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The REA Data Model Resources Events Agents Based on:

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1 The REA Data Model Resources Events Agents Based on:
©2003 Prentice Hall Business Publishing, Accounting Information Systems, 9/e, Romney/Steinbart

2 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 The REA Data Model The REA data model is a conceptual modeling tool specifically designed to provide structure for designing AIS data bases. Dr. Fred Barbee

3 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 The REA Data Model The REA data model provides structure in two ways: By identifying what entities should be included in the AIS database By prescribing how to structure relationships among the entities in the AIS database Dr. Fred Barbee

4 Business Activities Business transactions are exchanges.
Who “gets” what and who “gives” what in return are separate transactions. The exchange occurs between the business entity and usually an outside agent. The business gives something and then gets something in return.

5 Resources, Events, and Agents
Every business transaction is made up of three components: Resources are the things of economic value exchanged. Events are the actual giving and getting of the resources. Agents are the people who actually make the exchange.

6 Steps and Documents in the Acquisition/Payment Process
(as used in the SUA)

7 Steps and Documents in the Sales/Collection Process
(as used in the SUA)

8 The Accounting Equation
Assets = Claims Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity Asset: economic resources owned by the business. Liability: obligations of the business to creditors. Equity: owner’s claims to the assets.

9 Four Basic Financial Statements
Balance Sheet Assets = Liabilities + Equity Income Statement Revenues - Expenses = Net income Statement of Retained Earnings Beginning RE + Net income - Dividends = Ending RE Cash Flow Statement Cash inflow - Cash outflow = Net cash flow

10 Traditional Approaches: User-View Orientation
When data-modeling and IS design is too oriented toward the user’s views, problems arise: multiple information systems duplication of data restricted user-view leads to poor decision-making inability to support change

11 Traditional Approaches: Financial Accounting Orientation
Dominance of traditional accounting as the primary information provider leads to problems: single view of business entity using the accounting/balance sheet model: double-entry, debits and credits high level of aggregation ignoring non-financial data inability to serve diverse enterprise-wide needs Assets = Liabilities + Owners’ Equity

12 The REA Approach to Business Modeling
31

13 Resources, Events, and Agents (REA) Model
Developed in the ‘70's by Dr. Bill McCarthy of Michigan State University The definition of events is broad enough to encompass both operational and accounting transactions. Expands the scope and usefulness of AIS by making it capable of providing both financial and nonfinancial information. Data for each event is stored in disaggregated form. Outputs are subsequently produced by assembling the required data from the various records. Many firms have not adopted the REA model since it is a major change from the traditional double-entry approach. The REA or events perspective is increasingly seen as necessary to meet changing information needs.

14 Resources, Events, and Agents (REA) Model …
An approach to database design meant to overcome problems with traditional approaches: formalized data modeling and design of IS use of centralized database use of relational database structure collects detailed financial and non-financial data supports accounting and non-accounting analysis supports multiple user views supports enterprise-wide planning

15 Resources, Events, and Agents (REA) Model …
The REA model is an alternative accounting framework for modeling an organization’s economic resources economic events economic agents, and their interrelationships A variation of entity-relationship diagramming (ERD) is used to model these relationships. 42

16 Resources in the REA Model
Economic resources are the assets of the company. able to generate revenue objects that are scarce and under the control of the organization can be tangible or intangible Does not include some traditional accounting assets: for example, Accounts Receivables artifacts that can be generated from other primary data 42

17 Events in the REA Model Economic events are phenomena that effect changes in resources. a source of detailed data in the REA approach to databases Three classes of events: operating events--what happens information events--what is recorded decision/management events--what is done as a result Only operating events are included in the REA model. 42

18 Agents in the REA Model Can be individuals or departments
Can participate in events Can affect resources have discretionary power to use or dispose of resources Can be inside or outside the organization clerks production workers customers suppliers, vendors departments, teams 42

19 Resources, Events, and Agents (REA) Model …
A variation of the entity-relationship diagramming (ERD) is used in REA modeling. Basic ERD symbols: entity attribute (optional) relationship (optional) 42

20 Advantages of the REA Model
Using REA can lead to more efficient operations helps managers identify non-value added activities that can be eliminated increased productivity via elimination of non-value added activities generates excess capacity storing both financial and nonfinancial data in the same central database reduces multiple data collection, data storage, and maintenance detailed financial and nonfinancial business data supports a wider range of management decisions increased competitive advantage by providing more relevant, timely, and accurate information to managers 43

21 Value Chain Analysis Competitive advantages from the REA approach can be see via value chain analysis. Value chain analysis distinguishes between primary activities (create value) and support activities (assist performing primary activities). REA provides a model for identifying and differentiating between these activities. Prioritizing Strategy: Focus on primary activities; eliminate or outsource support activities. 43

22 Database Applications
Phase 1 Flat Files Phase 2 Event-Driven Database Phase 3 REA-Model Database Limitations: Not widely used; Requires detailed analysis Limitations: Redundant data; Anomalies Limitations: Loss of non-economic information

23 Database Sales Order Entry/Cash Receipts System

24 Database Purchases/Cash Disbursement System

25 Limitations of Transaction-Based Systems
Event: a single business activity within a business process which involves resources and agents Traditional event-based database systems tend to focus exclusively on economic events. loss of non-economic/non-financial information REA is event-oriented versus event-based. includes non-economic and economic event information

26 Developing an REA Model: Overview
Before developing the REA model, identify events and classify as: Operating events--activities that produce goods and services Information events--activities associated with recording, maintaining, and reporting information Decision/Management events--activities that lead to decisions being taken REA model uses only operating events.

27 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Basic REA template Dr. Fred Barbee

28 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 The REA Data Model Give-To- Get Duality Resources Events Agents Dr. Fred Barbee

29 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 The REA Data Model Resources: Those things that have economic value to the firm. Resources Events Agents Dr. Fred Barbee

30 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 The REA Data Model Events: Various Business Activities Resources Events Agents Dr. Fred Barbee

31 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 The REA Data Model Agents: People and Organizations that participate in events. Resources Events Agents Dr. Fred Barbee

32 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design Developing an REA Diagram
3/31/2017 Developing an REA Diagram Dr. Fred Barbee

33 Step 1: Identify the Economic Exchange Events
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Step 1: Identify the Economic Exchange Events 1 Identify the pair of events that reflect the basic economic exchange (give-to-get duality relationship) in that cycle. Dr. Fred Barbee

34 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
Identify the PAIR of events One GET One GIVE 3/31/2017 Dr. Fred Barbee

35 Step 2: Identify Resources and Agents
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Step 2: Identify Resources and Agents 2 Identify the Resources affected by each event and the agents who participate in those events. Dr. Fred Barbee

36 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Identify . . . RESOURCES affected by each event. AGENTS who participate in the events. Dr. Fred Barbee

37 Step 3: Include commitment Events
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Step 3: Include commitment Events 3 Analyze each economic exchange event to determine whether it should be decomposed into a combination of one or more commitment events and an economic exchange event. Dr. Fred Barbee

38 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Include commitment events. Dr. Fred Barbee

39 Step 4: Determine Cardinalities of Relationships
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Step 4: Determine Cardinalities of Relationships 4 Determine the cardinalities of each relationship. Dr. Fred Barbee

40 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Determine cardinalities of relationships. Dr. Fred Barbee

41 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 How many sales transactions can be linked to each individual customer? Sales Customer How many customers can be linked to each individual sales transaction? Dr. Fred Barbee

42 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Cardinalities Minimum (1,N) Maximum Dr. Fred Barbee

43 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 The first number is the minimum cardinality. It indicates whether a row in this table must be linked to at least one row in the table on the opposite side of that relationship. Dr. Fred Barbee

44 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Minimum Cardinality The minimum cardinality of a relationship indicates whether each row in that entity MUST be linked to a row in the entity on the other side of the relationship. Minimum cardinalities can be either 0 or 1. Dr. Fred Barbee

45 Minimum Cardinalities
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Minimum Cardinalities A minimum cardinality of zero means that a new row can be added to that table without being linked to any rows in the other table. A minimum cardinality of one means that each row in that table MUST be linked to at least one row in the other table Dr. Fred Barbee

46 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Cardinalities The minimum cardinality of zero in the (0, N) cardinality pair to the left of the customer entity in the customer-sales relationship . . . Made to Sales (0, N) Customer . . . indicates that a new customer may be added to the database without being linked to any sales events. Dr. Fred Barbee

47 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Cardinalities The minimum cardinality of 1 in the (1,1) cardinality pair to the right of the sales entity in the customer-sales relationship . . . Made to Sales (1,1) (0, N) Customer . . . indicates that a new sales transaction CAN ONLY be added if it is linked to a customer. Dr. Fred Barbee

48 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 The second number is the maximum cardinality. It indicates whether one row in that table can be linked to more than one row in the other table. Dr. Fred Barbee

49 Maximum Cardinalities
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Maximum Cardinalities The maximum cardinality of a relationship indicates whether each row in that entity CAN be linked to more than one row in the entity on the other side of the relationship. Maximum cardinalities can be either 1 or N. Dr. Fred Barbee

50 Maximum Cardinalities
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Maximum Cardinalities A maximum cardinality of 1 means that each row in that table can be linked to at most only 1 row in the other table. A maximum cardinality of N means that each row in that table MAY be linked to more than one row in the other table. Dr. Fred Barbee

51 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Cardinalities The maximum cardinality of N in the (0,N) cardinality pair to the left of the customer entity in the customer-sales relationship . . . Made to Sales (0, N) Customer . . . indicates that a given customer MAY be linked to many sales events. Dr. Fred Barbee

52 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Cardinalities The maximum cardinality of 1 in the (1,1) cardinality pair to the right of the sales entity in the customer-sales relationship . . . Made to Sales (1,1) (0, N) Customer . . . indicates that a given sales transaction can only be linked to one customer. Dr. Fred Barbee

53 Determine Cardinalities
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Determine Cardinalities Cardinalities are not arbitrarily chosen by the database designer. They reflect facts about the organization being modeled and its business practices obtained during the requirements analysis stage of the database design process. Dr. Fred Barbee

54 Cardinalities: Types of Relationships
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Cardinalities: Types of Relationships Three basic types - depending on the maximum cardinality associated with each entity. A one-to-one relationship (1:1) A one-to-many relationship (1:N) A many-to-many relationship (M:N) Dr. Fred Barbee

55 Types of Relationships
Panel A: One-to-One (1:1) Relationship Sales Cash Receipts (0,1) (1,1)

56 Types of Relationships
Panel B: One-to-Many (1:N) Relationship Sales Cash Receipts (0,N) (1,1)

57 Types of Relationships
Panel C: One-to-Many (1:N) Relationship Sales Cash Receipts (0,1) (1,N)

58 Types of Relationships
Panel D: Many-to-Many (M:N) Relationship Sales Cash Receipts (0,N) (1,N)

59 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Build a Set of Tables to Implement an REA Model of an AIS in a Relational Database Dr. Fred Barbee

60 Implementing an REA Diagram in a Relational Database
Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design 3/31/2017 Implementing an REA Diagram in a Relational Database An REA diagram can be used to design a well-structured relational database. A well-structured relational database is one that is not subject to update, insert, and delete anomaly problems. Dr. Fred Barbee

61 Three Step Process Create a table for each distinct entity and for each many-to many relationship Assign attributes to appropriate tables Use foreign keys to implement one-to-one and one-to-many relationships

62 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Implementing an REA Diagram Dr. Fred Barbee

63 Implementing an REA model

64 Create Tables From the previously discussed REA diagram, nine tables would be created: one for each of the seven entities and one for each of the many-to-many relationships. Inventory Purchases Employees Vendors Cashier Cash disbursements Cash Purchases-inventory Purchases-cash disbursements

65 Assign Attributes for Each Table
Primary keys: Usually, the primary key of a table representing an entity is a single attribute. Other Attributes: Additional attributes are included in each table to satisfy transaction processing requirements.

66 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Implementing an REA Diagram Dr. Fred Barbee

67 Chapter 5: Data Modeling and Database Design
3/31/2017 Implementing an REA Diagram Dr. Fred Barbee

68 Documentation of Business Practices
REA diagrams are especially useful for documenting an advanced AIS built using databases. REA diagrams provide information about the organization’s business practices

69 Documentation of Business Practices
The zero minimum for the sales event indicates that credit sales are made The N maximum for the sales event means that customers may make installment payments Sales- Cash Receipts Cash Receipts Sales (1, N) (0, N)

70 Documentation of Business Practices
The one minimum for the cash receipts event indicates that cash is not received prior to delivering the merchandise The N maximum for the cash receipts event means that customers may pay for several sales with one check Sales- Cash Receipts Cash Receipts Sales (1, N) (0, N)

71 Extracting Information From the AIS
A complete REA diagram serves as a useful guide for querying an AIS database. Queries can be used to generate journals and ledgers from a relational database built on the REA model.

72 Extracting Information From the AIS
(0, 1) (1, N) Sales Cash collections Each sales transaction is paid in full by a cash collection event. Each customer payment may be for more than one sale. What is the query logic? Total accounts receivable is the sum of all sales for which there is no remittance number.

73 Extracting Information From the AIS
(1, 1) Sales Cash collections Each sales transaction can be paid in installments. Each customer payment is for just one sale. What is the query logic? (1) sum all sales; (2) sum cash collections; then A/R = (1)-(2)

74 Extracting Information From the AIS
(0, 1) (1, 1) Sales Cash collections Each sales transaction is paid in full by a cash collection event. Each customer payment is for one sale. What is the query logic? Total accounts receivable is the sum of all sales for which there is no remittance number.

75 Extracting Information From the AIS
Sales Cash collections Each sales transaction may be paid for in installments. Each customer payment may be for more than one sale. What is the query logic? (1) Sum all sales; (2) Sum all cash collections; Then A/R = (1)-(2)

76 Let’s Review with a Little Help From My Friends ….

77 An REA Model of an Economic Exchange
William E. McCarthy* Michigan State University (These slides may be copied as long as original source is cited) *http://www.msu.edu/user/mccarth4/

78 Cookie-Monster (the customer) and Elmo (the entrepreneur) meet in the (real or virtual) marketplace, thus setting the stage for an Economic Exchange

79 Economic Exchange Pattern
Event Agent Resource duality R E A Source: W. E. McCarthy “The REA Accounting Model: A Generalized Framework for Accounting Systems in a Shared Data Environment,” The Accounting Review, July 1982, pp W.E. McCarthy “The REA Modeling Approach to Teaching Accounting Information Systems,” Issues in Accounting Education, November 2003, pp (source of following slides)

80 Cookie-Monster (the customer) and Elmo (the entrepreneur) engage in a SHIPMENT (transfer of Cookie Inventory)

81 outside participation outside participation
Economic Resource COOKIES inside participation Economic Agent ELMO stock-flow Economic Event SALE Economic Agent outside participation cookie monster Give duality Take outside participation Economic Agent stock-flow Economic Event Economic Agent inside participation Economic Resource REA model of cookie sale from entrepreneur’s (ELMO) perspective

82 Cookie-Monster (the customer) and Elmo (the entrepreneur) engage in a PAYMENT (transfer of Cash)

83 outside participation outside participation
Economic Resource COOKIES inside participation Economic Agent ELMO stock-flow Economic Event SALE Economic Agent outside participation cookie monster Give duality Take outside participation Economic Agent cookie monster stock-flow Economic Event CASH RECEIPT Economic Agent inside participation Economic Resource ELMO CASH REA model of cookie sale from entrepreneur’s (ELMO) perspective

84 outside participation
Give Take Economic Resource inside participation outside participation stock-flow Economic Event Cash Receipt Economic Agent Salesperson Customer Cashier Cash Cookies duality Sale more general exchange model from the entrepreneur’s (ELMO’s) internal perspective

85 COOKIES-stockflow-SALE
Product# Description Price QOH P-1 Chocolate Chip 1.05 200 P-2 Chocolate .95 205 P-3 Peanut Butter 1.00 97 P-4 Pecan 1.10 257 Product# Invoice# Quantity P-2 I-1 5 P-3 10 I-2 20 P-4 I-3 9 P-1 I-4 4 SALE-duality-CASH_RECEIPT SALE Invoice# Dollar Amount Date Salesperson Employee# Customer # I-1 14.75 1JUL E-1234 C-987 I-2 20.00 2JUL E-1235 C-888 I-3 9.90 3JUL E-1236 C-999 I-4 9.20 5JUL E-1237 Invoice# Receipt Timestamp Amount Applied I-1 2JUL0830 14.75 I-2 3JUL0800 2.00 5JUL0800 18.00 I-3 8JUL1145 9.90 I-4 9.20 Partial Database for Elmo’s Cookie Business Why is this invoice amount $14.75 ?? How is customer paying for this ???

86 A business process is a set of activities that takes one or more kinds of input and creates an output that is of greater value to the customer (Hammer and Champy) business process labor cookies Conversion Cycle business process Revenue Cycle cash business process cookie ingredients Acquisition Cycle cash value chain A value chain is a purposeful network of business processes aimed at assembling the individual components of a final product (i.e., its portfolio of attributes) of value to the customer (Porter and Geerts/McCarthy) Part of ELMO’s Value Chain for Providing Cookies

87 Enterprise Information Basic Systems Counting Accounting
Semantic infrastructure of system matches extended REA pattern Enterprise Information Systems Basic Accounting Systems Counting artifacts e-collaboration systems Enterprise Systems classification structure is from David, McCarthy & Sommer, Communications of the ACM, May 2003, pp

88 Different perspectives on REA modeling needed for enterprise modeling (value chains) and collaboration space (supply chains) Enterprise modeling (as evidenced in normal ERP systems) is done from the perspective of one company or entrepreneur. Business processes are viewed as components of a single value chain. A single exchange (like the sale of a product for money) would be modeled twice, once in the enterprise system of each trading partner. Collaboration space modeling (as evidenced in ebXML or ISO Open-edi) is done from a perspective independent of each trading partner. A single exchange is modeled once in independent terms that can be then mapped into internal enterprise system components. Supply chains are networks of business processes that alternate internal transformations and external exchanges (definition due to Bob Haugen). REA modeling works in both cases and the independent to trading partner mapping is absolutely straightforward and completely defined.

89 Used for collaboration space modeling
Business Process Independent view of Inter-enterprise events Enterprise Illustration of Perspective: Trading Partner vs. Independent Trading Partner view of Inter-enterprise events (upstream vendors and downstream customers) Blue arrows represent flow of goods, services, and cash between different companies; green arrows represent flows within companies Used for collaboration space modeling SOURCE: Adapted from ISO , K. Morita

90 COOKIES ELMO SHIPMENT ELMO CASH cookie monster cookie monster
Economic Resource Economic Agent COOKIES from ELMO stock-flow Economic Event SHIPMENT Economic Agent to cookie monster initiating transfer duality responding transfer Economic Agent to ELMO stock-flow Economic Event PAYMENT Economic Agent from Economic Resource cookie monster CASH REA model of cookie sale from independent (collaboration space) perspective

91 Ontological Extensions to the REA Model (Geerts and McCarthy)
Type images for basic objects allows specification of policies and controls plus abstract specification of negotiation components Commitment images for economic events allows specification of contracts and agreements State machine model allows specification and ordering of business events as collaboration space messaging and/or internal workflow Aggregation of binary collaborations allows mediated collaboration with third parties SOURCE: Geerts and McCarthy, The Ontological Foundations of REA Enterprise Information Systems, 2003.

92 Bilateral Collaboration Economic Resource Type Mediated Collaboration
ISO Open-edi Ontology Collaboration Model Bilateral Collaboration governs Economic Event Economic Resource Economic Agent stockflow from to Economic Contract Economic Commitment reciprocal fulfills establish duality Economic Resource Type typifies specifies Economic Event Type Business Role qualifies reserves involves Partner Third Party Mediated Collaboration Business Transaction participates requires Agreement Regulator constrains SOURCE: Adapted from ISO , W.E. McCarthy

93 Cookie-Monster and Elmo after their economic exchange (both economic agents have now reached higher levels of utility)

94 Cookie Monster and Elmo are of course characters from the Public Broadcasting Service TV show Sesame Street*. Their use here is only illustrative. Cookie Monster is a great example of a typical buyer (has money, wants goods) because he is most happy when he has a cookie to eat. The use of Elmo as a typical seller (has goods, wants money) is only a convenient illustration. * see

95 Online resources: AIS Romney 2006 notes Chapter15 Database Design Using the REA AIS Romney 2006 notes Chapter 16 Implementing an REA


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