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© Boardworks Ltd 2005 1 of 17 These icons indicate that teacher’s notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates that.

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Presentation on theme: "© Boardworks Ltd 2005 1 of 17 These icons indicate that teacher’s notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates that."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 1 of 17 These icons indicate that teacher’s notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates that the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable. For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation. © Boardworks Ltd 2005 1 of 17 Textiles Decorating Textiles

2 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 2 of 17 Learning objectives © Boardworks Ltd 2005 2 of 17 Learning objectives To understand the many ways in which a textile product can be decorated, and to be able to decorate a textile product using techniques including: dyeing, painting and printing the fabric transfer crayons appliqué beading and sequins hand embroidery CAD/CAM embroidery patchwork quilting.

3 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 3 of 17 Cotton is a good choice if you want to dye your fabric. Man-made fibres do not usually dye as well as natural fibres. You can buy dyes that work in the washing machine or ones that work in cold water. If you hang the bottom of a T-shirt in a bath of dye, the dye creeps up the fabric to give a pattern which fades out. You can tie-dye by tying the fabric up so that the dye doesn’t reach some parts of it. Dyes will mix to give new colours, just like paint. Fabric can be dyed before or after it is made into a garment or other item. Dyeing

4 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 4 of 17 Batik involves painting the fabric with wax using a tjanting tool. Wax is applied as a resist, where the colour is not wanted. The fabric is then dyed or painted, and the colour takes where the wax is not present. The wax is then removed by hot water or a hot iron, depending on the dye or paint used. The process can be repeated for other colours. Batik

5 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 5 of 17 Screen printing uses a piece of fine fabric stretched across a frame. The process is outlined below: Copy your design onto transparent film – block off areas you don’t want to dye with a stencil or special paste. Put a piece of board under the fabric where you want to print. Spread ink across the screen with a wiper and transfer it to the fabric. Let the ink dry and then iron it to set it. Transfer designs

6 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 6 of 17 There are a number of ways that a design can be transferred onto fabric. One way is with transfer crayons: Transfer crayons look like normal wax crayons. However, when heated they bond to the fabric. An image is drawn onto greaseproof paper and then ironed onto a piece of fabric. This process creates a mirror image, so consider this if you are applying text. Transfer designs You can use a resist to protect areas you don’t want coloured.

7 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 7 of 17 Transfer paper is a rough paper that is used with a printer. An image is produced using CAD (computer aided design) and printed out onto the transfer paper. This image is then ironed face down onto the fabric. When it is cool, you are able to remove the backing paper. Transfer designs

8 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 8 of 17 Dylon Image Maker allows you to add images and photographs to fabrics. The process is outlined below: Photocopy your image. Spread the image maker over the design. Turn the paper (image maker down) onto your fabric and leave for a number of hours. Wet the paper, rub off and apply a sealing coat. Transfer designs

9 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 9 of 17 Appliqué is a popular method of decoration, used on garments, soft furnishing and toys. Pieces of fabric are stitched onto a larger piece of fabric to create a design. The stitches can be applied to the item using hand or machine stitching. School badges are a common example of appliqué. Appliqué

10 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 10 of 17 Beads and sequins can be used along with embroidery to decorate a variety of garments and other textile items. Adding beads and sequins can be time consuming, as they are usually stitched on by hand. Beads and sequins can also be stuck to the fabric using glue. A lot of ethnic garments and accessories are decorated in this way. What other looks do you associate beads and sequins with? Why do you think this is? Beading and sequins

11 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 11 of 17 Embroidery

12 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 12 of 17 The memory card is inserted into the embroidery machine. The image is then downloaded onto the machine’s memory and output onto the machine bed, creating a machined logo or image. Machine embroidery Embroidery machines can be used to embroider images designed using computer software. Alternatively, a design can be copied using a scanner.

13 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 13 of 17 Patchwork This is when small pieces of fabric are sewn together to create a large pattern. This can then be made into a textile item. The most common use is quilting. Quilts can take months to make and can be extremely intricate. Most patchwork pieces are hexagonal, but other shapes are used too. Different shapes can be sewn together using a zigzag or decorative machine stitch. Patchwork

14 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 14 of 17 Quilting is achieved by sewing a number of layers of fabric together. The best known type of quilting is English or padded quilting, made from three layers of fabric. A wadding is placed between two pieces of fabric to create a 3D effect. There are many uses for quilting – bed and cot covers, garments, baby clothing, accessories and many more. Quilting

15 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 15 of 17 What can you remember?

16 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 16 of 17 Anagrams

17 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 17 of 17 Key points © Boardworks Ltd 2005 17 of 17 Key points Dyeing fabric can produce decorative results. The whole garment can be coloured, or sections tie- or dip-dyed. Designs can be transferred to fabric using screen printing, transfer crayons, transfer paper or Dylon Image Maker. Appliqué can either be hand or machine-sewed onto fabric. Beads and sequins can be sewn or glued onto fabric. Embroidery can be done by hand or using CAD/CAM. Patchwork is made by sewing small pieces of fabric together. Quilting is made by sewing layers of fabric together.


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