 by 4 to convert to cups Divide the number of cups by the number of portions the recipe yields. Round the number to two decimal places and convert to the nearest portion of a cup by using Table 7 (see page I-37 of Food Buying Guide)

49 Recipe Analysis Step 7 Column 7 Grains/Breads Contribution

50 Recipe Analysis Step 7 Column 7: Calculate the G/B contribution. For each G/B, multiply number in Column 2 by number in Column 4, and record in Column 7 to two decimal points. If more than one G/B, add all numbers in Column 7 to determine the total number of G/B servings in the recipe and record Divide the number of G/B servings by the number of portions the recipe yields Round the number down to the nearest 1/4-serving of G/B

51 Recipe Analysis Steps 8 and 9 Steps 8 and 9 Final calculations for crediting

52 Recipe Analysis Steps 8 & 9 Do each task in Columns 5, 6, and 7. 1.Record the totals for each column 2.Record the portions per recipe; this will be the same number in each column 3.Divide the total as indicated in each column 1.Round down 2.Record the contribution of each portion

53 Resource #2 USDA Quantity Recipes Refer to handout to access latest versions on-line

54 Contribution is Calculated for Each Serving on USDA Quantity Recipes

55 USDA Quantity Recipes Note: Not necessary to throw out the older ones, if in use BUT - Must calculate contribution based on new yields in Food Buying Guide (Original November 2001 publication & December 2007 updates) Must consider contribution if ingredients omitted/substitutions made

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57 Contribution of a Serving

58 Contribution 1 burrito provides 2 oz equivalent meat/meat alternate, ¼ cup of vegetable, and 1 ½ servings of grains/breads SERVING: Recipe must be followed exactly (ingredients, amounts, preparation, portion size, etc.)

59 Contribution 1 burrito provides 2 oz equivalent meat/meat alternate, ¼ cup of vegetable, and 1 ½ servings of grains/breads SERVING: What changes would make (lunch and/or breakfast) if standardizing? How do the changes effect the contribution?

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62 Contribution a Serving Makes January 2007 Version

63 Modifications to USDA Quantity Recipes Spaghetti with Meat Sauce – D-35 Change % fat content for ground beef Add shredded cheddar cheese (Review completed analysis on page A-8 of FBG) Other considerations: What if you used tomato or marinara sauce instead of tomato paste and diced canned tomatoes? What if you used elbow macaroni instead of spaghetti noodles?

64 Variation to Quantity Recipes Omit ingredients? Use different fat content (ground beef)? Use beef crumbles in place of ground beef? Use other items that are state processed commodity item which may vary from year to year? Do you combine your pasta and sauce? No consistency in what is used? Other variations?

65 Resource # 3 Wisconsin Processed Commodities Posted at: Handout includes Child Nutrition (CN) label information plus ounces of creditable meat/meat alternate in pound of product for recipe analysis purpose

66 Converting Product Information for Recipe Analysis - Meat/Meat Alternate Need ounces of creditable meat/meat alternate Calculate by dividing 2 ounces by equivalency to determine % of creditable m/ma Multiply % by 16 and round down Example: Beef Crumbles AdvancePierre ( ) (1) 2 ounces ÷ 2.19 =.913 ( 2).913 x 16 = 14.6 ounces of creditable meat/meat alternate in pound of product Note: 100 (2 oz) servings x z = 219 oz ÷ 16 = lbs., compared with 17 lbs. ground beef (20% fat)

67 Converting Product Information for Recipe Analysis - Meat/Meat Alternate Need ounces of creditable meat/meat alternate Calculate by dividing 2 ounces by equivalency to determine % of creditable m/ma Multiply % by 16 and round down Example Chicken Fajita Strips Gold Kist/Pilgrims Pride (1325) 1) 2 ounces ÷ 2.05 =.97 2).97 x 16 ounces = 15.5 of creditable meat/meat alternate in pound

68 Converting Product Information for Recipe Analysis - Meat/Meat Alternate Need ounces of creditable meat/meat alternate Calculate by dividing 2 ounces by equivalency to determine % of creditable m/ma Multiply % by 16 and round down Example Pork Taco Filling JTM (CP5205 or 5205CE) 1)2 ounces ÷ 3.17 =.63 2).63 x 16 ounces = of creditable meat/meat alternate in pound Note: 1/8 cup of v/f if serving 3.17 oz. by weight or TBSP (by measure)

69 Where to Start – Alternative Ingredients Determine how much is needed to meet menu planning requirements Test recipe to see if it meets customer expectations Standardize for alternate ingredients

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71 Quick Review Standardized Recipes

72 Resource #4 Measuring Success – Standardized Recipes Basic recipe standardization information

73 Recipe Standardization Process Quick Review Definition: One that has been tried, adapted, and retried several times for use by a given foodservice operation and has been found to produce the same good results and yield every time when the exact procedures are used with the same type of equipment and the same quantity and quantity of ingredients.

74 Recipe Standardization Quick Review Eleven Benefits of Standardized Recipes 1. Consistent food quality 2. Predictability of yield 3. Customer satisfaction 4. Consistent nutrient content 5. Food cost control 6. Efficient purchasing procedures

75 Recipe Standardization Quick Review Eleven Benefits of Standardized Recipes (cont.) 7. Inventory control 8. Labor control 9. Increased employee confidence 10. Reduced recordkeeping 11. Successful completion of State/Federal reviews

76 Recipe Standardization Quick Review Negative Impact - If Recipes are not Standardized 1. Cost 2. Nutrients per serving 3. Customer satisfaction

77 Helpful Tools Eight Steps to Standardize a Recipe Basics at Glance (NFSMI) Recipe format USDA Quantity Recipes on-line format DPI format Evaluation tools for reviewing recipes during recipe standardization (found in Measuring Success)

78 Recipe Standardization Process Quick Review Essentials for Recipe Analysis 1. Specific ingredients 2. Weight/Volume for each ingredient converted for ease and accuracy in preparation plus consistent with information in Food Buying Guide 3. Serving size 4. Recipe yield (in number of servings)

79 Review of Steps for Recipe Analysis First step of recipe standardization is to meet customer expectations Include necessary information in recipes Convert ingredients to as purchased units to use FBG for purchasing & recipe analysis Determine creditable amount in as purchased units for WI processed products and other items not found in the FBG Use recipe analysis process to determine how a serving of a recipe contributes to the menu planning requirements

80 Exercise #2 Take the USDA recipe for Beef Taco Pie, and calculate the contribution when changing it to Meaty Taco Pie (using commodity pork taco filling and adding canned black beans). Evaluate to determine contribution a serving makes towards meeting meal pattern requirement Blank forms are available Note what changes may be made, if any, to maximize the contribution a serving makes towards meeting the food-based menu planning system requirements

81 Fill in the worksheet

82 Recipe Analysis Questions

83 In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C or call toll free (866) (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) ; or (800) (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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