Ppt on recycling of solid waste

Waste and Recycling Notes Waste Disposal. Love Canal — There Is No “Away” Between 1842-1953, Hooker Chemical sealed multiple chemical wastes into steel.

materials have been dumped in landfills or burned. Why not use them! General Purpose Recycling saves land, reduces the amount of solid waste, energy consumption and pollution. Ex. recycling one aluminum can saves the energy of about 6 oz. of gasoline. Examples Gold, lead, nickel, steel, copper, silver, zinc, and aluminum are recyclable. Problems Recycling does have environmental costs. It uses energy and generates pollution. Ex. the de-inking/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 16. WHAT ARE SOLID WASTE AND HAZARDOUS WASTE, AND WHY ARE THEY PROBLEMS? Section 16-1.

take back various discarded consumer products, such as electronic equipment, appliances, and motor vehicles. You can save resources by reducing your output of solid waste and pollution WHY IS REUSING AND RECYCLING MATERIALS SO IMPORTANT? Section 16-3 Reuse is an important way to reduce solid waste and pollution, and to save money Increasingly substituted throwaway items for reusable ones, which has resulted in growing masses/


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 13e CHAPTER 16: Solid and Hazardous Waste.

1/3 of world’s solid waste Mining, agricultural, industrial – 98.5% Municipal solid waste – 1.5% High-waste economy Examples 16-2 How Should We Deal with Solid Waste? Concept 16-2 A sustainable approach to solid waste is first to reduce it, then to reuse or recycle it, and finally to safely dispose of what is left. Dealing with Solid Waste Waste management Waste reduction Integrated waste management Producing Less Waste Refuse Reduce Reuse Recycle Reducing Resource/


Chapter 22 Solid and Hazardous Waste. Chapter Overview Questions  What is solid waste and how much do we produce?  How can we produce less solid waste?

to grave approach my help Figure 22-4 2 Reasons to Reduce the amount of Solid Waste we Produce  ¾ ths of it is Unnecessary  We could recycle 90% of the MSW we produce  Production of products we often use and discard creates huge amounts of air pollution, green- house gases, water pollution, and land degradation Solid Wastes are only raw materials we’re too stupid to use. ARTHUR C.CLARKE/


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 13e CHAPTER 16: Solid and Hazardous Waste.

United States Produces 1/3 of world’s solid waste Mining, agricultural, industrial – 98.5% Municipal solid waste – 1.5% High-waste economy Examples 16-2 How Should We Deal with Solid Waste? Concept 16-2 A sustainable approach to solid waste is first to reduce it, then to reuse or recycle it, and finally to safely dispose of what is left. Dealing with Solid Waste Waste management Waste reduction Integrated waste management Fig. 16-4, p/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 16. Three big ideas Priorities for dealing with solid waste should be to produce less of it (reduce), reuse, and recycle.

-to-grave responsibility laws that require companies to take back various discarded consumer products, such as electronic equipment, appliances, and motor vehicles. You can save resources by reducing your output of solid waste and pollution WHY IS REUSING AND RECYCLING MATERIALS SO IMPORTANT? Section 16-3 There are many ways to reuse the items we purchase There are two types/


By: Shannon Reece Solid Waste & Recycling. Solid waste – The waste materials produced in homes, businesses, schools, and other places in the community.

, burning facilities, or incinerators don’t take up as much room as landfills. Heat produced by burning the solid waste can be used to make electricity. RECYCLING SOLID WASTE Biodegradable - A substance that can be broken down and recycled by bacteria and other decomposers. Recycling reduces the volume of solid waste. Most of the products people use are not biodegradable, like plastic container, metal cans, rubber tires, and glass jars. People/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 21. Core Case Study: E-waste—An Exploding Problem (1)  Electronic waste, e-waste: fastest growing solid waste problem.

ml Containers What Can You Do? Reuse There Are Two Types of Recycling (1)  Primary, closed-loop recycling  Secondary recycling  Types of wastes that can be recycled Preconsumer: internal waste Postconsumer: external waste There Are Two Types of Recycling (2)  Do items actually get recycled?  What are the numbers?  Will the consumer buy recycled goods? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling  Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs)  Source separation Pay-as-you-throw Fee/


17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT Chapter 21 Solid and Hazardous Waste.

. 21-9, p. 565 There Are Two Types of Recycling (1) Primary, closed-loop recycling Materials recycled into same type: aluminum cans Secondary recycling Materials converted to other products: tires Types of wastes that can be recycled Preconsumer: internal waste Postconsumer: external waste There Are Two Types of Recycling (2) Do items actually get recycled? What are the numbers? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling (1) Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs) Can encourage/


Do Now: Many people know and say that recycling is the right and smart thing to do; however, The United States still only recycles 32% of their garbage.

materials have been dumped in landfills or burned. Why not use them! General Purpose Recycling saves land, reduces the amount of solid waste, energy consumption and pollution. Ex. recycling one aluminum can saves the energy of about 6 oz. of gasoline. Examples Gold, lead, nickel, steel, copper, silver, zinc, and aluminum are recyclable. Problems Recycling does have environmental costs. It uses energy and generates pollution. Ex. the de-inking/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 21. Core Case Study: E-waste—An Exploding Problem (1)  Electronic waste, e-waste: fastest growing solid waste problem.

(PET) plastic  Paper, plastic, or reusable cloth bags Pros Cons There Are Two Types of Recycling  Primary, closed-loop recycling  Secondary recycling  Types of wastes that can be recycled Preconsumer: internal waste Postconsumer: external waste  Do items actually get recycled?  What are the numbers?  Will the consumer buy recycled goods? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling  Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs)  Source separation Pay-as-you-throw Fee-per-bag  Which/


Solid wastes are only raw materials we’re too stupid to use. Arthur C Clarke.

cloth bags – Pros – Cons Energy Consumption Involved with Using Different Types of 350 ml Containers There Are Two Types of Recycling Primary, closed-loop recycling Secondary recycling Types of wastes that can be recycled – Preconsumer: internal waste – Postconsumer: external waste Do items actually get recycled? What are the numbers? Will the consumer buy recycled goods? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs) Source separation – Pay-as-you-throw/


Sustainable Environment (Sujalam-Suphalam) by Partnering with Nature SLK FOUNDATION Creating of Wealth from Waste Please spread.

, railway tracks, are littered with plastic/paper waste, debris, etc. Unfortunately our citizens do not assist in recycling of garbage at all. The root of the problem is in our bad habits, of not recycling man made things. Earth (Prithvi) Solid Waste Disposal Use of Chemical Fertilizers and Pesticides Earth (Prithvi) Solid Waste Disposal Use of Chemical Fertilizers and Pesticides Story of Deonar dump of Mumbai : Apathy of citizens and Negligence by BMC The Deonar/


Moving Towards Sustainable Materials Management Presentation to the Air and Waste Management Association Southern Section Annual Conference September 13,

50% of its wastes to recycling; – –CAFB saw an average profit of $40,000 in sale of recyclable materials. Recycling can Supplement the Local and State Tax Base The State of Tennessee reports – –In 2010, Tennessee Communities recycled 1.9 million tons of solid waste saving $69 million in disposal costs; – –Recycling Marketing Cooperative of Tennessee helps rural Tennessee communities of less than 10,000 population with recycling; RMCT returns an average of $42,000 in recycling revenues/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 16. WHAT ARE SOLID WASTE AND HAZARDOUS WASTE, AND WHY ARE THEY PROBLEMS? Section 16-1.

. 415 You can save resources by reducing your output of solid waste and pollution WHY IS REUSING AND RECYCLING MATERIALS SO IMPORTANT? Section 16-3 There are many ways to reuse the items we purchase Composting is a form of recycling that mimics nature’s recycling of nutrients Involves using decomposer bacteria to recycle yard trimmings, food scraps, and other organic wastes. The resulting organic material can be added to/


Reducing Waste to Reduce Costs Steve Brachman, Waste Reduction Specialist Solid & Hazardous Waste Education Center.

Waste Reduction Specialist Solid & Hazardous Waste Education Center Today’s Discussion Highlights Innovations and trends in recycling Source reduction strategies Future recycling issues C & D – specs and the WasteCap Trace program Food waste composting via the Milwaukee Community Compost network Recycling Trends & Innovations Single stream well institutionalized Stable recycling/ = economies of scale will be incentivized Organics = #1 material in waste stream Synergy between recycling and energy conservation


Chapter 22 Solid and Hazardous Waste. Chapter Overview Questions  What is solid waste and how much do we produce?  How can we produce less solid waste?

% is burned in incinerators. Electronic Waste: A Growing Problem  E-waste consists of toxic and hazardous waste such as PVC, lead, mercury, and cadmium.  The U.S. produces almost half of the worlds e-waste but only recycles about 10% of it. Figure 22-4 INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT  We can manage the solid wastes we produce and reduce or prevent their production. Figure 22-5 Solutions: Reducing Solid Waste  Refuse: to buy items/


Waste Determination Michael Gage New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection County Environmental and Waste Enforcement Special Investigations and.

(commencing on January 1) - the amount of material that is recycled, or transferred to a different site for recycling, equals at least 75 percent by weight or volume of the amount of that material accumulated at the beginning of the period. Is The Material Discarded by Being Recycled? As per 261.2(c) Materials are solid waste if they are inherently waste-like. Hazardous Waste Numbers F020, F021, F022, F023, F026/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 21. Rapidly Growing E-Waste from Discarded Computers and Other Electronics.

is left. We Can Burn or Bury Solid Waste or Produce Less of It  Waste Management Reduce the environmental impact of MSW without seriously trying to reduce the amount of waste produced  Waste Reduction Less waste and pollution are produced as well as reuse, recycle, and composting programs  Integrated waste management Uses a variety of strategies for both waste reduction and waste management Solutions: Reducing Solid Waste  Refuse: to buy items that we really don’t/


Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Benjamin Cummings Lesson #11 Approaches to Waste Management & Municipal Solid Waste.

(5:18) Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Benjamin Cummings Lesson #13 Field Trip: Bath Area Landfill The mission of the Bath Division of Solid Waste & Recycling is to serve residents and businesses of the City by creating the highest quality solid waste and recycling solutions by managing the City’s collection, landfill, and transfer operations using economical, environmentally sound, and customer friendly methods. Copyright © 2008 Pearson/


Solid and Hazardous Waste

soil What is pay-as-you-throw? charges for garbage collection depends on amount of waste being disposed of charges for garbage collection depends on amount of waste being disposed of materials separated out for recycling are hauled away free materials separated out for recycling are hauled away free What is centralized recycling of solid waste? process by which solid waste is collected in one centralized location (MRF or materials-recovery facility) At this/


Solid and Hazardous Wastes In nature, there is essentially no wastes because the wastes of one organism become the nutrients for another. This recycling.

.5 pounds of MSW per day. Recycling is helping since 1990 the MSW per person has leveled off. Continued Food waste is the second largest component of discarded waste. It takes 3 to 12 months to produce compost, depending on the type of waste. The average American college student produces about 640 pounds of solid waste each year, including hundreds of disposable cups. Half of the waste is paper. The biggest source of solid waste in/


17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT Chapter 21 Solid and Hazardous Waste.

Can Burn or Bury Solid Waste or Produce Less of It Waste Management Attempt to control waste in ways that reduce harm, but not amounts…_______________ control Waste Reduction Use less and focus on reuse, recycle, compost Most experts call for using a variety of coordinated strategies for both waste disposal and waste reduction…called ____________________________ output integrated waste management We Can Cut Solid Wastes by Reducing, Reusing, and Recycling (1) Waste reduction is based/


17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT Chapter 21 Solid and Hazardous Waste.

. 21-9, p. 565 There Are Two Types of Recycling (1) Primary, closed-loop recycling Materials recycled into same type: aluminum cans Secondary recycling Materials converted to other products: tires Types of wastes that can be recycled Preconsumer: internal waste Postconsumer: external waste There Are Two Types of Recycling (2) Do items actually get recycled? What are the numbers? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling (1) Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs) Can encourage/


Award of Invitation for Bid Y8-139-PD Residential Solid Waste and Recycling Collection Services Utilities Department Solid Waste Division February 26,

‣ Approximately 39.5 million collection events ‣ Approximately 3,200 total complaints ‣ Complaint rate of 0.008101% –2008 MSTU - $167.57 per household per year Current Service Residential Solid Waste and Recycling Collection Services –High level of service –Current service is very good –Low complaint rate –Low cost Current Service Residential Solid Waste and Recycling Collection Services Bid Options – Manual 2-1-1 Collection – Automated 2-1-1 Collection/


RECYCLING RESOURCES ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ACT HB 07-1288 & HB 07 -182 SWANA TRAINING July 25 2007.

4.Possible 2007 Legislation (and regulatory changes) Workload Increases/Efficiencies 2006 Solid Waste Facilities Landfills Transfer Stations Surface Impoundments Composting Recycling Incinerators Remediation Reviews & Facilities vs. FTE Reviews & Inspections vs. FTE/ role now Set environmental protection standards and/or performance criteria for the design and operation of solid waste disposal facilities (regulations) Ensure compliance with those standards and criteria Design/Report reviews Inspections//


Www.gmaonline.org Packaging & Sustainable Waste Management Meghan Stasz Senior Director, Sustainability Grocery Manufacturers Association.

EPR is not an effective solution 4.What Next? www.gmaonline.org Solid Waste in the U.S. Organic Waste Largest Percentage of Landfills: 2010 Landfill Composition www.gmaonline.org Solid Waste in the U.S. U.S. Recycling Rates of Packaging Source: US EPA 2010 MSW Report, 2009 data (last reporting year) www.gmaonline.org Solid Waste in the U.S. Landfilling is Decreasing Source: US EPA 2010 Municipal/


The average American creates about 4.4 lbs of trash per day. There are about 308 million Americans. That is 1.4 billion lbs per day! Enough to cover 1.

much do we produce? How can we produce less solid waste? How can we produce less solid waste? What are the advantages and disadvantages of reusing recycled materials? What are the advantages and disadvantages of reusing recycled materials? What are the advantages and disadvantages of burning or burying solid waste? What are the advantages and disadvantages of burning or burying solid waste? What is hazardous waste and how can we deal with it? What is/


Chapter 24 Solid and Hazardous Waste. Chapter Overview Questions  What is solid waste and how much do we produce?  How can we produce less solid waste?

response system, access “JoinIn Clicker Content” from the PowerLecture main menu for Living in the Environment.  Should we place much greater emphasis on recycling with the goal of recycling at least 60% of the municipal solid waste that we produce? a. No. Recycling programs should be market driven rather than setting unrealistically high goals that will either fail or require support from already overtaxed citizens. a. No/


Solid and Hazardous Wastes In nature, there is essentially no wastes because the wastes of one organism become the nutrients for another. This recycling.

, is the principal federal law in the United States governing the disposal of solid waste and hazardous waste Goals of RCRA: 1. Protecting human health and the natural environment from the potential hazards of waste disposal. 2. Energy conservation and natural resources. 3. Reducing the amount of waste generated, through source reduction and recycling 4. Ensuring the management of waste in an environmentally sound manner. It is now most widely known for/


Solid Waste Reduction & Recycling Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) Li Guan Advisor: Anna Arkin.

by the state and some counties Approach to waste analysis Track down waste streams Conduct visual estimation of trash composition Identify opportunities to increase waste reduction, reuse, and recycling 2013 Agency Recycling Rates AgencyRecycling ratePopulation DHS54%970 DLI44%375 DNR52%645 MPCA52%668 Mandated recycling rate60% Visual estimation of trash composition Solid waste reduction options Improve / launch organics recycling program Improve recycling program Offer reusables at cafeteria Reuse office/


Solid Waste & Recycling. WASTE Solid waste: any unwanted or discarded material we produce that is not a liquid or gas. Types: ◦ Municipal solid waste.

Recycling Recycling: Organic wastes Comprises over 1/2 of the solid waste Includes yard debris, wood materials, bio- solids, food, manure and agricultural residues, land clearing debris, used paper, and mixed municipal organic waste. Organic materials have been dumped in landfills or burned. Why not recycle them? Recycling: Benefits Recycling saves land, reduces the amount of solid waste, energy consumption and pollution. Ex. recycling one aluminum can saves the energy of about 6 oz. of gasoline. Recycling/


Chapter 19 Waste. What is solid waste.. Where does your trash go when you throw it away? Where does your trash go when you throw it away? Where are our.

increase in the demand for these products –Terracycle -demand encourages manufacturers to build facilities to make recycled products -demand encourages manufacturers to build facilities to make recycled products Composting -yard waste makes up more than 15% of a community’s solid waste -yard waste makes up more than 15% of a community’s solid waste -none of this should go to a landfill because it is biodegradable but it does -none/


Northeast Missouri Solid Waste Management District – Region “C” Department of Natural Resources Grant Project: Earth Friendly Outdoor Classroom Recycling.

increasing in size Amount of waste Recycled In 2007 99% of lead acid batteries were recycled, 54% of paper and paperboard were recycled, 64% of yard trimmings are recycled and 35% of metals were recycled In 2007 I n the US 85 million tons of 254 million tons of municipal solid waste was recycled (Recycling Facts. Org) In 2000 13,500 aluminum cans were recycled every minute in California Recycled Savings In 2007 the amount of recycling saved energy equal to/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 21. Core Case Study: E-waste—An Exploding Problem (1)  Electronic waste, e-waste: fastest growing solid waste problem.

-2 How Should We Deal with Solid Waste?  Concept 21-2 A sustainable approach to solid waste is first to reduce it, then to reuse or recycle it, and finally to safely dispose of what is left. We Can Burn or Bury Solid Waste or Produce Less of It  Waste Management  reduce environmental impacts  Waste Reduction  Reduce waste – reuse – recycle - compost  Integrated waste management Uses a variety of strategies Integrated Waste Management Fig. 21-5, p/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 16. Three big ideas The order of priorities for dealing with solid waste should be to produce less of it, reuse, and.

take back various discarded consumer products, such as electronic equipment, appliances, and motor vehicles. You can save resources by reducing your output of solid waste and pollution WHY IS REUSING AND RECYCLING MATERIALS SO IMPORTANT? Section 16-3 Reuse is an important way to reduce solid waste and pollution, and to save money Increasingly substituted throwaway items for reusable ones, which has resulted in growing masses/


© 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. CHAPTER 21 Municipal Solid Waste: Disposal and Recovery.

governments used to manage all MSW Federal and state agencies now regulate, encourage, and facilitate waste management Solid Waste Disposal Act (1965): gave the Bureau of Solid Waste Management jurisdiction over MSW Financial and technical, not regulatory Resource and Recovery Act (1970): gave the EPA jurisdiction over waste management Directs attention to recycling programs Encouraged states to develop management programs © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. More federal legislation Resource/


Environmental Science A Study of Interrelationships Chapter 17 Solid Waste Management and Disposal.

most from all materials they use. Any activities that reduce the amount of waste produced, reduce the: –Cost of waste disposal –Amount of raw materials needed –Amount of pollution generated 17.3 Methods of Waste Disposal  Recycling is one of the best environmental success stories of the late 20 th century.  In the United States, recycling (including composting) diverted about 30% of solid waste stream from landfills and incinerators in 2007. Benefits: –Resource conservation –Pollution/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 21. Core Case Study: E-waste—An Exploding Problem (1)  Electronic waste, e-waste: fastest growing solid waste problem.

) What Can You Do? Reuse There Are Two Types of Recycling (1)  Primary, closed-loop recycling  Secondary recycling  Types of wastes that can be recycled Preconsumer: internal waste Postconsumer: external waste There Are Two Types of Recycling (2)  Do items actually get recycled?  What are the numbers?  Will the consumer buy recycled goods? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling  Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs)  Source separation Pay-as-you-throw Fee-per-bag/


Office of Financial Responsibility and Data Management SWIA.

: News Feeds: http://www.deq.virginia.gov/ConnectWithDEQ/New sFeeds.aspx – PLANNED: Work Group on Risk Communication Solid Waste Planning:  DONE: Periodic Review of Solid Waste Planning Regs Session with SVSWMA, NVWMB Next session is with CVWMA  PLANNED: Targeted Planning Sessions Around State Revisions to the Regulations Recycling and Solid Waste Management Tracking in Virginia Bland Buchanan Dickenson Grayson Lee Russell Scott Smyth Tazewell Washington Abingdon Wise Wythe/


APES Friday, January 30 th Reminders: APES Exam: Monday, May 4 th at 8:00am Today’s Schedule: Pick up Unit 9: Waste Vocab if didn’t yesterday Start Unit.

take 400-1,000 years to break down Solid Waste  Options for solid waste:  1. Waste management:  Attempt to control wastes in ways that reduce environmental harm, but don’t reduce amount of waste produced  2. Waste reduction:  Produce less waste & pollution  Includes reduce, reuse, & recycle programs Solid Waste Options for solid waste: 3. Integrated Waste Management: use a variety of strategies for waste disposal & reduction oEstimated that 75-90% of waste could be eliminated with these strategies/


DISCLAIMER Notice: This presentation has been provided as part of a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency webinar. The document does not constitute EPA.

: Definition of Solid Waste and Recycling (PDF) Definition of Solid Waste and Hazardous Waste Recycling (PDF) (23 pp, 69K) — Provides an overview of definition of solid waste and hazardous waste recycling regulation under RCRA. Definition of Solid Waste and Hazardous Waste Recycling (PDF) Solid and Hazardous Waste Exclusions (PDF) (29 pp, 87K) — Provides an overview of exclusions from the definition of solid waste and exclusions from the Definition of Hazardous Waste. Solid and Hazardous Waste Exclusions/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 24. Outline 1. Waste in Modern Society solid waste, hazardous waste 2. Reducing and Reusing Waste options, refillable.

, they discourage reuse and waste reduction. Recycling How plastics are made Managing Waste Managing waste involves difficult choices: detoxification of hazardous waste converts waste into less hazardous or non–hazardous materials; burning solid and hazardous waste reduces the quantity of waste (used for 15% of solid waste in U.S.), but contributes to air pollution and regulation can be difficult; land disposal of solid and hazardous waste involves burial or impoundment (used for 57% of solid waste in U.S/


TODAY 5-3  Opener: Describe source reduction, and the methods of source reduction.  Turn in homework, openers, and Ch. 17 notes.  Take out paper, pencil,

the most from all materials they use. Any activities that reduce the amount of waste produced, reduce the: ○ Cost of waste disposal ○ Amount of raw materials needed ○ Amount of pollution generated Methods of Waste Disposal  Recycling is one of the best environmental success stories of the late 20 th century.  In the United States, recycling (including composting) diverted about 30% of solid waste stream from landfills and incinerators in 2007. Benefits: ○ Resource conservation ○ Pollution reduction/


17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT Chapter 21 Solid and Hazardous Waste.

. 21-9, p. 565 There Are Two Types of Recycling (1) Primary, closed-loop recycling Materials recycled into same type: aluminum cans Secondary recycling Materials converted to other products: tires Types of wastes that can be recycled Preconsumer: internal waste Postconsumer: external waste There Are Two Types of Recycling (2) Do items actually get recycled? What are the numbers? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling (1) Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs) Can encourage/


Waste Management. Core Case Study: E-waste—An Exploding Problem Electronic waste, e-waste: fastest growing solid waste problem Most ends up in landfills.

. 21-9, p. 565 There Are Two Types of Recycling Primary, closed-loop recycling Materials recycled into same type: aluminum cans Secondary recycling Materials converted to other products: tires Types of wastes that can be recycled Preconsumer: internal waste Postconsumer: external waste There Are Two Types of Recycling Do items actually get recycled? What are the numbers? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs) Can encourage increased trash production/


17 TH MILLER/SPOOLMAN LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT Chapter 21 Solid and Hazardous Waste.

. 21-9, p. 565 There Are Two Types of Recycling (1) Primary, closed-loop recycling Materials recycled into same type: aluminum cans Secondary recycling Materials converted to other products: tires Types of wastes that can be recycled Preconsumer: internal waste Postconsumer: external waste There Are Two Types of Recycling (2) Do items actually get recycled? What are the numbers? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling (1) Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs) Can encourage/


Waste and Recycling Notes Waste Disposal Read Miller, Ch. 21.

materials have been dumped in landfills or burned. Why not use them! General Purpose Recycling saves land, reduces the amount of solid waste, energy consumption and pollution. Ex. recycling one aluminum can saves the energy of about 6 oz. of gasoline. Examples Gold, lead, nickel, steel, copper, silver, zinc, and aluminum are recyclable. Problems Recycling does have environmental costs. It uses energy and generates pollution. Ex. the de-inking/


Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Enger & Smith Environmental Science A Study of Interrelationships.

the most from all materials they use. Any activities that reduce the amount of waste produced, reduce the: –Cost of waste disposal. –Amount of raw materials needed. –Amount of pollution generated. Methods of Waste Disposal  Recycling is one of the best environmental success stories of the late 20 th century.  In the United States, recycling (including composting) diverted about 30% of solid waste stream from landfills and incinerators in 2001. Benefits: –Resource conservation –Pollution reduction/


Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 21. Core Case Study: E-waste—An Exploding Problem (1)  Electronic waste, e-waste: fastest growing solid waste problem.

Consumption Involved with Using Different Types of 350 ml Containers There Are Two Types of Recycling (1)  Primary, closed-loop recycling  Secondary recycling  Types of wastes that can be recycled Preconsumer: internal waste Postconsumer: external waste There Are Two Types of Recycling (2)  Do items actually get recycled?  What are the numbers?  Will the consumer buy recycled goods? We Can Mix or Separate Household Solid Wastes for Recycling  Materials-recovery facilities (MRFs)  Source separation/


Ads by Google