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© Boardworks Ltd 2004 1 of 22 Reading Journals This icon indicates that detailed teacher’s notes are available in the Notes Page. For more detailed instructions,

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Presentation on theme: "© Boardworks Ltd 2004 1 of 22 Reading Journals This icon indicates that detailed teacher’s notes are available in the Notes Page. For more detailed instructions,"— Presentation transcript:

1 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 1 of 22 Reading Journals This icon indicates that detailed teacher’s notes are available in the Notes Page. For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation. This icon indicates the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable.

2 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 2 of 22 Reading journals Have you ever written a diary? If you have, have you ever written about books in this diary? A good way to help you to understand and enjoy books more is to keep a reading journal. Can you guess what you might use a reading journal for?

3 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 3 of 22 Your reading journal will become a very personal document. The first thing you need to do is to design an exciting and individual front cover using words and pictures. Your reading journal

4 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 4 of 22 A reading journal is your chance to write about the book you are reading and describe the things that strike you while you are reading it. A wide variety of details can be collected in your reading journals. What sort of information might be included in a reading journal? Your reading journal

5 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 5 of 22 Could any of the things below be included in your reading journal? Dreams you have had at night which you would like to remember. Ideas you get from reading which you would like to use in your writing. Characters from a novel you are reading who make you laugh. Quotations you like from films or television programs. A few words which describe your feelings for something you have read. Using your reading journal

6 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 6 of 22 Plot – What is the main conflict? Narrative structure – How does the story move? Point of view – Who tells the story? Characterization – Who is in the story? Setting – Where does the action take place? Using your reading journal You will need to use your reading journal to make notes on: However, when you use a reading journal, you should not write as though you are answering questions from a text book but as though you are chatting to a friend about your reading, just as you would chat about a film you have seen. You can use your journal to make notes on private reading as well as class readers.

7 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 7 of 22 To begin with, you will need to jot down a few basics in your reading journal. Getting started Book title…...........................Date started…………………. Author………………………… Date finished……………….. Type of book…...................... Recommended by…………... Names of main characters………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………….. Story so far…………………………………………………….........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

8 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 8 of 22 The most important aspect of your reading journal is honesty. Try to explore your own personal thoughts and feelings about a text. Include statements such as "I liked/disliked the first chapter because...” Only once you have responded personally can you reflect on why you are reacting in the way you are. Personal reactions What are you currently reading? What are your feelings about your reading? I am reading Kit’s Wilderness. So far I am really enjoying it even though it’s a bit confusing. My favourite character is Allie. She reminds me of my cousin who lives in Wales!

9 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 9 of 22 Split a page of your reading journal into two halves. On one half, write your individual response to your class reader. Swap with a partner and allow them to respond to your comments. I hated the opening. It reminded me of a film I saw which nearly scared me to death. I prefer books which are happier and where characters do funny things. I disagree. Claire is a really funny character because she isn’t scared of anything even though most normal people would be terrified! Happier books are boring. At least this is interesting. Personal reactions

10 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 10 of 22 Even if you understand a text you are reading, many questions can enter your head as you read. These questions can be simple such as: where is the story set? A question could also be more abstract such as: how would the main character cope studying at my school? Questions What questions would you like to be answered by the text, the author or an individual character in the story? Try to think of at least five questions. Write these questions in your reading journal.

11 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 11 of 22 Plot What is meant by a story’s plot? What is the main conflict? What are the other conflicts? What causes these conflicts? Are all the conflicts resolved? How? When you consider plot, bear in mind the following questions:

12 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 12 of 22 Narrative structure A book’s narrative structure means the way the story is organized. Are the events in chronological order or does the book jump back and forth in time? Are there lots of small parts and chapters or are there no divisions at all? How does the narrative structure affect your enjoyment of the text?

13 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 13 of 22 Point of view What is meant by the story’s point of view? Who narrates the story? From which point of view is the story told? Does it change? How and why? Can you trust the narrator to tell you the truth? What effects does it have on other elements of the story?

14 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 14 of 22 Characterizations Characters can make or break a novel. This means that your views on the characters are very important and you should consider them carefully. What attracts you to a character and makes you enjoy reading about them? Who are your favourite novel characters?

15 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 15 of 22 Who is your favourite character in the book you are reading? Draw this character as you imagine they look and add words and phrases to describe them. Wizard who can do some magic Clever Generous and caring Sporty Beats his enemies Characterizations

16 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 16 of 22 Setting What is meant by the story’s setting? Imagine you are transported into the story you are reading for a whole day. Would you enjoy being there? Why or why not? What would you do while you were there? Write a diary entry to explain your feelings and adventures of the day.

17 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 17 of 22 Daily entries Here are some questions for you to think about and make notes on each time you read: 1.Have you enjoyed reading today? Why or why not? 2.Have you learned anything new about a character or situation? 3.Have you changed your opinion on any character? 4.What do you expect will happen next in the story? 5.What would you like to see happen next in the story? 6.Do you feel a desire to read on? Why or why not?

18 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 18 of 22 Finishing a book When you finish with a book, it is a good idea to make final comments on the text and try to draw conclusions about the story you have read. This can be helpful when you are making recommendations to others and also for your own personal satisfaction. Your reading journal can help you record all the great (and not so great) books you have read or given up on!

19 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 19 of 22 Draw a book map which would help to direct others around the book you’ve just read. It will also help you to remember the book. Here is the start of a book map for Northern Lights. Book map We meet Lyra in Oxford Adventures around the colleges Lyra finds Roger You might decide to use pictures instead of words.

20 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 20 of 22 Book map

21 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 21 of 22 Final questions 1.Was the book too long, too short, or just right? 2. Have you read other books by this author? How does the book you're reading compare to his/her other works? Are there any questions you would like to ask the author? 3. How did the book make you feel? Did the book teach you anything? 4. What were the best and worst features of the book? 5. Would you recommend this book to someone else? Why or why not? Who might enjoy reading this book?

22 © Boardworks Ltd 2004 22 of 22 And finally…


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