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Alternative Work Schedules: Training for Supervisors.

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Presentation on theme: "Alternative Work Schedules: Training for Supervisors."— Presentation transcript:

1 Alternative Work Schedules: Training for Supervisors

2 ©SHRM Introduction The traditional work schedule of Monday through Friday is rapidly disappearing. We live in a global society; companies have customers around the world, resulting in the need for varied or expanded hours of operation. Technology and the shift to a service-oriented economy have redefined the nature of work. With dual-career and single-parent households, employees must balance the challenges of their jobs with the demands of their lives; the nature of work has dramatically changed for many employees. Employers and employees are not only seeking but demanding alternative work schedules. This sample presentation is intended for presentation to supervisors and other individuals who manage employees. It is designed to be presented by an individual who is knowledgeable in alternative work schedules and the companys policies and practices. This is a sample presentation that must be customized to match the employers own policy, practices, and culture.

3 ©SHRM 2008 Objectives At the close of this session, you will be able to: State what an alternative work schedule is. Cite advantages and explain how alternative schedules meet the needs of employers, employees and communities. Cite potential disadvantages. List various types of schedules. Describe our policy for alternative work schedules. 3

4 ©SHRM 2008 What is an Alternative Work Schedule? Alternative work schedules are alternatives to the traditional 9- to-5, 40-hour workweeks where work is performed on-site. They allow employees to vary their arrival and/or departure times or to work a specified number of hours a pay period and be present during a daily "core time." Alternative work arrangements such as flexible work schedules or compressed workweeks are a matter of agreement between the employer and the employee.

5 ©SHRM 2008 Alternative Work Schedules Meet Needs of Employers Alternative work schedules meet the needs of employers by: Having more dedicated employees who are able to maximize their productive time and minimize the effects of outside responsibilities. Meeting changing and expanding customer expectations and demands, particularly for service and global companies whose customers may be in other time zones or have nontraditional work schedules themselves. Making better use of facilities and equipment by reducing idle time.

6 ©SHRM 2008 Alternative Work Schedules Meet Needs of Employees Alternative work schedules meet the needs of employees by: Allowing them to have a schedule which helps them balance work and life responsibilities, such as caring for young children when both parents are working. being able to see children off to school. caring for an aged parent. having non-weekend time to accomplish errands and other personal business. scheduling leisure time more easily. 6

7 ©SHRM 2008 Alternative Work Schedules Meet the Needs of Communities Alternative work schedules meet the needs of communities by: Reducing traffic congestion with workers on flexible daily schedules, instead of all arriving and leaving work at or near the same time. Reducing air pollution and energy demand when employees work a compressed workweek or telecommute. 7

8 ©SHRM 2008 Disadvantages of Alternative Work Schedules Alternative work schedules can present the following challenges: Maintaining ongoing and strong communications with employees on schedules that may vary from their supervisors and who may work off-site all or most of the time. Managing employee relations issues, such as monitoring work and evaluating performance. Handling resentment by employees who are not eligible for or do not participate in the alternative work schedule program. 8

9 ©SHRM 2008 Questions? Comments? 9

10 ©SHRM 2008 Types of Alternative Work Schedules Alternative work schedules include: Temporary work – Short-term work provided to employees or temporary agency workers to fill in for a regular employee who is on leave or to meet special project or staffing needs. Part-time work – Less than full-time work (generally less than 40 hours per week) provided to meet individual employee needs or the employers staffing or financial needs, and often having a lower level of benefits than full-time work. Job sharing – Allowing two part-time employees to do the work of one full-time employee by sharing responsibilities, the work schedule and usually the office location.

11 ©SHRM 2008 Types of Alternative Work Schedules (contd) Hoteling – A method of supporting unassigned seating in an office environment. It is similar to and sometimes confused with hot desking, another method of supporting unassigned seating. Hoteling is reservation-based unassigned seating, whereas hot desking is unassigned seating without a reservation. Flextime – This means that employees are allowed some flexibility in their daily work schedules. For example, rather than all employees working 8:00 to 4:30, some might work 7:30 to 4:00, and others 9:00 to 5:30. 11

12 ©SHRM 2008 Types of Alternative Work Schedules (contd) V-Time – A variation of flextime which allows employees to voluntarily take a part of the year off or change to part-time status to meet personal needs with the understanding that the employee will return to full-time work as specified. An example is an employee taking the summer off or changing to part-time in the summer. Compressed workweek – This means that employees work fewer but longer days, such as four 10-hour days each week (4/40), or 9-hour days with one day off every two weeks (9/80). Telecommuting – An arrangement by which employees spend all or part of the workweek working outside of the office, such as in their home or in a satellite location. 12

13 ©SHRM 2008 Questions? Comments? 13

14 ©SHRM 2008 Alternative Work Schedule Policy at [Name of Company] Note to Presenter: Customize for your companys policy. 14

15 ©SHRM 2008 Questions? Comments? 15

16 ©SHRM Summary Alternative work schedules are alternatives to the traditional 9-to-5, 40-hour workweeks where work is primarily performed on-site. Alternative work schedules meet the needs of employers, employees and their communities by improving productivity, creating a better work/life balance and helping to curb peak rush- hour traffic congestion and air pollution. These schedules present challenges for maintaining good communication, monitoring and evaluating work, and handling resentment by employees who are not eligible for an alternative work schedule. Types of alternative schedules include part-time work, job sharing, V-Time, flextime, compressed workweeks, and telecommuting.

17 ©SHRM Course Evaluation Please be sure to complete and leave the evaluation sheet you received with your handouts. Thank you for your attention and interest!


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