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© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 6: Recipes and.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 6: Recipes and."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 6: Recipes and Food Cost Recipes help organize, select ingredients, choose equipment, and help you track food cost

2 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

3 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. What Is a Recipe? Written record of ingredients and preparation Improves efficiency Increases profits Gives each guest the same value each time

4 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Standardized Recipes Tailored to suit the needs of a restaurant Ensure consistent quality Monitor efficiency Allow the wait staff to answer guests questions

5 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Recipes Should Include Main ingredient Cuisine, method Menu part Station Basic recipe Name title Yield information Number of portions Total weight and volume Portion information Equipment information The method Service information Critical control points

6 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Reading Recipes Effectively Read through before starting to cook Pay attention to timing your steps Check advance preparation of ingredients for the day before Might include chilling or marinating or rehydration Assemble and prepare all equipment Allow for resting periods

7 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Changing the Yield Establish the yield you need Multiply number of portions by the size of the individual portion Example: you need 40, 8-oz portions of soup –Multiply 40 × 8 = 320 ounces –Convert to same common unit of measure 1 quart = 32 –320 ounces divided by 32 = 10 quarts

8 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Mise en place After reading, assemble all ingredients Carefully weigh, count, or measure with the correct tools Using scales or counting or measuring into a graded container is the proper method

9 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Converting to a Common Unit 1 gallon is 4 quarts or 128 fluid ounces 1 quart is 2 pints or 32 ounces 1 pint is 2 cups or 16 ounces 1 cup is 16 tablespoons or 8 ounces 1 tablespoon is 3 teaspoons or ½ fluid ounce 1 pound is 16 ounces ¾ pound is 12 ounces ½ pound is 8 ounces ¼ pound is 4 ounces 1 ounce is ½ fluid ounce These are important units to commit to memory

10 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Recipe Conversion Factor (RCF) Desired yield ÷ original yield = RCF Multiply all the ingredients by the RCF to achieve the new amounts for ingredients NOTE: The recipe conversion factor is greater than 1 if you are increasing and less then 1 if you are decreasing

11 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Converting Measurements Convert between volume and weight Convert between count and weight or volume Round measurements into reasonable quantities Convert measurements between U.S. and metric systems

12 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Convert Volume to Weight Set a volume-measuring device on a scale Set the tare weight Fill the measuring device Check and record the weight

13 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Convert from Count to Weight Place a volume-measuring device onto a scale and set the tare weight Place the ingredient into the measuring device and record the count and weight Can be done with most items that are counted: shrimp, eggs, scallops

14 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Converting from Metric to U.S. and Vice Versa Converting ounces and pounds to grams: –Multiply ounces by –Divide pounds by 2.2 to determine kilograms Grams to ounces: divide grams by = ounces Fluid ounce to milliliters: multiply fluid ounces × = milliliters Milliliters to ounces; divide milliliters by = fluid ounces

15 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Determining Food Cost You need accurate information Purchases Current cost from invoices and statements How is food prepared? Cost of each ingredient Amount of each ingredient Add up the cost of all ingredients = total recipe cost

16 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Calculating Yield Percentage Food as you bought it = APQ Food after trimming edible portion quantity = EPQ Answer expressed as a percent Formula = EPQ ÷ APQ = Yield Percentage Multiplying APQ by the yield percentage will give you the weight after trimming When you know the yield percentage, you can calculate back to the APQ using EPQ ÷ Yield Percentage = APQ

17 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Calculating as-Purchased Cost You might need to break units down if you are not using a whole case Tomatoes are $30.00/case, you only need one can (10 cans per case) $30.00 ÷ 10 = $3.00 per can Can weighs 106 ounces; $3.00 ÷ 106 equals.03 cents per ounce Amount called for in the ingredient list × the cost per unit = the total cost of the ingredient(s)


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