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File Management Photos (left to right): © Norebbo, Shutterstock.com; © Mario Lopes, Shutterstock.com.

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Presentation on theme: "File Management Photos (left to right): © Norebbo, Shutterstock.com; © Mario Lopes, Shutterstock.com."— Presentation transcript:

1 File Management Photos (left to right): © Norebbo, Shutterstock.com; © Mario Lopes, Shutterstock.com

2 This lesson will cover:
How to organize files and folders. Backing up your working files. Creating and editing shortcuts. Functional Skills: This presentation covers the following Functional Skills standard: Use ICT Systems Level – manage files and folder structures to enable efficient information retrieval. © Boardworks Ltd 2008

3 What advantages do folders provide?
Why do we use folders? Computer data is commonly stored as files which can be organized into folders. Teacher’s notes: Naming files sensibly and organizing them into folders makes it easier and quicker to access the right data. It also allows old files (archives) to be stored separately from current files (working files). Data organization makes data retrieval easier and also improves the experience of finding data for multiple users. What advantages do folders provide?

4 Naming files and saving work
Whenever you save a document or file you will need to give it a file name. Sensible file names will make it easier to retrieve data. Calling something “Document1” does not distinguish it from any other files and makes it harder to find. When working on a big project, you will also find it helpful to use sequential file names. For example, the first file could be saved as Project_vsn1.doc, and the second as Project_vsn2.doc. Teacher’s notes: You may wish to remind students that forgetting to save is one of the biggest causes of data loss. They should get into the habit of saving their work every minutes or after any significant changes. Pressing Ctrl + S is a quick way to save in most programs. Saving with sequential filenames is useful because it means that there will be another version should the working file be corrupted. If the entire project is saved in one file and that file is corrupted, then all of the work will be lost. Why do you think this is helpful?

5 Organizing folders Folders are named whenever you create them.
Sometimes you may need folders within a folder. For example, if you have a folder called ‘music’ containing all your MP3s, you might also want to have folders within this to divide the MP3s into different albums or artists. Teacher’s notes: You may wish to refresh students on how to create new folders at this point (right-click in a window or on the desktop, select “New” from the menu, and then “Folder”). Image: Microsoft product screen shots reprinted with permission from Microsoft Corporation. These are known as subfolders.

6 Deleting, copying and moving files
Teacher’s note: You may wish to point out to students that when renaming files, they should be careful not to alter the file extension (the letters after the full stop) or the file may not open. Image: Microsoft product screen shots reprinted with permission from Microsoft Corporation.

7 Opening files from different sources
Most commonly used files are saved to a hard disk. These can be opened simply by double-clicking on them. However, large files from the Internet must be downloaded before they can be opened. Files stored in external storage devices, such as flash drives and CD-ROMs, need to be connected to a computer before they can be opened. Images: © 2010 Stock.xchng; Microsoft product screen shot reprinted with permission from Microsoft Corporation.

8 What does the network manager need to consider when backing up data?
Backing up is important to ensure that data is not lost. It involves making a copy of the files so that the copy can be used if the original is damaged. On a networked system, data is backed up centrally by the network manager. Teacher’s note: Most professionals working on a project will regularly backup all their data onto a CD ROM, flash memory or an external hard drive. Network managers need to decide: what to back up (e.g. just the root folder, or all of the subfolders) how often to back up (this should be done regularly, after each major task) where to store the data. Good locations to save back up folders are: a CD ROM (do this by going to My Computer, open the CD folder, drag the backup file into here and click Write these files to CD). a floppy disk a flash memory device an external hard drive or if you are working on a network, a different network drive. Photo: © 2010 Photos.com What does the network manager need to consider when backing up data?

9 Backing up Teacher’s notes: At this point, you may wish to refresh students on how to handle and store media properly, to reduce the likelihood of losing data. To handle and store media correctly: Ensure you have a sensible folder structure. If using flash memory, CD ROMs or other external storage devices, keep them in a case where they cannot be damaged. Store your data where you can access it easily, but other users cannot (for example, on a password protected network). Storage media, like hard drives and CD-ROMs, need to be kept away from magnetic fields, solvents, high temperatures, and other elements that cause damage.

10 Restoring files If something does go wrong with any files or folders you will need to restore them. For this to work well, you must back up all your data regularly. Making only one backup means you can still lose lots of data. To restore a file that has been corrupted: delete or rename the corrupted file access the backup version from the backup folder copy and paste it into the correct folder in the working files. Teacher’s notes: Sometimes it can be best to rename a corrupted file; this is because someone with the correct software may still be able to recover data from a corrupted file. Some school networks may not allow students to access the recycle bin. However, they should still be able to find and recover their files by speaking to the school’s IT administrator. Microsoft product screen shots reprinted with permission from Microsoft Corporation Similarly, deleted files can usually be restored by clicking on the file in the Recycle Bin, and selecting “Restore this item”. The file will then reappear in its original place.

11 Do you know how to create a shortcut?
What is a shortcut? Computer shortcuts, as the name suggests, provide a quicker route to getting where you want to be. They help you to avoid long, complicated searches through various folder levels. Instead, shortcuts take you directly to your chosen file, folder or application in one quick move. Do you know how to create a shortcut?

12 Creating shortcuts Teacher’s notes: After showing students how to create a shortcut, you may wish to ask them if they know how to delete a shortcut. This done in the same way as deleting a file (right click on the shortcut and select delete from the menu, or drag the shortcut to the recycle bin). Students should also be aware that changing the location of files may stop shortcuts from working. They should keep shortcuts up-to-date and delete any that are obsolete. Image: Microsoft product screen shots reprinted with permission from Microsoft Corporation.

13 Editing shortcuts Image: Microsoft product screen shots reprinted with permission from Microsoft Corporation.

14 Summary quiz


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