Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Young Engineers and Training Working Group Working Group formed in 2010 to consider ways to meet shortfall of engineers identified by members The group.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Young Engineers and Training Working Group Working Group formed in 2010 to consider ways to meet shortfall of engineers identified by members The group."— Presentation transcript:

1 Young Engineers and Training Working Group Working Group formed in 2010 to consider ways to meet shortfall of engineers identified by members The group considers the following Consultation with BBGA members Attracting young people into aircraft engineering Training needs Funding Government bodies Meets every three months Prepared by Group is made up of representatives from membership and wider industry, training providers, CAA, university and public examination board

2 Progress Demographics :- identifying what future staff requirements are Current lack of good data Best working figures are ± 80% mechanics or craft grades to 20% licensed or certifying engineers The figure for licensed engineers is likely to include staff working in management, planning, airworthiness and quality as well as certifying staff Estimate obtained from discussion with members of working group, SEMTA and national statistics Prepared by

3

4 Licensed Engineer Age Profiles Prepared by

5 Current Training Provision for Maintenance Staff Further education courses at level 2 Delivers hand skills and technical certificate covering basic knowledge at college, public funding available Level 2 Apprenticeships Delivers hand skills and technical knowledge at college and in employment, apprentices must be employed, public funding available Level 3 Apprenticeships Higher knowledge content, still can have some craft skills delivery May shortly include qualification allowing application for A licence once competence requirements are met – one qualification only, public funding available Foundation degree/B licence Mainly knowledge content, some hand skills. Funded through higher education funding system/student loans. Some airlines using this as basis for B licence apprenticeships and delivering degree themselves or with a partner college. Prepared by

6 Current Training Provision for Maintenance Staff City and Guilds 2675 qualification mapped to EASA Part 66 A Licence - undergoing Part 66 approval with CAA Distinction in the appropriate units + logbook/evidence of practical experience qualifies candidates for Category A Licence Proportion of those graduating from this course expected to be approximately equivalent to the 80:20 ratio discussed earlier Majority of those graduating from this qualification (pass/credit) will be skilled maintenance/craft staff Training schools holding Part 147 approval will be able to deliver the City and Guilds as part of an apprenticeship and apply for public funding in the same way as any other training establishment or college. This qualification is a stepping stone towards publicly recognised qualifications for aircraft maintenance meeting industry needs Prepared by

7 Future Development Possibilities Differences course between A and B licences leading to level 4 apprenticeships Encourage use of continual professional development logbooks for all disciplines Identify and develop National Occupational Standards for all disciplines Develop qualifications and definitions of competence for all airworthiness disciplines – maintenance, airworthiness, quality, planning, records, etc; Develop Centres of Excellence around the UK for access to good quality training. Identify career development pathways to encourage new entrants and help retention Identify, develop and promote opportunities to encourage young people into industry Information point for industry and young people to raise awareness of training and career opportunities and promote good practice Prepared by

8 Future Development Possibilities Cat A Cat B differences – City and Guilds 2675 A licence needs support from industry to encourage development of B Licence qualification Encourage other examining boards to seek Part 66 Approval Framework for Level 4 apprenticeships (Cat B) approved in principle Prepared by

9 Future Development Possibilities Work with Sector Skills Council and CAA to extend National Occupational Standards for disciplines not yet included Use NOS to work with industry, regulator and examining boards to develop public exams and definitions of competence Identify career development pathways to a)Help industry identify competent staff for recruitment and promotion b)Help industry develop staff to meet company requirements c)Help staff retention d)Encourage recruitment of right people into industry Prepared by

10 Future Development Possibilities Cat A Cat B differences – City and Guilds 2675 A licence needs support from industry to encourage development of B Licence qualification Encourage other examining boards to seek Part 66 Approval Framework for Level 4 apprenticeships (Cat B) approved in principle Prepared by

11 ARC Signatories Subpart G M.A.707(a) outlines requirements for Airworthiness Review Staff issuing ARCs Five years experience in continuing airworthiness (3 years for aircraft 2730 Kg and below, not used for Commercial Air Transport & Balloons) Expansion of this found in Part M subpart C, G and M.A A.30(e) requires competence defined by a procedure and acceptable to the Competent Authority Expansion of this found in AMC 145.A.30 (e) Personnel requirements and Appendix IV to Part 145 in accordance with 145.A.30 (J)1 and 2 Prepared by Competence Definitions in Current Legislation

12 Prepared by Thank You


Download ppt "Young Engineers and Training Working Group Working Group formed in 2010 to consider ways to meet shortfall of engineers identified by members The group."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google