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Combining Sentences. Agenda Why Combine Sentences? Subjects, Verbs, and Objects Transitions Dependent and Independent Coordination Subordination Participial.

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Presentation on theme: "Combining Sentences. Agenda Why Combine Sentences? Subjects, Verbs, and Objects Transitions Dependent and Independent Coordination Subordination Participial."— Presentation transcript:

1 Combining Sentences

2 Agenda Why Combine Sentences? Subjects, Verbs, and Objects Transitions Dependent and Independent Coordination Subordination Participial Phrases

3 Why Combine Sentences? A document containing sentences of one short pattern bores both the writer and the reader for two reasons: 1. Repetition of a single, simple sentence pattern draws attention to itself, not to the ideas. 2. Simple, short sentences cannot show the reader the many relationships that exist among ideas of different importance.

4 Subjects, Verbs, and Objects Do adjacent sentences contain the same subject and/or the same verb or object? Combine two or more sentences in a single, concise sentence by omitting a repeated subject and/or verb or object. 1.Relays are quite common in home appliances. 2.Relays are also common in cars, where the 12V supply voltage means that just about everything needs a large amount of current. Relays are quite common in home appliances and also in cars, where the 12V supply voltage means that just about everything needs a large amount of current.

5 Subjects, Verbs, and Objects Do adjacent sentences contain the same subject and/or the same verb or object? Join the sentences by omitting repeated subjects and/or verbs or objects and by using adjectives. 1.The group focuses on building a new relay. 2.The new relay is more efficient than the old one. 3.The new relay is also faster than the old one. The group focuses on building a new, faster, and more efficient relay.

6 Transitions Join the sentences by using a semicolon with a transitional word and a comma. However--The actress's performance electrified the audience; however, lighting and sound problems diminished the play's overall impact. Furthermore--The project required extensive research; furthermore, budget cuts reduced the available funds. Instead--Neither bold colors nor heavy lines made the graphic striking; instead, the sheer size of the architecture drew attention. Consequently--The meeting required preparation and an in-depth analysis of the situation; consequently, the leader surveyed the employees on the issue. Nevertheless--The recently established bio-social theory helps us see the evolution of human behavior with a new perspective; nevertheless, few scientists endorse it.

7 Dependent and Independent Clauses Independent Clauses are a sentence in themselves. Dependent Clauses are no full sentence. They usually start with a transition word. Independent Clause I can solve this problem. Dependent Clause She asked me to help because I can solve this problem.

8 Coordination coordinating two independent clauses  Do adjacent sentences contain ideas of equal importance?  Join the sentences with a coordinating conjunction preceded by a comma. 1.The electromagnet is energized. 2.The armature completes the second circuit. The electromagnet is energized, and the armature completes the second circuit. The electromagnet is energized, so the armature completes the second circuit.

9 Coordinating Conjunctions ConjunctionUsageExample For Cause & Effect  Coping with environmental issues is a necessary part of industrial studies, for industries affect the environment. And similar ideas  The strike divided the town, and it strained labor-management relations. Nor Alternatives  The environment cannot sustain constant resource depletion, nor can it recover quickly from wide-scale resource extraction.

10 Coordinating Conjunctions ConjunctionUsageExample But opposite ideas  Negotiators resolved the strike, but the town remained divided. OrOr Alternatives  Businesses can design their own programs for recording statistical data, or they can use purchased, pre- designed programs. Yet Contrasting ideas  More secondary schools are implementing programs designed to increase teenagers' awareness of the dangers of drinking and driving, yet alcohol-related traffic accidents continue to be one of the leading causes of death for people between the ages of fifteen and twenty-two. SoSo Cause & Effect  Industries affect the environment, so coping with environmental issues is a necessary part of industrial studies.

11 Subordination subordinating one clause to another  Establishes a weight differential between two parts of the sentence  shows that the lesser idea depends on the stronger idea (chronological development, a cause-and-effect relationship, a conditional relationship, etc. ) Independent clause Dependent clause

12 Subordinating Conjunctions ConjunctionUsageExample when, whenever, until, after, before Time  When the electromagnet is energized, the armature completes the second circuit and the light is on. where, whereeverPlace  Relays are quite common in appliances where there is an electronic control turning on something like a motor or a light because, since, so that Cause/Effect  The environment cannot sustain constant resource depletion because it cannot recover quickly from wide-scale resource extraction. if, unless, if onlyCondition  If the electromagnet is not energized, the spring pulls the armature away and the circuit is not complete. although, even though Contrast  Although equipment failures and labor strikes delayed the submarine's completion, naval engineers continued the project.

13 Participial Phrases Connecting two sentences  integrate an idea into a larger structure by turning that idea into a modifying phrase 1.The engineer was undaunted by the first results of the benchmark test. 2.He improved the performance of the circuit. 3.He led his team toward success. Undaunted by the first results of the benchmark test, the engineer improved the performance of the circuit and led his team toward success.

14 For an example, please refer to http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/relay2.htm For more information, please consult http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/style/sentencev.html Example and More Information

15 Conbining Sentences: Quiz Please take the Combining Sentences Quiz on WebCT now.


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