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OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 1 Copyright ©

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Presentation on theme: "OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 1 Copyright ©"— Presentation transcript:

1 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 1 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada OB on the Edge Stress at Work

2 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 2 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada How Stressed Are We? Stress Across the Country, 2001 -2002 Region % with no life stress % with quite a lot of stress Alberta 9.8 26.0 Atlantic Canada 14.6 18.7 British Columbia 12.0 23.6 Ontario 10.7 25.7 The Prairies 8.7 24.5 Quebec 18.0 30.0 Source: Compiled using data from Statistics Canada, "Life Stress, by Sex, Household Population Aged 18 and Over, Canada, Provinces, Territories, Health Regions and Peer Groups, 2000/01."

3 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 3 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada The Most Stressful Jobs RankStressScore 1.US President176.6 2. Firefighter110.9 3. Senior Executive108.6 6. Surgeon99.5 10.Air Traffic Controller83.1 12.Public Relations Executive78.5 16.Advertising Account Executive74.6 17.Real Estate 73.1 20. Stockbroker71.7 22. Pilot68.7 25. Architect66.9 31. Lawyer64.3 33. General Physician64.0 35. Insurance Agent63.3 42. Advertising Salesperson59.9 RankStressScore 47.Auto Salesperson 56.3 50. College Professor54.2 60. School Principal51.7 103.Market Research Analyst42.1 104. Personnel Recruiter41.8 113. Hospital Administrator39.6 119. Economist38.7 122.Mechanical Engineer38.3 124.Chiropractor37.9 132. Technical Writer36.5 149.Retail Salesperson34.9 173.Accountant31.1 193. Purchasing Agent28.9 229. Broadcast Technician24.2 245.Actuary20.2 Source: Reprinted by permission of the Wall Street Journal, © 1996 Dow Jones & Company. All rights reserved worldwide.

4 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 4 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada What Is Stress? A situation that creates excessive psychological or physiological demands on a person.

5 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 5 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada General Adaptation Syndrome Alarm –Body tries to meet initial challenge of stressor. Increased respiration, raised blood pressure, dilated pupils, tensed muscles Resistance –Fatigue, anxiety, and tension Exhaustion –Prolonged and continual exposure to stressor.

6 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 6 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada Effects of Stress Not necessarily bad –Athletes or stage performers can use stress to perform close to peak level. But –Students putting off studying until the last minute and then developing the flu does not result in peak performance.

7 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 7 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada Causes of Stress Changes in the workplace: –Competition and change –Technological change –Increasingly diverse workforce –Downsizing –Employee empowerment and teamwork –Work/home conflict

8 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 8 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada Consequences of Stress Physiological symptoms –e.g., increased blood pressure, headaches, heart attacks Psychological symptoms –e.g., job dissatisfaction, tension, anxiety, irritability, boredom, procrastination Behavioural symptoms –Changes in productivity, absence, turnover, eating habits, smoking, drinking, etc.

9 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 9 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada Why Do Individuals Differ in Their Experience of Stress Perception Job experience Social support Belief in locus of control Hostility

10 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 10 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada How Do We Manage Stress? Individual Approaches Time management Physical activity Relaxation techniques Building social support

11 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 11 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada How Do We Manage Stress: Organizational Approaches Selection and placement decisions Goal setting Redesigning jobs Increasing employee involvement Increasing organizational communication Providing organizational wellness programs

12 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 12 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada FactBox One in three Canadians between the ages of 25 and 44 claims to be a workaholic. 38% of people in management report being workaholics. 85% of married women who are employed full-time and have at least one child at home, and 75% of similarly situated men, say that weekdays are too short to accomplish what needs to get done. The financial cost to companies because employees are trying to balance work and family obligations is estimated to be at least $2.7 billion a year.

13 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 13 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada FactBox 1/3 of Canadians dont take all of their vacation days, saving their employers $8 billion a year. When Canadians to go on holiday, 36% of them take work, and check their office voicemail and email.

14 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 14 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada Tips for Reducing Stress At least two or three times a week, spend time with supportive friends or family. Ask for support when you are under pressure. This is a sign of health, not weakness. If you have spiritual or religious beliefs, increase or maintain your involvement. Use a variety of methods to reduce stress. Consider exercise, nutrition, hobbies, positive thinking, and relaxation techniques such as meditation or yoga. Source: J. Lee, How to Fight That Debilitating Stress in Your Workplace, The Vancouver Sun, April 5, 1999, p. C3. Reprinted with permission.

15 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 15 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada Reducing Stress in the Workplace Avoid electronic monitoring of staff. Personal supervision generates considerably less stress. Allow workers time to recharge after periods of intense or demanding work. Deliver important information that significantly affects employees face to face. Encourage positive social interactions between staff to promote problem solving around work issues and increase emotional support. Keep in mind that staff need to balance privacy and social interaction at work. Extremes can generate stress. Source: J. Lee, How to Fight That Debilitating Stress in Your Workplace, The Vancouver Sun, April 5, 1999, p. C3. Reprinted with permission.

16 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 16 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada FaceOff When organizations provide on-site daycare facilities, they are filling a needed role in parents lives, and making it easier for parents to attend to their job demands rather than worry about child-care arrangements. When employees expect organizations to provide child care, they are shifting their responsibilities to their employers, rather than keeping their family needs and concerns private. Moreover, its unfair to give child-care benefits when not all employees have children.

17 OB on the Edge: Stress, Nancy Langton and Stephen P. Robbins, Fundamentals of Organizational Behaviour, Third Canadian Edition OB Stress 17 Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education Canada Your Perspective 1.Think of all of the technological changes that have happened in the workplace in recent years, including email, BlackBerrys, and intranets. What are the positive benefits of all this change? What are the downsides? As an employee facing the demand to stay connected to your workplace, how would you try to maintain a balance in your life? 2.How much responsibility should individuals take for managing their own stress? To what extent should organizations become involved in the personal lives of their employees when trying to help them manage stress? What are the pros and cons for whether employees or organizations take responsibility for managing stress?


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