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Resistance Training Thomas R. Baechle, EdD; CSCS,*D; NSCA-CPT,*D Roger W. Earle, MA; CSCS,*D; NSCA-CPT,*D Dan Wathen, MS; ATC; CSCS,*D; NSCA-CPT,*D; FNSCA.

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Presentation on theme: "Resistance Training Thomas R. Baechle, EdD; CSCS,*D; NSCA-CPT,*D Roger W. Earle, MA; CSCS,*D; NSCA-CPT,*D Dan Wathen, MS; ATC; CSCS,*D; NSCA-CPT,*D; FNSCA."— Presentation transcript:

1 Resistance Training Thomas R. Baechle, EdD; CSCS,*D; NSCA-CPT,*D Roger W. Earle, MA; CSCS,*D; NSCA-CPT,*D Dan Wathen, MS; ATC; CSCS,*D; NSCA-CPT,*D; FNSCA chapter 15 Resistance Training

2 Chapter Objectives Evaluate sport requirements and assess an athlete. Select exercises based on type, sport speci- ficity, technique experience, equipment availability, and time availability. Determine training frequency based on training status, sport season, load, exercise type, and other concurrent exercise. Arrange exercises in a training session. (continued)

3 Chapter Objectives (continued) Determine 1-repetition maximum (1RM), predicted 1RM from a multiple RM, and RM loads. Assign load and repetitions based on the training goal. Determine how to increase exercise load. Assign training volumes according to the athletes training status and training goal. Determine rest period lengths based on the training goal.

4 Resistance Training Resistance Training Program Design Variables –Needs analysis –Exercise selection –Training frequency –Exercise order –Training load and repetitions –Volume –Rest periods

5 Section Outline Step 1: Needs Analysis –Evaluation of the Sport –Assessment of the Athlete Training Status Physical Testing and Evaluation Primary Resistance Training Goal

6 Step 1: Needs Analysis Needs analysis is a two-stage process that includes an evaluation of the requirements and characteristics of the sport and an assessment of the athlete.

7 Step 1: Needs Analysis Evaluation of the Sport –movement analysis: Body and limb movement patterns and muscular involvement. –physiological analysis: Strength, power, hypertrophy, and muscular endurance priorities. –injury analysis: Common sites for joint and muscle injury and causative factors.

8 Step 1: Needs Analysis Assessment of the Athlete –Training Status Type of training program Length of recent regular participation in previous training program(s) Level of intensity involved in previous training program(s) Degree of exercise technique experience

9 Table 15.1

10 Step 1: Needs Analysis Assessment of the Athlete –Physical Testing and Evaluation Tests should relate to the athletes sport. Use the results of the movement analysis to select tests. After testing, compare results with normative or descriptive data to determine the athletes strengths and weaknesses. –Primary Resistance Training Goal Typically to improve strength, power, hypertrophy, or muscular endurance. Concentrate on one training outcome per season.

11 Table 15.2

12 Section Outline Step 2: Exercise Selection –Exercise Type Core and Assistance Exercises Structural and Power Exercises –Movement Analysis of the Sport Sport-Specific Exercises Muscle Balance –Exercise Technique Experience –Availability of Resistance Training Equipment –Available Training Time per Session

13 Step 2: Exercise Selection Step 2 involves choosing exercises for a resistance training program.

14 Step 2: Exercise Selection Exercise Type –Core and Assistance Exercises Core exercises recruit one or more large muscle areas, involve two or more primary joints, and receive priority when one is selecting exercises because of their direct application to the sport. Assistance exercises usually recruit smaller muscle areas, involve only one primary joint, and are considered less important to improving sport performance.

15 Step 2: Exercise Selection Exercise Type –Structural and Power Exercises Structural exercises emphasize loading the spine directly or indirectly. Power exercises are structural exercises that are performed very quickly or explosively.

16 Step 2: Exercise Selection Movement Analysis of the Sport –Sport-Specific Exercises The more similar the training activity is to the actual sport movement, the greater the likelihood that there will be a positive transfer to that sport. This concept is called training specificity or the specific adaptation to imposed demands (SAID).

17 Table 15.3

18 Step 2: Exercise Selection Movement Analysis of the Sport –Muscle Balance agonist: The muscle or muscle group actively causing the movement. antagonist: The sometimes passive muscle or muscle group located on the opposite side of the limb.

19 Step 2: Exercise Selection Exercise Technique Experience –Do not assume that an athlete will perform an exercise correctly. –If there is any doubt, have the athlete demonstrate the exercise, and provide instruction as needed. Availability of Resistance Training Equipment Available Training Time per Session –Prioritize time-efficient exercises when time is limited.

20 Section Outline Step 3: Training Frequency –Training Status –Sport Season –Training Load and Exercise Type –Other Training

21 Step 3: Training Frequency Training frequency is the number of training sessions completed in a given time period. For a resistance training program, a common time period is one week.

22 Step 3: Training Frequency Training Status –Training status affects the number of rest days needed between sessions. –Three workouts per week are recommended for many athletes to allow sufficient recovery between sessions.

23 Key Point The general guideline is to schedule train- ing sessions so that there is at least one rest or recovery daybut not more than threebetween sessions that stress the same muscle groups.

24 Table 15.4

25 Key Point More highly resistance-trained (intermediate or advanced) athletes can augment their training by using a split routine in which different muscle groups are trained on different days.

26 Table 15.5

27 Step 3: Training Frequency Sport Season –Seasonal demands of the sport may limit the time available for resistance training.

28 Table 15.6

29 Step 3: Training Frequency Training Load and Exercise Type –Athletes who train with maximal or near-maximal loads require more recovery time prior to their next training session.

30 Step 3: Training Frequency Other Training –Training frequency is influenced by the overall amount of physical stress. –Consider the effects of other aerobic or anaerobic training, sport skill practice, and physically demanding occupations.

31 Section Outline Step 4: Exercise Order –Power, Other Core, Then Assistance Exercises –Upper and Lower Body Exercises (Alternated) –Push and Pull Exercises (Alternated) –Supersets and Compound Sets

32 Step 4: Exercise Order Exercise order is the sequence of resist- ance exercises performed during one training session.

33 Step 4: Exercise Order Power, Other Core, Then Assistance Exercises –Power exercises such as the snatch, hang clean, power clean, and push jerk should be performed first in a training session, followed by other nonpower core exercises and then assistance exercises.

34 Key Term preexhaustion: Reverse exercise arrange- ment where the athlete purposely fatigues a large muscle group as a result of performance of a single-joint exercise prior to a multijoint exercise involving the same muscle.

35 Step 4: Exercise Order Upper and Lower Body Exercises (Alternated) –One method of providing the opportunity for athletes to recover more fully between exercises is to alternate upper body exercises with lower body exercises. –If the exercises are performed with minimal rest periods, this method is also referred to as circuit training.

36 Step 4: Exercise Order Push and Pull Exercises (Alternated) –Another method of improving recovery and recruitment between exercises is to alternate pushing exercises (e.g., bench press, shoulder press, and triceps extension) with pulling exercises (e.g., lat pulldown, bent-over row, biceps curl).

37 Step 4: Exercise Order Supersets and Compound Sets –A superset involves two sequentially performed exercises that stress two opposing muscles or muscle areas (i.e., an agonist and its antagonist). –A compound set involves sequentially performing two different exercises for the same muscle group.

38 Section Outline Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions –Terminology Used to Quantify and Qualify Mechanical Work –Relationship Between Load and Repetitions –1RM and Multiple-RM Testing Options Testing the 1RM Estimating a 1RM –Using a 1RM Table –Using Prediction Equations Multiple-RM Testing Based on Goal Repetitions (continued)

39 Section Outline (continued) Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions –Assigning Load and Repetitions Based on the Training Goal Repetition Maximum Continuum Percentage of the 1RM –How to Calculate a Training Load –Assigning Percentages for Power Training –Variation of the Training Load –Progression of the Training Load Timing Load Increases Quantity of Load Increases

40 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions Terminology Used to Quantify and Qualify Mechanical Work –Mechanical work = force × displacement –Load-volume is a practical measure for the quantity of work performed in resistance training. –Load-volume = weight units × repetitions –Arrangement of repetitions and sets affects the intensity value, a measure of the quality of work performed.

41 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions Relationship Between Load and Repetitions –The heavier the load, the lower the number of repetitions that can be performed. –Load is commonly described as a percentage of a 1-repetition maximum (1RM) or as a repetition maximum (RM).

42 Key Terms load: Most simplistically referred to as the amount of weight assigned to an exercise set; often characterized as the most critical aspect of a resistance training program. 1-repetition maximum (1RM): Greatest amount of weight that can be lifted with proper technique for only one repetition. repetition maximum (RM): Most weight lifted for a specified number of repetitions.

43 Table 15.7

44 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions 1RM and Multiple-RM Testing Options –Testing the 1RM 1RM testing requires adequate training status (intermediate or advanced) and experience with the exercises being tested. Choose core exercises for 1RM testing. Choose exercises that can accurately and consistently assess muscular strength and that allow the athlete to maintain correct body position throughout the testing.

45 Figure 15.1 Reprinted, by permission, from Earle, 2006.

46 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions 1RM and Multiple-RM Testing Options –Estimating a 1RM Using a 1RM Table –To estimate the athletes 1RM, consult table 15.8 (pp in Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning, Third Edition). –In the Max reps (RM) = 10 (%1RM = 75) column, first find the tested 10RM load; then read across the row to the left to discover the athletes projected 1RM.

47 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions 1RM and Multiple-RM Testing Options –Estimating a 1RM Using Prediction Equations –Equations are available to predict the 1RM from multiple-RM loads. –They are most accurate when based on low (10) multiple- RM testing. –Multiple-RM Testing Based on Goal Repetitions A third option for determining training loads requires the strength and conditioning professional to first decide the number of repetitions (i.e., the goal repetitions) the athlete will perform in the actual program for the exercise being tested.

48 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions Assigning Load and Repetitions Based on the Training Goal –Once decided on, the training goal can be applied to determine specific load and repetition assignments via the RM continuum, a percentage of the 1RM, or the results of multiple-RM testing.

49 Assigning Training Loads and Repetitions Figure 15.2 (next slide) –Summary of testing and assigning training loads and repetitions

50 Figure 15.2 Reprinted, by permission, from Earle, 2006.

51 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions Assigning Load and Repetitions Based on the Training Goal –Repetition Maximum Continuum Use relatively heavy loads if the goal is strength or power. Use moderate loads for hypertrophy. Use light loads for muscular endurance. A certain RM emphasizes a certain outcome (indicated by the larger font sizes), but training benefits are blended at any given RM.

52 Repetition Maximum Continuum Figure 15.3 (next slide) –The repetition ranges shown for power in this figure are not consistent with the %1RM–repetition relationship. –On average, loads equaling about 80% of the 1RM apply to the two- to five-repetition range.

53 Figure 15.3

54 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions Assigning Load and Repetitions Based on the Training Goal –Percentage of the 1RM The relationship between the percentage of the 1RM and the estimated number of repetitions that can be performed at that load allows the strength and conditioning profes- sional to assign a specific resistance to be used for an exercise in a training session. The training goal is attained when the athlete lifts a load of a certain percentage of the 1RM for the goal number of repetitions.

55 Table 15.9

56 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions Assigning Load and Repetitions Based on the Training Goal –Percentage of the 1RM How to Calculate a Training Load Assigning Percentages for Power Training –To promote program specificity, particular load and repetition assignments are indicated for athletes training for single-effort power events (e.g., shot put, high jump, weightlifting) and for multiple-effort power events (e.g., basketball, volleyball).

57 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions Variation of the Training Load –Heavy day loads are designed to be full repetition maximums, the greatest resistance that can be successfully lifted for the goal number of repetitions. –The loads for the other training days are reduced (intentionally) to provide recovery after the heavy day while still maintaining sufficient training fre- quency and volume.

58 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions Progression of the Training Load –Timing Load Increases As the athlete adapts to the training stimulus, loads must be increased so that improvements will continue over time. Monitoring each athletes training and response helps the strength and conditioning professional know when and to what extent loads should be increased.

59 Key Term 2-for-2 rule: A conservative method that can be used to increase an athletes training loads; if the athlete can perform two or more repeti- tions over his or her assigned repetition goal in the last set in two consecutive workouts for a given exercise, weight should be added to that exercise for the next training session.

60 Step 5: Training Load and Repetitions Progression of the Training Load –Quantity of Load Increases Table provides general recommendations. Variations in training status, load-volumes, and exercises greatly influence appropriate load increases. Relative load increases of 2.5% to 10% can be used in place of the absolute values in table

61 Table 15.10

62 Section Outline Step 6: Volume –Multiple Versus Single Sets –Training Status –Primary Resistance Training Goal Strength and Power Hypertrophy Muscular Endurance

63 Key Terms volume: The total amount of weight lifted in a training session. set: A group of repetitions sequentially per- formed before the athlete stops to rest. repetition-volume: The total number of repeti- tions performed during a workout session. load-volume: The total number of sets multi- plied by the number of repetitions per set then multiplied by the weight lifted per rep.

64 Step 6: Volume Multiple Versus Single Sets –Single-set training may be appropriate for untrained individuals or during the first several months of training, but many studies indicate that higher volumes are necessary to promote further gains in strength, especially for intermediate and advanced resistance-trained athletes.

65 Step 6: Volume Training Status –It is appropriate for an athlete to perform only one or two sets as a beginner and to add sets as he or she becomes better trained.

66 Step 6: Volume Primary Resistance Training Goal –Training volume is directly based on the resistance training goal. –Table summarizes guidelines for number of repetitions and sets for strength, power, hyper- trophy, and muscular endurance.

67 Table 15.11

68 Step 6: Volume Primary Resistance Training Goal –Strength and Power Volume assignments for power training are typically lower than those for strength training in order to maximize the quality of exercise.

69 Step 6: Volume Primary Resistance Training Goal –Hypertrophy Increases in muscular size are associated with higher training volumes and performing three or more exercises per muscle group. –Muscular Endurance Programs for muscular endurance involve many repetitions (12 or more) per set, lighter loads, and fewer sets.

70 Section Outline Step 7: Rest Periods –Strength and Power –Hypertrophy –Muscular Endurance

71 Step 7: Rest Periods The time dedicated to recovery between sets and exercises is called the rest period or interset rest. The length of the rest period between sets and exercises is highly dependent on the goal of training, the relative load lifted, and the athletes training status.

72 Table 15.12

73 Step 7: Rest Periods Strength and Power –Maximal or near-maximal loads require longer rest periods. –Guidelines range from 2 to 5 minutes. Hypertrophy –Short to moderate rest periods are required. –Typical strategies range from 30 seconds to 1.5 minutes. Muscular Endurance –Very short rest periods of 30 seconds or less are required.


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