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1 Summary Report December 2008 © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: 181283 Taking Part 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Summary Report December 2008 © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: 181283 Taking Part 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Summary Report December 2008 © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: Taking Part 2008

2 2 How to view this report – slide show options Please select the version of the slide show that you would like to view by clicking on the appropriate box. To return to this page at any time click on the Scottish Arts Council logo at the top right of the screen. Under-represented group summaries: Residents of deprived areas People with disabilities Women Summary top line results Residents of rural areas People aged 65 or over People aged 16 to 24 Minority ethnic communities Regional summaries: Edinburgh and surrounds East and Central Scotland Highlands & Islands North East Scotland Glasgow and surrounds South West Scotland South of Scotland Art form profiles Full results including background Appendix – definitions and method Attitudes and segmentation analysis

3 3 Background The Scottish Arts Council is the leading organisation involved in supporting and developing the arts in Scotland. TNS were commissioned to provide up to date information on levels of attendance and participation in arts related activities in Scotland. The study follows previous surveys carried out in 2004 and This study provides a further survey wave to give more insight into attendance and participation trends.

4 4 Research objectives The specific objectives of the 2008 study were as follows: To collect data that is robust enough to allow reporting against the baseline data for each target, to allow for identification of any statistically significant change in the overall level of attendance and participation among the adult (aged 16+) population in Scotland. To collect robust data amongst each of the following under-represented groups based on aggregation of attendance and participation levels at art events and activities; minority ethnic communities disabled people people aged people aged 65+ people living in deprived areas people living in rural areas women To ensure that all the data will allow any statistical variations in attendance and participation to be identified. To explore and examine as far as possible, any variations/trends/issues from the 2004/2006/2008 data from the perspective of the population of Scotland as a whole, for a number of key under-represented groups as well as any regional/ local differences.

5 5 Survey method 4,941 face to face in-home interviews undertaken throughout Scotland. Fieldwork took place between March and June Of this total, 2,110 represented the core sample, representative of the Scottish population in terms of geographical distribution, age, working status, ethnicity and socio-economic grade. Additional booster sampling was undertaken amongst minority groups. These booster interviews were combined with the core interviews to allow separate analysis by under represented group. Booster interviews were also undertaken in certain geographic areas of Scotland to allow for analysis by regional area. If possible, comparisons have been made with the 2004 and 2006 Taking Part results. If no data is included for a particular year, this indicates a year where no comparable question was asked.

6 6 Attendance and participation – Scottish adult population © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number:

7 7 Attendance within the last 12 months By art form categories Base: 2004 (2,020), 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110) In 2008 there was a statistically significant increase in attendance at music and visual arts events but a decrease in attendance at dance events. Around three-quarters of Scottish adults attended one or more arts event (77%), similar to the proportions recorded in 2006 and 2004.

8 8 Attendance within last 12 months All activities The 2008 survey recorded increased attendance at rock/pop events and art galleries. Base: 2004 (2,020), 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110)

9 9 Participation within last 12 months By art form categories Overall participation levels decreased by 5 percentage points since 2006 but remained above the 2004 levels. The 2008 survey recorded a decrease in the proportion of Scottish adults reading and buying books but no significant changes in other categories Base: 2004 (2,020), 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110)

10 10 Participation within last 12 months All activities Base: 2004 (2,020), 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110) Since 2006, decreases in the proportions reading books, buying non-fiction, undertaking knitting/other textile crafts and buying works of art or crafts.

11 11 Attendance and participation – Under represented groups © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number:

12 12 Summary Combined attendance and participation by group Between 2006 and 2008, no statistically significant increases or decreases, overall, or amongst any of the under represented groups.

13 13 Summary Attendance by group Between 2006 and 2008, a decrease in attendance amongst ethnic minority communities. No other significant changes.

14 14 Summary Participation by group Between 2006 and 2008, a decrease in participation at all adults level and amongst disabled people and women.

15 15 Attendance Residents of deprived areas 69% attendance – lower than amongst residents of other areas in Scotland (78%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to 2006 (67%) and 2004 (67%). Change is not statistically significant. Compared to others, less likely to attend rock or pop music events, musicals, cinema or plays. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at art galleries (15% to 24%).

16 16 Participation Residents of deprived areas 66% participation – lower than in other areas in Scotland (71%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of participation to that recorded in 2006 (68%) but higher than in 2004 (52%). Compared to residents of other areas, less likely to read books, buy a work of art or buy non-fiction. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in reading books (61% to 57%).

17 17 Attendance Disabled people 49% attendance – lower than amongst other respondents (82%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to that recorded in 2006 (48%) and 2004 (50%). Change is not statistically significant. Compared to other respondents, less likely to go to cinema, museums or rock & pop events. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at art galleries (13% to 18%).

18 18 Participation Disabled people 65% participation – lower than amongst other respondents (71%) KEY FACTS Overall participation decreased from 70% in 2006 to 65% (but remained higher than %) Less likely to read or buy books. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in crafts (21% to 12%).

19 19 Attendance Women 77% overall attendance amongst women – similar to men (76%) KEY FACTS Overall attendance in 2008 remained at the same level as recorded in 2006 (77%) Compared to males, less likely to attend rock or pop music events, but more likely to attend pantomimes or musicals. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at art galleries (23% to 29%) and museums (28% to 33%).

20 20 Participation Women 75% participation amongst women – higher than amongst males (66%) KEY FACTS Participation overall was lower than recorded in 2006 (80%) but still higher than in 2004 (69%). Compared to males, more likely to have read books, or take part in knitting/any other crafts. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in reading and buying books (73% to 66%).

21 21 Attendance Residents of rural areas 75% attendance – similar to residents of other areas (78%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to that recorded in 2006 (74%) and 2004 (75%). Change is not statistically significant. Compared to other areas, less likely to have visited the cinema or art galleries but more likely to have attended Scottish music events. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at rock & pop events (15% to 24%).

22 22 Participation Residents of rural areas 74% participation – slightly higher than residents of other areas, but not statistically significant (70%). KEY FACTS Participation remained at the same level as recorded in 2006 (74%). Compared to residents of other areas, more likely to have undertaken crafts (17% v 11%).

23 23 Attendance Aged 65 and over 49% attendance – much lower than amongst respondents aged under 65 (83%). KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to that recorded in 2006 (49%) and 2004 (52%). Change is not statistically significant. Compared to those under 65, much less likely to attend rock or pop music events, cinema or museums. Attendance across specific activities also remained broadly similar in 2008.

24 24 Participation Aged 65 and over 66% participation – slightly lower than amongst those aged under 65 (71%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of participation to that recorded in 2006 (69%) and 2004 (61%). Compared to those under 65, less likely to have bought a work of fiction, or participated in painting or drawing. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in knitting and other textile crafts (15% to 8%).

25 25 Attendance Aged % attendance –higher than amongst respondents aged 25 and over (75%). KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to that recorded in 2006 (93%) and 2004 (87%). Compared to those aged 25 and over, more likely to go to cinema and rock or pop music events, but less likely to attend pantomimes. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at rock and pop events (40% to 50%) and art galleries (15% to 24%).

26 26 Participation Aged % participation – similar to respondents aged 25 and over (71%). KEY FACTS Overall participation was lower than recorded in 2006 (73%) but similar to the participation level recorded in 2004 (65%). Changes are not statistically significant. More likely than those respondents aged 25 and over to have participated in painting/drawing or playing a musical instrument.

27 27 Attendance Minority ethnic communities 66% attendance – lower than amongst other residents of Scotland (78%) KEY FACTS Attendance decreased from 71% in Compared to others, less likely to attend rock or pop music events, plays and pantomimes. Compared to 2006, attendance at cinemas was the most significant decrease (59% to 48%).

28 28 Participation Minority ethnic communities 61% participation – lower than amongst other residents of Scotland (71%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of participation to that recorded in 2006 (65%) and 2004 (67%). Compared to other residents of Scotland, less likely to have read or bought books. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in reading books (58% to 50%).

29 29 Attendance and participation – Regions © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number:

30 30 Summary Combined attendance and participation by region Attendance & participation was lower in North Eastern Scotland than elsewhere and lower in this area than in 2006

31 31 Summary Attendance by region Between 2006 and 2008, a decrease in attendance in North Eastern Scotland and an increase in South Western Scotland Base: 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110)

32 32 Summary Participation by region Base: 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110) Since 2006, decreased participation in North Eastern Scotland and Glasgow & surrounds and increase in South.

33 33 Attendance Residents of Edinburgh and surrounds 77% attendance – the same level as across Scotland as a whole (77%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to that recorded in 2006 (81%). Change is not statistically significant. Compared to Scottish population as a whole, more likely to attend arts festivals, cinema, musicals or dance events. No significant changes between 2006 and 2008 in attendance of any specific event types.

34 34 Participation Residents of Edinburgh and surrounds 79% participation – higher than amongst residents of other areas in Scotland (71%) KEY FACTS Same level of participation to that recorded in 2006 (79%). Compared to other areas, more likely to read books. Compared to 2006, decreased proportions buying non-fiction books (33% to 25%) and buying works of art/craft (16% to 9%).

35 35 Attendance Residents of East & Central Scotland 74% attendance – similar to the all Scotland level (77%) KEY FACTS No statistically significant change from 2006 attendance levels (73%). Compared to Scottish population as a whole, more likely to attend pantomime/variety shows and plays but less likely to have visited art gallery Between 2006 and 2008, an increase in museum, rock/pop and pantomime/variety attendance

36 36 Participation Residents of East & Central Scotland 66% participation – lower than amongst Scottish population as a whole (71%) KEY FACTS Lower participation than recorded in 2006 (71%) but within margins of error Compared to 2006, a decreased proportion participated in painting/drawing

37 37 Attendance Residents of North Eastern Scotland 69% attendance – lower than across Scotland as a whole (77%) KEY FACTS Decreased overall attendance since 2006 (88%) Compared to Scottish population in general, less likely to go to cinemas, art galleries and museums Between 2006 and 2008, decreases in cinema, art galleries and museum attendance. Increase in attendance of plays.

38 38 Participation Residents of North Eastern Scotland 51% participation – lower than amongst Scottish population as a whole (71%) KEY FACTS Lower participation than recorded in 2006 survey (76%) Less likely to have read books than Scottish adults in general. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in reading books, buying art/craft objects, playing instruments, knitting/other textile crafts, writing stories/articles and Scottish traditional dancing

39 39 Attendance Residents of Highlands & Islands 75% attendance – similar to Scottish adults as a whole (77%) KEY FACTS Overall attendance levels equal to 2006 (75%) Compared to Scottish population as a whole, less likely to go to cinema and art galleries but more likely to attend an outdoor performance, traditional crafts and/or contemporary photography event Between 2006 and 2008, increase in rock/pop and contemporary photography attendance

40 40 Participation Residents of Highlands & Islands 86% participation – higher than amongst Scottish population as a whole (71%) KEY FACTS Lower participation than in 2006 (80%) but not statistically significant More likely to have participated in photography, knitting/textile crafts and buying any type of book Compared to 2006, decreased participation in reading books, with increases in photography and buying fiction/poetry

41 41 Attendance Residents of Glasgow & surrounds 77% attendance – equal to Scottish adults in general (77%) KEY FACTS No statistically significant change from 2006 (75%) Compared to Scottish population as a whole, less likely to go to plays and musicals but more likely to go to art galleries Between 2006 and 2008, an increase in art gallery attendance but a decrease in pantomime/variety show attendance

42 42 Participation Residents of Glasgow & surrounds 69% participation – similar to the Scottish population as a whole (71%) KEY FACTS No significant variations by activity types when compared to Scottish adults overall Compared to 2006, decreased participation in reading/buying books and buying art/craft objects

43 43 Attendance Residents of South Western Scotland 77% attendance – equal to Scottish adults as a whole (77%) KEY FACTS Higher participation than in 2006 (69%) Compared to Scottish population as a whole, less likely to go to cinema and arts festivals Between 2006 and 2008, an increase in attendance at museums, art galleries, rock/pop events and plays.

44 44 Participation Residents of South Western Scotland 72% participation – similar to Scottish population as a whole (71%) KEY FACTS Similar overall participation level to that recorded in 2006 (70%) More likely than Scottish adults in general to take part in knitting/other textile crafts but less likely to buy any type of book Compared to 2006, decreased participation in buying any books and buying art/crafts objects, but increase in photography

45 45 Attendance Residents of South Scotland 70% attendance – lower than Scottish adults as a whole (77%) KEY FACTS Compared to Scottish population as a whole, less likely to go to cinema. Between 2006 and 2008, an increase in attendance at plays and contemporary photography

46 46 Participation Residents of South Scotland 77% participation – higher than Scottish population as a whole (71%) KEY FACTS Higher participation than in 2006 (71%) More likely than Scottish adults overall to have bought a book other than fiction, read a book and/or taken part in photography Compared to 2006, increased participation in buying books, photography, writing stories/articles, crafts and writing poetry

47 47 Participation © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: Future attendance and participation

48 48 Events not attended in last 12 months but would consider in future Scottish adult population Highest interest in attending rock or pop music events, plays and musicals.

49 49 Highest interest in taking part in photography. Activities not undertaken in last 12 months but would consider in future Scottish adult population

50 50 Summary Interest in undertaking any new activities by group Highest propensity to attend or participate amongst those aged 16 to 24

51 51 Highest interest in attending or participating in future in the Highlands & Islands Summary Interest in undertaking any new activities by region

52 52 Developing attendance and participation Residents of deprived areas 60% would consider attending an arts or cultural event in the future, lower than in other areas (64%). 36% would consider participating in one or more arts or cultural event in the future, lower than in other areas (41%). ATTENDANCE PARTICIPATION Top 10 includes rock & pop, country & western music and jazz. Top 10 includes photography, painting & drawing and drama.

53 53 Developing attendance and participation Disabled people 48% would consider attending an arts or cultural event in the future, lower than amongst other adults (66%). 23% would consider participating in one or more arts or cultural event in the future, much lower than amongst those without a disability (44%). ATTENDANCE PARTICIPATION Top 10 includes cinema, museums and art galleries.

54 54 Developing attendance and participation Women 66% would consider attending an arts or cultural event in the future, higher than amongst men (61%). 42% would consider participating in one or more arts or cultural event in the future, similar to proportion on men (40%). ATTENDANCE PARTICIPATION Top 10 includes musicals, rock & pop and plays. Top 10 includes photography, painting & drawing, buying art and drama.

55 55 Developing attendance and participation Residents of rural areas 67% would consider attending an arts or cultural event in the future, slightly higher than in other areas (63%). 41% would consider participating in one or more arts or cultural event in the future, similar to other areas (40%). ATTENDANCE PARTICIPATION Top 10 includes rock & pop, cinema, musicals and museums. Top 10 includes photography, painting & drawing, playing a musical instrument and woodcrafts.

56 56 Developing attendance and participation People aged 65 and over 42% would consider attending an arts or cultural event in the future, lower than amongst those under 65 (69%). 17% would consider participating in one or more arts or cultural event in the future, lower than amongst those under 65 (46%). ATTENDANCE PARTICIPATION Top 10 includes museums, art galleries, cinema and musicals.

57 57 Developing attendance and participation People aged 16 to 24 70% would consider attending an arts or cultural event in the future, higher than those in older age groups (63%). 56% would consider participating in one or more arts or cultural event in the future, higher than those in older age groups (38%). ATTENDANCE PARTICIPATION Top 10 includes rock & pop, plays and musicals. Top 10 includes photography, painting & drawing, playing a musical instrument, drama and filming.

58 58 Developing attendance and participation Minority ethnic communities 64% would consider attending an arts or cultural event in the future, the same level as amongst other Scots (64%) 50% would consider participating in one or more arts or cultural event in the future, higher than amongst other Scots (41%). ATTENDANCE PARTICIPATION Top 10 includes museums, cinema, art galleries and art festivals. Top 10 includes reading books, photography and playing a musical instrument.

59 59 Participation © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: Developing attendance and participation

60 60 Influences on choice of arts & cultural events Scottish adult population Respondents in AB social classes, females and those aged and were more likely to be influenced by personal recommendations. Base: All respondents who have attended any arts or cultural events or participated in last year (1,880)

61 61 Influences on choice of arts & cultural events By under represented group Those aged 16 to 24 were the most likely to be influenced by recommendations (72%), reviews (62%) and the Internet (47%). Also, high use of the Internet amongst minority ethnic communities (43%).

62 62 Influences on choice of arts & cultural events By region Residents of Southern Scotland were most likely to be influenced by recommendations from friends or family (73%). Information on the Internet was most likely to influence those who lived in the North East (40%).

63 63 Distance willing to travel to arts/cultural activity Scottish adult population Those who had attended or participated in the arts in the last 12 months would travel a maximum of 33 miles, on average, to an arts or cultural activity.

64 64 Distance willing to travel to arts/cultural activity By under represented group On average, residents of rural areas would travel furthest to an arts or cultural activity and minority ethnic communities would travel the least distance. Average 33 miles 27 miles 22 miles 32 miles 37 miles 32 miles 23 miles 17 miles

65 65 Distance willing to travel to arts/cultural activity By region On average, residents of Southern Scotland, North Eastern Scotland and the Highlands & Islands would travel further to an arts or cultural activity. Average 33 miles 28 miles 40 miles 37 miles 28 miles 30 miles 44 miles

66 66 © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: Viewing, listening and Internet habits

67 67 Cultural entertainment listened to on the radio Scottish adult population Base: All respondents (2,110) 74% of the adult population listened to one or more of these outputs on the radio.

68 68 Cultural entertainment listened to – recorded Scottish adult population 82% of the adult population listened to one or more of these outputs on record, cassette, CD of MP3. Base: All respondents (2,110)

69 69 Internet usage Scottish adult population 49% of the adult population had undertaken one or more of these online activities during the previous 12 months - key activities were purchasing tickets for an arts performance, downloading music and using a social networking site Base: All respondents (2,110)

70 70 Viewing and listening habits Residents of deprived areas Residents of deprived areas were more likely to watch country & western music. Radio Recordings TV, DVD, Video viewing 92% viewed one or more (93% within other areas) Top 10 normally viewed 69% listened to one or more (74% within other areas) Top 10 normally listened to 80% listened to one or more (82% within other areas) Top 10 normally listened to Residents of deprived areas were generally less likely to listen to the radio but more likely to listen to country & western music. Residents of deprived areas were more likely to listen to country & western music recordings.

71 71 Internet usage Residents of deprived areas 34% of residents of deprived areas participated in one of the on-line activities listed, lower than in other areas (50%) People living in areas not defined as deprived were around twice as likely as those in deprived areas to purchase tickets on line, purchase or download music or buy a work of fiction or poetry on the Internet.

72 72 Viewing and listening habits Disabled people Disabled people were more likely to watch musicals, plays, country & western music and Scottish traditional music. Radio Recordings TV, DVD, Video viewing 89% viewed one or more (93% amongst other people) Top 10 normally viewed 59% listened to one or more (76% amongst other people) Top 10 normally listened to 65% listened to one or more (85% amongst other people) Top 10 normally listened to Disabled people were more likely to listen to country & western music on the radio or as recordings.

73 73 Internet usage Disabled people 16% of disabled people participated in one of the on-line activities listed, lower than amongst people without disabilities (55%) Disabled people were significantly less likely to undertake any of the activities listed.

74 74 Viewing and listening habits Women Women were more likely than men to watch musicals, plays, pantomimes and variety shows. Radio Recordings TV, DVD, Video viewing 92% viewed one or more (93% amongst men) Top 10 normally viewed 71% listened to one or more (75% amongst men) Top 10 normally listened to 80% listened to one or more (82% amongst men) Top 10 normally listened to Women were less likely than men to listen to rock or pop music on the radio or recordings.

75 75 Internet usage Women Women were less likely than men to have undertaken any of the on-line activities listed (43% and 55% respectively) Women were less likely than men to undertake most of the activities but equally likely to purchase a work of fiction or poetry on-line.

76 76 Viewing and listening habits Residents of rural areas Residents of rural areas were less likely to watch films but more likely to watch Scottish traditional folk music. Radio Recordings TV, DVD, Video viewing 92% viewed one or more (93% in other areas) Top 10 normally viewed 70% listened to one or more (74% in other areas) Top 10 normally listened to 82% listened to one or more (81% in other areas) Top 10 normally listened to Residents of rural areas were less likely to listen to rock or pop on the radio and recordings but more likely to listen to Scottish traditional music.

77 77 Internet usage Residents of rural areas Residents of rural areas were slightly less likely than residents of other areas to have undertaken any of the on-line activities listed (44% and 49% respectively) Residents of rural areas were less likely than those who lived in other areas to use social networking sites, to upload video or audio or to download film or television.

78 78 Viewing and listening habits Aged 16 to 24 Those aged were more likely than older people to watch film or rock & pop programmes. Radio Recordings TV, DVD, Video viewing 96% viewed one or more (92% aged 25 or over) Top 10 normally viewed 78% listened to one or more (73% aged 25 or over) Top 10 normally listened to 93% listened to one or more (80% aged 25 or over) Top 10 normally listened to Those aged were more likely than those in older age groups to listen to rock or pop music on the radio or recordings but less likely to listen to most other types of output.

79 79 Internet usage Aged 16 to 24 People aged 16 to 24 were almost twice as likely as those aged 25 or over to have undertaken one or more of the on-line activities listed (83% and 43% respectively) Over half of people in this age group had used a social networking site and/or purchased or downloaded music from the Internet.

80 80 Viewing and listening habits Aged 65 or over People aged 65 and over were more likely to watch musicals, plays, country & western music, Scottish traditional music and orchestral music. Radio Recordings TV, DVD, Video viewing 87% viewed one or more (93% aged under 65) Top 10 normally viewed 58% listened to one or more (77% aged under 65) Top 10 normally listened to 58% listened to one or more (86% aged under 65) Top 10 normally listened to People aged 65 and over were more likely to listen to country & western and/or Scottish traditional music on the radio and as recordings.

81 81 Internet usage Aged 65 and over Only 6% of those aged 65 and over had undertaken any of the on-line activities listed, a much smaller proportion than amongst younger people (59%). Respondents in this age group were much less likely to have undertaken any of the activities listed.

82 82 Viewing and listening habits Minority ethnic communities Members of ethnic minority communities were more likely to watch culturally specific music and dance. Radio Recordings TV, DVD, Video viewing 90% viewed one or more (93% other Scottish adults) Top 10 normally viewed 53% listened to one or more (74% other Scottish adults) Top 10 normally listened to 63% listened to one or more (82% other Scottish adults) Top 10 normally listened to Members of ethnic minority communities were more likely to listen to culturally specific music and musicals on the radio and on recordings.

83 83 Internet usage Minority ethnic communities 52% of members of ethnic minority communities undertook one or more of the on-line activities listed, a similar proportion to that recorded amongst other adults in Scotland (48%). Members of ethnic minority communities were more likely to purchase or download film or television programmes but less likely to buy tickets or a work of fiction/poetry on-line.

84 84 Analysis by art form © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number:

85 85 Analysis by art form – dance event attendees Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who attended dance events were more likely to be female, aged 35 and over, in the AB socio- economic groups and with a degree qualification. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity ACORN group*. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who attended dance events were more likely to be female, aged 35 and over, in the AB socio- economic groups and with a degree qualification. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity ACORN group*. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Trend In the 2008 survey, 11% of Scottish adults attended dance, a decrease from the proportions recorded in both 2004 (15%) and 2006 (14%). Trend In the 2008 survey, 11% of Scottish adults attended dance, a decrease from the proportions recorded in both 2004 (15%) and 2006 (14%). *Respondent postcodes have been profiled using ACORN (A Classification of Residential Neighbourhoods). For more details see

86 86 Analysis by art form – dance participation Includes Scottish traditional, culturally specific, contemporary and other dance Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who participated in dancing were more likely to be female, aged 55 or over, in the AB socio- economic groups and with a degree qualification. Members of ethnic minorities were also more likely to participate in dance. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who participated in dancing were more likely to be female, aged 55 or over, in the AB socio- economic groups and with a degree qualification. Members of ethnic minorities were also more likely to participate in dance. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group A large proportion of those who attended Scottish traditional dance events also participated in this activity (around a third). However, there was less overlap between participants and attendees of other types of dance. Trend In the 2008 survey, 3% of Scottish adults participated in Scottish traditional dance, not significantly different from the proportions recorded in both 2004 (4%) and 2006 (2%). Participation in contemporary dance remained at 1% across the three years of surveying. Trend In the 2008 survey, 3% of Scottish adults participated in Scottish traditional dance, not significantly different from the proportions recorded in both 2004 (4%) and 2006 (2%). Participation in contemporary dance remained at 1% across the three years of surveying.

87 87 Analysis by art form – theatre attendees Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who attend theatre performances were more likely to be female, aged 35 to 54, in the ABC1 social classes and either still in full time education or with a degree. They were also more likely to be in the Wealthy Achiever or Urban Prosperity ACORN groups*. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who attend theatre performances were more likely to be female, aged 35 to 54, in the ABC1 social classes and either still in full time education or with a degree. They were also more likely to be in the Wealthy Achiever or Urban Prosperity ACORN groups*. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Trend In the 2008 survey, 40% of Scottish adults attended a theatre performance, similar to the levels recorded in both 2004 (42%) and 2006 (42%). Trend In the 2008 survey, 40% of Scottish adults attended a theatre performance, similar to the levels recorded in both 2004 (42%) and 2006 (42%). Profiling of drama participants is not possible due to small sample size. *Respondent postcodes have been profiled using ACORN (A Classification of Residential Neighbourhoods). For more details see

88 88 Analysis by art form – visual arts attendees (excluding cinema) Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who attend visual arts performances (excluding cinema), were more likely to be aged 35-54, in the ABC1 socio-economic grips, still in full time education or with a degree qualification. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity and Wealth Achiever ACORN groups*. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who attend visual arts performances (excluding cinema), were more likely to be aged 35-54, in the ABC1 socio-economic grips, still in full time education or with a degree qualification. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity and Wealth Achiever ACORN groups*. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Trend In the 2008 survey, 41% of Scottish adults attended visual arts, a slight increase from the level recorded in 2006 (38%) and similar to the 2004 level (39%). Trend In the 2008 survey, 41% of Scottish adults attended visual arts, a slight increase from the level recorded in 2006 (38%) and similar to the 2004 level (39%). *Respondent postcodes have been profiled using ACORN (A Classification of Residential Neighbourhoods). For more details see

89 89 Analysis by art form – visual arts participation Includes printmaking, painting or drawing, photography, sculpture Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who participated in any visual arts, were more likely to be aged 16 to 34, in AB socio-economic groups and with a degree qualification or still in full time education. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who participated in any visual arts, were more likely to be aged 16 to 34, in AB socio-economic groups and with a degree qualification or still in full time education. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Trend In the 2008 survey, 15% of Scottish adults participated in visual arts, similar to the level recorded in 2006 (16%) and slightly higher than in 2004 (12%). Trend In the 2008 survey, 15% of Scottish adults participated in visual arts, similar to the level recorded in 2006 (16%) and slightly higher than in 2004 (12%).

90 90 Analysis by art form – music event attendees (includes rock or pop music events) Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who attend music events were more likely to be male, aged 16 to 34, ABs and either with a degree or in full time education. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity or Wealthy Achiever ACORN groups*. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who attend music events were more likely to be male, aged 16 to 34, ABs and either with a degree or in full time education. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity or Wealthy Achiever ACORN groups*. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Trend In the 2008 survey, 41% of Scottish adults attended a music performance, a slight increase from the level recorded in 2006 (38%) and similar to the 2004 level (40%). Trend In the 2008 survey, 41% of Scottish adults attended a music performance, a slight increase from the level recorded in 2006 (38%) and similar to the 2004 level (40%). *Respondent postcodes have been profiled using ACORN (A Classification of Residential Neighbourhoods). For more details see

91 91 Analysis by art form – playing a musical instrument Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who had played a musical instrument were more likely to be male, aged 16 to 34 and still in full time education. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who had played a musical instrument were more likely to be male, aged 16 to 34 and still in full time education. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Trend The proportion of the Scottish adult population playing a musical instrument remained at the same level in 2004, 2006 and 2008 (8%). Trend The proportion of the Scottish adult population playing a musical instrument remained at the same level in 2004, 2006 and 2008 (8%). A larger then average proportion of those who attended a music event played a musical instrument. Most notably 29% of those who attended an orchestral music event, 22% who attended a country and western music event and 21% who attended a Scottish folk/traditional music event played a musical instrument

92 92 Analysis by art form – craft event attendees Include traditional and contemporary craft events Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those attending craft events were more likely to be female, aged 55 or over, in the AB socio- economic groups and with a degree qualification. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those attending craft events were more likely to be female, aged 55 or over, in the AB socio- economic groups and with a degree qualification. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Around a quarter of those attending craft events also participated in one or more craft. Trend In the 2008 survey, 5% of Scottish adults attended a traditional crafts event and 3% attended a contemporary crafts event. Comparable data on attendance is not available for 2004 or Trend In the 2008 survey, 5% of Scottish adults attended a traditional crafts event and 3% attended a contemporary crafts event. Comparable data on attendance is not available for 2004 or 2006.

93 93 Analysis by art form – craft participants Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who took part in crafts were more likely to be female, aged 55+, in the AB socio-economic grades and/or residents of rural areas. They were more likely to be in the Comfortably Off ACORN group*. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who took part in crafts were more likely to be female, aged 55+, in the AB socio-economic grades and/or residents of rural areas. They were more likely to be in the Comfortably Off ACORN group*. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Trend In the 2008 survey, 13% of Scottish adults participated in any crafts, a similar level to those recorded in both 2004 (15%) and 2006 (15%). Trend In the 2008 survey, 13% of Scottish adults participated in any crafts, a similar level to those recorded in both 2004 (15%) and 2006 (15%). *Respondent postcodes have been profiled using ACORN (A Classification of Residential Neighbourhoods). For more details see

94 94 Analysis by art form – cinema attendees Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who go to the cinema were more likely to be aged 16 to 34, ABC1s and still in full time education. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity ACORN group*. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, those who go to the cinema were more likely to be aged 16 to 34, ABC1s and still in full time education. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity ACORN group*. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Trend In the 2008 survey, 55% of Scottish adults attended the cinema, a similar level to that recorded in 2006 (57%) and higher than the 2004 level (52%). Trend In the 2008 survey, 55% of Scottish adults attended the cinema, a similar level to that recorded in 2006 (57%) and higher than the 2004 level (52%). Profiling of those participating in film making is not possible due to small sample size. *Respondent postcodes have been profiled using ACORN (A Classification of Residential Neighbourhoods). For more details see

95 95 Analysis by art form – reading and buying books Population index = 100 Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, people who read books were slightly more likely to be female, ABC1s and/or with a degree qualification. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity ACORN group*. Profile Compared to the Scottish adult population, represented as an Index score of 100, people who read books were slightly more likely to be female, ABC1s and/or with a degree qualification. They were also more likely to be in the Urban Prosperity ACORN group*. Sex Age Socio-Economic Group Highest Qualification Under-represented groups ACORN group Trend In the 2008 survey, 61% of Scottish adults participated in reading and buying books. While this was a lower level than recorded in 2006 (67%) it remained above the level recorded in 2004 (56%). Trend In the 2008 survey, 61% of Scottish adults participated in reading and buying books. While this was a lower level than recorded in 2006 (67%) it remained above the level recorded in 2004 (56%). Profiling of those participating in writing and/or attending literary events is not possible due to small sample sizes. *Respondent postcodes have been profiled using ACORN (A Classification of Residential Neighbourhoods). For more details see

96 96 Attitudes and segmentation analysis © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number:

97 97 Attitudes statements– mean, median and mode scores 1= disagree strongly - 5 = agree strongly Base: 2110 Most people like to learn and experience new things in their leisure time and value for money is a priority. Mean

98 98 Distribution within population Cluster analysis segments the population according to their responses to the attitude statements. Each segment has been given a name and profiled to identify demographic and behavioural traits. The following slides provide some details of each segment. For full details see separate report. Time Poor Prudent Participants Restricted Opting Out Free Experienced Seekers 17%

99 99 Segment 1 – Time Poor - 21% of population Difficult to find time to take part in or attend arts and cultural activities The needs of family come first when planning leisure time Would attend more arts and cultural events if closer to home, easier access Like to learn and experience new things in leisure time Value for money is important when deciding what to do in leisure time Slightly higher than average attendance & participation levels esp. cinema. Slightly higher TV and Radio viewing and listening esp. rock/pop music and films. High use of Internet including social networking sites. More likely to be, but not exclusively: Aged 25 – 44 No disabilities Full or part time employed Higher, HNC or HND qualifications C1C2 socio-economic groups

100 100 Segment 2 – Prudent Participants -17% of population Would attend more arts and cultural events if closer to home, easier access Value for money is important when deciding what to do in leisure time Like to learn and experience new things in leisure time Have time to attend Higher than average attendance & participation levels esp. art galleries and museums. Average TV and Radio viewing and listening esp. plays, variety shows, traditional music. Fairly low use of Internet and on-line activity. More likely to be, but not exclusively: Female Aged 55+ Retired A range of levels of affluence and education levels

101 101 Segment 3 – Restricted - 17% of population Difficulties attending due to age, a disability or long term illness Feel out of place in an art gallery or museum Have difficulty finding information about arts and cultural activities If more events and better access would go more often Lower than average attendance & participation levels. Lower TV and Radio viewing and listening Very low use of Internet and on-line activity. More likely to be, but not exclusively: Aged 75+ Disabled or long term illness Retired Low income No qualifications DE socio-economic groups

102 102 Segment 4 – Opting Out - 14% of population Spending my time attending or participating in the arts and cultural activities is of little interest Feel out of place in an art gallery, museum or theatre The needs of family members take priority Would not attend more performances if closer to home, easier access Lowest attendance & participation levels Low TV, Internet and Radio viewing and listening. Very low use of Internet and on-line activity. More likely to be, but not exclusively : Aged 65+ Retired No qualifications DE socio-economic groups

103 103 Segment 5 – Free - 17% of population Value for money is not a high priority when deciding what to do in leisure time Needs of family are not a high priority when planning leisure time Fairly high attendance & participation levels esp. music events Slightly higher TV and Radio viewing and listening inc. opera and jazz music. High use of Internet and on- line activity including social networking sites, purchasing and downloading music and film. More likely to be, but not exclusively : Aged Full time employed or in full time education Have a degree or higher degree ABC1 socio-economic groups

104 104 Segment 6 – Experienced Seekers – 14% of population Attending and participating in arts and cultural activities helps to enrich the quality of my life I like to learn and experience new things in my leisure time High attendance & participation levels esp. theatre, museums, art galleries. Average TV, Internet and Radio viewing and listening. Listen to plays on radio & orchestral music recordings. High use of Internet esp. to purchase tickets for arts performances. More likely to be, but not exclusively : Aged No disabilities Employed or retired High income High levels of education AB socio-economic groups

105 105 Appendix - Definitions - Summary of survey method © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number:

106 106 Appendix – Art form category definitions Categories of art forms - Attendance Category Includes Any ArtsPlays, ballet, contemporary dance, Scottish traditional dance, other styles of dance, pantomime or variety show, opera/operetta, jazz music, Scottish traditional music, orchestral music, chamber music or recitals, country and western music, rock or pop music, literary or poetry event, cinema, musicals, arts festivals, carnivals/ circus, folk music Scottish, other Folk Music, video/multi media performance art, contemporary illustration, contemporary painting, contemporary drawing, contemporary printmaking, contemporary sculpture, contemporary photography, contemporary video/ multi-media, contemporary installation, contemporary crafts, art galleries, museums. Any visual arts (exc.cinema)Contemporary illustration, contemporary painting, contemporary drawing, contemporary printmaking, contemporary sculpture, contemporary photography, contemporary video/ multi-media, contemporary installation, contemporary crafts, art galleries, museums. Any musicOpera/operetta, chamber music and recitals, rock or pop music, Scottish folk music, other folk music, orchestral music, jazz music, Scottish traditional music, country and western music. Any performance in a theatrePlays, ballet, Scottish traditional dance, contemporary dance, other styles of dance, pantomime or variety show, opera/ operetta, musicals. Any danceBallet, contemporary dance, Scottish traditional dance, other styles of dance. Category Includes Any ArtsDrama, opera or light opera, singing in a choir, Scottish traditional dance, ballet, contemporary dance, other style dance, playing a musical instrument, folk/ Scottish traditional music, writing poetry, writing stories or articles, reading books, buying a work of fiction or poetry, buying any other types of book, painting or drawing, printmaking, sculpture, photography (other than family or holiday snaps), knitting/other textile crafts, wood crafts, any other crafts, making films (apart from video), filming on video (apart from 'family' life or events), buying a work of art or craft object. Reading and buying booksBuying a work of fiction or poetry, reading books. Any visual artsPrintmaking, painting or drawing, photography, sculpture. Undertaking any craftsKnitting, other textile crafts, wood crafts, any other crafts. Any performanceDrama, amateur singing, choir, Scottish traditional dance, playing a musical instrument, amateur opera or light opera, amateur dance or ballet. Any writingWriting stories, poetry. Categories of art forms - Participation

107 107 Appendix – Defining deprived areas The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) identifies the most deprived areas across Scotland based on indicators relating to income, employment, housing, health, education, skills and training and geographic access to services and telecommunications. SIMD can be analysed according to electoral ward, enabling small pockets of deprivation to be identified. For the purpose of this survey all of Scotlands 1,222 wards have been ranked from most deprived (1) to least deprived (1,222) and those which fall into the bottom 10% of this ranking have been defined as deprived areas. This approach is consistent with that used by the Scottish Government to define levels of deprivation in small geographical areas. Within the core sample, which represents Scotlands adult population as a whole, some 358 interviews were undertaken within areas which met this definition. In addition, a further 215 booster interviews were carried out within these areas. This group are entitled Residents of deprived areas. See for further details.www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/SIMD/

108 108 Appendix –Defining rural areas Within Scotland many issues have an urban and rural context and it is acknowledged that the patterns of attendance and participation in the arts and attitudes towards the arts are no exception. While certain areas of Scotland such as the Highlands or the Borders may be regarded as rural, it is recognised that some locations within these areas are actually urban. For the 2004, 2006 and 2008 surveys a classification developed by the Scottish Government has been used to define whether an area is rural or urban. This classification builds upon the Scottish Governments core classification that classifies settlements with a population of over 3,000 to be urban. The classification is based on both the size of settlements and how close they are to larger settlements in terms of 'drive times' as described overleaf. For the purposes of this survey these groups have been collapsed into 2 broad categories: Urban and small town– combination of large and other urban areas, accessible and remote small towns – total sample of 1,647 within core sample. Rural – combination of accessible and remote rural – total sample of 463 within core sample. A separate analysis of the 463 interviews undertaken in rural areas is presented in this report. This group are entitled Residents of rural areas. See for further details.www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/07/ /0

109 109 Appendix – Summary of survey method To meet the study objectives, some 4,944 face-to-face in-home interviews were undertaken throughout Scotland. Fieldwork took place between 7 th March 2008 and 29 th June Of this total, some 2,110 interviews represented the core sample, representative of the Scottish adult population in terms of geographical distribution, age, working status, ethnicity and socio-economic grade. The results obtained amongst this sample are comparable with those obtained amongst equivalent, similar sized core samples in 2004 and To increase the accuracy of the survey results relating to certain key under represented groups, a number of additional booster interviews were undertaken. The table below illustrates the numbers of these booster interviews undertaken amongst each group, the numbers of interviews undertaken within the core sample and total sample sizes when these elements are combined. Booster interviews Within core sample Total sample Residents of deprived areas Disabled people Women01,194 Residents of rural areas0463 People aged 65 and over People aged 16 to Members of minority ethnic communities The attendance and participation results of each of these under-represented groups, based on these total sample sizes, are reported separately in this report. It was also required that results obtained at a regional level could be analysed and compared separately. As such, an additional 1,573 interviews were undertaken as regional boosters in areas with a lower share of the Scottish adult population. Regional results regarding attendance and participation are reported in this report. The fieldwork methods used in 2008 were identical to those in 2006, thereby ensuring that results would be directly comparable. Interviews were undertaken in the homes of respondents at over 400 sampling points across Scotland, including the main islands, which were selected on the basis of geodemographic analysis undertaken using CACIs ACORN classification (A Classification of Residential Neighbourhoods).


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