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UNIT STANDARD 27366 DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF CROWD CONTROL IN A SECURITY CONTEXT.

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Presentation on theme: "UNIT STANDARD 27366 DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF CROWD CONTROL IN A SECURITY CONTEXT."— Presentation transcript:

1 UNIT STANDARD 27366 DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF CROWD CONTROL IN A SECURITY CONTEXT

2 This unit standard covers knowledge of crowd control in a security context. People credited with this unit standard are able to demonstrate knowledge of: The requirements and responsibilities of security personnel undertaking crowd control; Screening for intoxication and possession of liquor in a crowd control environment; Management of risk by security personnel in a crowd control environment.

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5 EVIDENCE OF AGE DOCUMENTS A security officer acting with the authority of the occupier to act as their agent is able to ask people entering a licensed premise to produce a form of ID to confirm their age. Evidence of age documents are: New Zealand or overseas passport; NZ photo drivers licence [issued under the Land Transport Act 1998]; HANZ [Hospitality Association of NZ] 18+ card. Security officers working with authority of the occupant [licensee] should refuse entry to people who are suspected to be underage who cannot produce valid age documentation.

6 RESTRICTED AND SUPERVISED AREAS It is illegal to allow anyone under the age of 18 to: Enter a Restricted area in a licensed premise under any circumstances. The licensee and / or duty manager can be fined up to $2000 per minor found in a restricted area. Enter a Supervised area in a licensed premise unless accompanied [supervised] by a parent or legal guardian [person who has been appointed as guardian by the court –Care of Children Act 2004] The licensee and / or duty manager can be fined up to $2000 per minor found unsupervised in a Supervised area. A security officer acting with the authority of the occupier to act as their agent is able to ask people entering restricted and supervised areas to produce a form of ID to confirm their age, and to help remove people unable to produce acceptable ID from such areas. Minors found in a restricted bar or unsupervised in a supervised bar commit an offence and are liable to a fine of $1000.00.

7 INTOXICATED PERSONS Under section 248 [1] [2] and [3], licensees, duty managers, and service staff who serve alcohol to intoxicated persons are liable to a fine [up to $10,000 for licensees and or duty managers, and up to $2000 for service staff] and suspension of the licensees licence for up to 7 days if they serve alcohol to intoxicated people: Under section 249 [1] and [2], licensees and / or duty managers can be fined up to $10,000 and have the premises licence suspended for up to 7 days for allowing a person to become intoxicated. So not only can an intoxicated person not be served alcohol they must be prevented from getting alcohol from any source once intoxicated [e.g. must not allow others to buy them or give them alcohol]. Under section 252 licensees and duty/mangers can be fined up to $5000 for allowing any person to be or remain on a licenced premises. It is a defence if as soon as the became aware of the person they either took them to a place of safety in the licenced premises, - or removed the person Security personnel to refuse entry to intoxicated patrons in accordance with the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act.

8 DRUNKENNESS AND DISORDERLY CONDUCT Under Section 253: Any licensee or duty manager commits an offence and is liable to a fine not exceeding $10,000 who, being the licensee or a manager of any premise allows any violent, quarrelsome, insulting, or disorderly conduct to take place on the licensed premises. It is a defence to a charge under subsection [1] of this section if the defendant satisfies the Court that, as soon as the defendant or any employee of the licensee became aware of the situation reasonable steps were taken in respect of each person concerned, either to take that person to a place of safety on the licensed premises [a place of safety is considered to be a place where they can be supervised to ensure they do not obtain more alcohol, where they can wait for a short period of time until they can be safely removed from the premises – E.g. wait for a taxi to collect them, or friends to escort them] or to remove that person from the licensed premises. Security personnel who notice disorderly conduct on the premises and are acting on behalf of the licensee, should warn the bar manager / staff; offer assistance to the intoxicated person e.g. water, food, arrangement of transport home; observe and report on any threatening behaviour; call for back up if required; intervene if safe to do so; remove person from premises or isolate as appropriate.

9 CARRYING AWAY LIQOUR FROM PREMISES A security officer acting with the authority of the occupier to act as their agent is able to prevent people who are leaving the premises from taking alcohol away from the licensed area. E.g. Liquor purchased in a licensed premises cannot be removed from the licensed area unless it is purchased under an off- licence [such as bottle-stores and supermarkets]. Under the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act allowing liquor to be sold and taken from a licensed area without an off-licence [not consumed in the premises] could be considered unauthorised sale or supply with a fine of up to $20,000 and loss of licence for up to 7 days, so security need to act on behalf of the licensee to prevent this e.g. security guards at bars, etc. cannot let patrons going outside to smoke with their drinks unless there is an outside area that is part of the premises property and is licensed.

10 Being on a licenced premises after/outside of trading hours Being on licensed premises outside licensing hours (1)A person commits an offence who on any day is found in any part of any licensed premises, other than club premises, that is used principally or exclusively for the sale, supply, or consumption of alcohol, at any time that (a) is not a time when a special licence applies to the premises; and (b) is not between 6 am and the time when the next period of permitted trading hours for the premises begins; and (c) is (i) more than 30 minutes after the premises are required to close for the sale of alcohol; or (ii) a time when the premises are required to be closed for the sale of alcohol (2) A person who commits an offence against subsection (1) is liable on conviction to a fine of not more than $2,000. (3) Subsection (1) does not apply to (a) the licensee (b) the licensee's spouse, civil union partner, or de facto partner: (c) a manager: (d) a manager's spouse, civil union partner, or de facto partner: (e) a member of the immediate family of the licensee or a manager: (f) an employee of the licensee who does not live on the premises, during the hours he or she is employed to work on the premises, and for 60 minutes after those hours have ended: (g) a person who is the agent of the licensee, or acting under a contract with the licensee or a manager, and has the authority of the licensee or a manager to enter the premises (i) to clean, repair, or restock the premises (or any equipment in them); or (ii) to check or remove cash: (h) a person who has the authority of the licensee or a manager to enter the premises to remove equipment (for example, band equipment): (i) an employee of the licensee who lives on the premises: (j) a person who lodges on the premises: (k) a genuine guest of a person described in paragraph (i) or (j) while that person is on the premises. (4) Subsection (1) does not apply in respect of a person who is found on any premises where an on-licence is in force if (a) a special licence is also in force for those premises at the material time; and (b) that person's presence on the premises at that time is justified in terms of the special licence.

11 Being on a licenced premises after/outside of trading hours 256 Allowing people on licensed premises outside licensing hours (1) A licensee or a manager of any licensed premises who allows a person to be on licensed premises in contravention of section 255 commits an offence. (2) A person who commits an offence against subsection (1) is liable on conviction to a fine of not more than $10,000. Under the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act allowing liquor to be sold outside of trading hours could be considered unauthorised sale or supply with a fine of up to $20,000 for the licensee. A security officer acting with the authority of the occupier to act as their agent is able to ask people to finish their drinks and leave the premises when the establishment closes business for the day, or may need to restrict entry to a bar before licensed hours – e.g. at an event.

12 Trespass and unauthorised access Security personnel acting with the authority of the occupier to act as their agent are able to utilise the provisions of the Trespass Act 1980 and section 56 of the Crimes Act 1961 to exclude from entering / remove a person that breaches the act. Section 3 - Trespass after warning to leave [1] Every person commits an offence against this Act who trespasses on any place and, after being warned to leave that place by an occupier of that place, neglects or refuses to do so. Section 4 - Trespass after warning to stay off [when papers have been officially served] Subject to subsection [5] of this section, every person commits an offence against this Act who, being a person who has been warned under this section to stay off any place, wilfully trespasses on that place within 2 years after the giving of the warning.

13 Smoke free environment The Smoke Free Environments Act 1990 identifies a number of offences or actions which are illegal. For example: 5 - Smoking in workplaces prohibited 7A - Smoking prohibited at schools and early childhood education and care centres 8 - Smoking prohibited on aircraft 9 - Smoking restricted in passenger service vehicles 12 – Smoking on licensed premises 13 - Smoking in restaurants A security officer acting with the authority of the occupier to act as their agent is able to utilise the provisions of the Trespass Act1980 and section 56 of the Crimes Act 1961 to either exclude a person from entering or remove a person that creates a breach of the act and / or the policies of individual outdoor venues and stadiums.

14 Roles and responsibilities of security personnel providing crowd control Restricting entry e.g. Prevent entry of unauthorised people onto the premises or into restricted areas as applicable to relevant instructions Enforcing terms and conditions for entry e.g. May relate to: Prohibited items such as alcohol. Validation of entrance documents E.g. are they fake, do they belong to the person in question, are they current? Does the patron conform with the dress standards on the venue? Dealing with intoxicated patrons e.g. In line with the licensees obligations under the Sale of Liquor Act 1989, safety of persons involved, calming situations, avoiding escalation, avoiding involvement of other patrons.

15 Roles and responsibilities of security personnel providing crowd control Liaising with NZ Police e.g. As required in relation to status updates, incident reports, traffic management, PR etc. Dealing with disruptive patrons e.g. Upholding safety of persons involved, calming situations, avoiding escalation, avoiding involvement of other patrons. Removal of patrons e.g. Upholding safety of persons involved, calming situations, avoiding escalation, avoiding involvement of other patrons. Maintaining health and safety e.g. Ensuring venue capacity restrictions are not exceeded. Remaining vigilant and isolating / dealing with / reporting any hazards immediately. Helping individuals in need with getting medical assistance. Ensuring fire doors remain clear and unlocked stairways are clear, and that signage and emergency lighting is in operation

16 Roles and responsibilities of security personnel providing crowd control Liaising with licensing inspectors e.g. Relationship building, facilitating any inspections required. It is an offence under the Sale of Liquor Act to refuse entry or assistance to licensing inspectors or police who are carrying out a lawful licensing inspection. Any person [including security] who commits this offence can be fined up to $2,000. Dealing with underage patrons e.g. Refusing entry to underage patrons if applicable to conditions of entry. Calling for assistance if required to protect the welfare of underage patrons under the Children, Young Persons, and Their Families Act 1989.

17 Requirements to help create a positive impression of employer and / or contractor organisation Personal presentation Wear uniform and PPE in accordance with SOPs. Wear COA ID - Under the Private Security Personnel and Private Investigators Act 2010, COA IDs must be worn by security personnel at all times, unless they are acting as private investigators or wearing the ID will put them at risk of harm. Ensure clothing is clean and neat. Ensure personal hygiene is of a high standard, hair and facial hair is kept neat and tidy Professional standards Be reliable, punctual, honest and trustworthy. Meet requirements of SOPs, client and relevant legislation. Uphold reputation of security organisation. Maintaining goodwill and professionalism with patrons Be firm, authoritative, assertive but also polite, respectful, approachable. Earn respect of others by providing a reassuring presence. Promoting a positive customer service attitude at all times.

18 Duty of Care Duty of care is the legal obligation for all individuals to take reasonable care while performing any acts that could possibly harm others. Care taken by following policies and procedures and legislation relating to: Own conduct Use of equipment Security of property Dealing with others to avoid harm to self or others while on duty. For example: Dealing with the general public in line with SOPs and legislation, e.g. avoiding use of excessive force

19 Intoxication Intoxicated means observably affected by alcohol, other drugs, or other substances (or a combination of 2 or all of those things) to such a degree that 2 or more of the following are evident: (a) appearance is affected: (b) behaviour is impaired: (c) co-ordination is impaired: (d) speech is impaired

20 Levels of Intoxication SlightCoordination: Starts to appear clumsy, slow /delayed reactions. Appearance: Eyes – glassy expression / blank stare Speech: Some slurring; becoming loud. Behaviour: Over friendly, inappropriate actions or language ModerateCoordination: May stagger or stumble when walking. May bump into people knock things over. May sway when standing still. Appearance: Eyes – Cant focus, avoids eye contact, bloodshot eyes. Looks sleepy. Dishevelled appearance Strong smell of alcohol on breath. Speech: Often slurring, speech is loud repetitive. The personhas difficulty concentrating or forming words. Behaviour: Becoming argumentative aggressive. ExtremeCoordination: Significant staggering stumbling, very unsteady on feet – cant remain still, may need to use something for support Appearance: Falling asleep. Very dishevelled. Over powering smell of alcohol on breath. Speech: Very slurred, becomes very difficult to understand. Unable to talk. Loses train of thought. Behaviour: Very aggressive. Acting irrationally

21 Procedures to follow when screening people Screening people for intoxication when they are seeking entry to the premises Security personnel to refuse entry to intoxicated patrons in accordance with the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act and In accordance with relevant instructions Security officers on the look out for the major identifiable signs of intoxication such as: Change in speech speed [slow to fast], Decrease in alertness, Inappropriate speech volume or slurred speech, Inappropriate sweating, Red or bloodshot eyes, Deterioration of motor control - stumbling, bumping into things people, swaying. Sleepy / fatigue, Messy appearance – spilt food / drink on clothes, dishevelled clothes. Strong smell of alcohol

22 Procedures to follow when screening people Screening people for possession of liquor on entry and exit to the premises In accordance with legal requirements Prevent people moving alcohol to unlicensed areas in accordance with the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act Any search must be lawful, i.e. have direct / implied consent of patrons being searched. In accordance with relevant instructions Bag searches – Individuals asked to cooperate as per conditions of entry. Person actively involved in the search, asked to remove items open zippers etc. If no alcohol is found, then the person is able to progress in or out of the venue. If alcohol is found, security officer explains that this contravenes entry conditions. Person is asked to surrender or dispose of the alcohol and is then allowed to continue.

23 Aspects of your Operational Environment Type of patron Age of patron – younger crowd may be more volatile than an older group. May be higher risk of underage patrons trying to gain entry in a younger crowd. Likelihood of illegal substances may be increased. Males / females – males more likely to be aggressive Layout of premises Security need to be aware of the number of entry / exit points, security of boundary. CCTV coverage of the premises, presence of shadowy unlit areas. Surrounding locality including any local bylaws that may be relevant Security should have knowledge of locality and associated risks e.g. crime levels. Restrictions in place in locality e.g. road rules, liquor bans. Type of event e.g. Different types of event attract different types of crowds and may be may be more volatile, e.g. a music concert requires tighter security than a family event. Time and length of event also impacts on security provision e.g. all day / all night, am / pm.

24 Procedures for managing intoxicated patrons in a crowd control environment In accordance with legal requirements Actions to be in accordance with the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act. Must inform Manager staff about the intoxicated person, prevent serving of alcohol. A security officer acting with the authority of the occupier to act as their agent is able to utilise the provisions of the Trespass Act 1980 and section 56 of the Crimes Act 1961 to either exclude a person from entering or remove a person that creates a breach of the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act 1989. In accordance with relevant instructions Stay calm. Use firmness and state requests with authority. Try to establish the best way of the person getting home safely. Use non-threatening words & tone [avoid derogatory words like "drunk"]. Show concern for the safety and comfort of the intoxicated person. Offer alternatives such as non-alcoholic drinks & food. Repeat decisions and statements paraphrasing as much as possible to make sure the person understands and follows what is said. Don't argue or offer resistance to verbal assault. Could try to calm the situation by agreeing with the possibility of what the person is saying. Protect self with distance, avoid being surrounded and maintain an open exit. Never argue with an intoxicated person, as it may lead to a physical confrontation. If physical safety is threatened, call for assistance.

25 Procedures for monitoring crowd behaviour and identifying changing circumstances in a crowd control environment Security officers must remain vigilant and aware of any changes to the situation and environment and be better able to respond quickly and appropriately as changes in the security environment can occur quickly - from a crowd of people being happy to riotous. Not all changes are obvious, sometimes subtle changes can occur almost undetected. A small disagreement between two parties escalating quickly to involve a larger group. Security officers must maintain surveillance of their designated area of authority, and communicate with colleagues as per SOPs, e.g. welfare checks, status updates, incident reports. Any identified changes must be reported accurately in a timely manner toappropriate personnel.

26 Procedures for managing adverse behaviour in a crowd control environment Harassment In accordance with legal requirements NOTE: Under the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act it is an offence to allow drunkenness or disorderly conduct in a licensed premise. Harassment could be considered disorderly conduct if occurring in a licensed premise, and as such any person continuing to act in this manner should be removed. In accordance with relevant instructions Safety of self and others is a priority. Observe and record activities, approach and intervene if safe to do so, or call for back up. Isolate parties involved if practicable to do so. If situation can be resolved withdraw but continue to observe and record details of activities.

27 Procedures for managing adverse behaviour in a crowd control environment Verbal abuse In accordance with legal requirements NOTE: Under the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act it is an offence to allow drunkenness or disorderly conduct in a licensed premise. Verbal abuse could be considered disorderly conduct if occurring in a licensed premise, and as such any person continuing to act in this manner should be removed. In accordance with relevant instructions Safety of self and others is a priority. If verbal abuse is directed at patron or colleague: Observe and record activities, approach and intervene if safe to do so, or call for back up. Isolate parties involved if practicable to do so. If situation can be resolved, withdraw but continue to observe and record details of activities. If verbal abuse is directed at self: Remain calm and objective, do not become aggressive in retaliation. Try to soothe the situation. Remove self to position of safety should situation escalate, call for back up if necessary. Isolate parties involved if practicable to do so. If situation can be resolved withdraw and continue to observe and record details of activities

28 Procedures for managing adverse behaviour in a crowd control environment Indecent behaviour In accordance with legal requirements NOTE: Under the Supply and Sale of Liquor Act it is an offence to allow drunkenness or disorderly conduct in a licensed premise. Indecent behaviour could be considered disorderly conduct if occurring in a licensed premise, and as such any person continuing to act in this manner should be removed. In accordance with relevant instructions Safety of self and others is a priority. Isolate the area, redirect approaching persons, observe and record activities, approach and intervene if safe to do so, or call for back up. Isolate parties involved if practicable to do so. May be necessary to call the police who could make an arrest if appropriate.

29 Communication of security status of venue The person the security officer reports to i.e. Team leader, supervisor, security manager, duty manager of a licensed premise. To ensure all required information is communicated as per instructions. To ensure advice, information, decision-making can be made by the appropriate party. To reduce liability to self, your security organisation, and clients. To ensure information has been recorded, e.g. incident reports lost children / items or ICP report. Emergency services So that high risk situations can be dealt with by officials. To reduce the risk to self which could occur due to trying to handle a high risk situation. To reduce the risk of injury, medical complications and damage to persons and property. To reduce the risk of damage to the security organisations reputation, which could occur should the situation get out of hand, but security officers failed to call for official assistance. To reduce liability to self and security organisation


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