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Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing.

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Presentation on theme: "Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing."— Presentation transcript:

1 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

2 Welcome from Commissioner Holliday

3 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

4 Who are we? How far is your home from this facility? Less than 1 hour
More than 1 hour About an hour Ask participants to sort themselves according to the criteria on the screen. Explain they will have to talk to others to determine who they are and determine where the group will gather. When the group has gathered, share individual responses to the question. Regroup when next question is displayed.

5 Who are we? Which job title describes how you spend the majority of your time? Classroom teacher Central office personnel Coach/resource teacher/lead teacher/etc. other

6 Who are we? What is the first letter of the county in which you work?
A to F G to H I to R S to Z

7 Who are we? When did you begin your teaching career? Before 1980
1980 to 1990 1991 to 2001 After 2001

8 AGENDA Introductions Mathematics Leadership Network Overview
Establishing Group Norms Common Core State Standards Overview Characteristics of Highly Effective Teaching & Learning Assessment Literacy Blackboard Reflection & Closure

9 Announcements Facility Issues Breaks/Lunch Hand Signal Name Tags

10 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

11 Warming Up You and your “match” will discuss our warm-up question.
At the signal, your pair will form a “square” with the nearest pair to continue discussing and sharing opinions and ideas. Jot down your thoughts onto the index card provided.

12 Pairs Squared Responses
Choose at least one of the four areas below and write down what you would like to learn within your chosen area(s). With your pair, and then square, discuss your response(s). ASSESSMENT LITERACY COMMON CORE STANDARDS HIGHLY EFFECTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING LEADERSHIP ?

13 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

14 Kentucky Leadership Networks
Why are we here? Why am I here?

15 Big Picture Learning Targets
I can clearly articulate the vision and goals of the leadership networks. I can explain how the networks will work together to improve teaching and learning. I can identify and describe the four components of the leadership networks’ work. I can articulate my role in the leadership network.

16 Big Picture SB 1 Focus on college / career readiness Revise standards
Revise assessment system Collaborate across all groups / levels Improve the effectiveness of teaching and learning

17 Leadership Network Vision
Every school district in the Commonwealth of Kentucky has a knowledgeable and cohesive leadership team that guides the professional learning and practice of all administrators, teachers, and staff so that every student experiences highly effective teaching, learning and assessment practices in every classroom, every day.

18 Content Leadership Network Long Term Goals
Ensure that every participant has a clear understanding of how to translate Kentucky’s Core Academic Standards into clear learning targets in order to design high quality formative and summative assessments and to plan/select rigorous and congruent learning experiences. The network approach is designed to build knowledge and leadership capacity within the district. Districts should utilize the membership of the networks to scale up pd at the local level.

19 OVEC Math Leadership Network
Regional Facilitators: Dr. Bill Bush Dr. Maggie McGatha Kricket McClure Regional Math Content Specialist: Seth Hunter KDE Consultant: Robin Hill District Teacher Leaders

20 District Leadership Teams
Content Teacher-Leaders School/District Leaders Mathematics Leadership Networks- 3 Teacher Leaders per district English Language Arts Leadership Networks-3 Teacher Leaders per district KLA – 3 school level leaders per district Instructional Support Leadership Networks –up to 3 district leaders Superintendent

21 C I A Curriculum / What Kentucky’s Core Academic Standards Instruction / How Characteristics of Highly Effective Teaching and Learning Assessment / How Well Balanced Assessment / Assessment Literacy Kentucky Leadership Networks

22 KY Leadership Networks
Standards no matter how well-written, will NOT, by themselves, improve student achievement and motivation to learn.

23 Standards, Assessments, Highly Effective Teaching and Learning
Standards alone will not change classroom practice. They must be understood and contextualized in effective practice. Standards aren’t written for students. Teachers must be able to transform standards into the classroom level ‘targets’ that students must ‘hit.’

24 Standards, Assessments, Highly Effective Teaching and Learning
Targets allow students to build knowledge/skills/reasoning/products over time to a place where they are ready to demonstrate the proficiency required by the standards. Targets enable teachers to design quality assessments and to plan/select congruent learning experiences.

25 Leadership Networks Student learning is at the core of this work.
Capacity building vs. a “train the trainer” model All stakeholders need to operate from a common understanding of key concepts and ideas related to implementation of Senate Bill 1. Network participants will study the new standards deeply in order to translate them into highly effective instructional and assessment experiences.

26 As a Teacher Leader, your responsibility is to
collaborate with other leaders throughout your region to hone your own practices / knowledge work collaboratively within your district to scale up highly effective practices in every classroom

27 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

28 Setting Group Norms Group norms are agreed upon ways in which we will work together so that productivity is maximized. They are posted and reviewed (verbally and in writing) at all meetings. Let’s work together to set the norms that we will abide by.

29 Group Norms Be present and be engaged in the work
We are all equal partners in this work Seek first to understand, and then to be understood others? Think individually, write down 3 norms that you feel should be included on our list (2 minutes). Share with your team, designate a recorder/synthesizer and share your 3 Norms and come up with a group list. Your group should be prepared to share one Norm that should be considered for our list (5 minutes).

30 Questionnaire and Break
We have about 10 minutes to do a baseline questionnaire, which we will use to inform/ improve our practices. When you are finished, give the questionnaire to Seth and take a 15 break.

31 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

32 Learning Targets: I can explain the development, purpose, and organization of the new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. I can compare and contrast: the Standards for Mathematical Practice with the Standards for Mathematical Content, and the new Common Core State Standards with other state and national standards.

33 Where did the Common Core State Standards come from?
For the first time a group of state associations have decided consistent, common standards would be beneficial to us all. launched by Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center). Parents, teachers, school administrators and experts from across the country together with state leaders, through their membership in the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) are leading the effort to develop a common core of state standards.

34 Support for the Common Core State Standards Initiative
National Education Association ACT, Inc. American Federation of Teachers (AFT) Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) American Statistical Association Coalition for Student Achievement National Association of Secondary School Principals The College Board U.S. Department of Education Council of Administrators of Special Education (CASE) Partnership for 21st Century Skills International Reading Association If you go to the website for the CCSSI you will find a list of many, many organizations that are in support of this initiative. These are just some of those organizations. These organizations and others have statements of support on the website. Alliance for Excellent Education National Parent Teacher Association (PTA) Coalition for a College and Career Ready America (CCCRA) Association of American Colleges and Universities National Council of Teachers of Mathematics National Association of State Boards of Education Achieve

35 The Process - Common Core State Standards Initiative
State-led effort to establish consistent and clear education standards Written by content experts, teachers, researchers and others Nearly 10,000 comments from the public Validation committee reviewed the standards Each state chooses to adopt, NOT led by federal government 23 states have adopted the common core state standards; KY was the first!

36 By what criteria were the standards developed?
Are aligned with college and workforce expectations; Are clear, understandable and consistent; Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through high-order skills; Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards; Are informed by standards in other top performing countries, and Are evidence-based. How Students Learn – National Research Council

37 Introduction to the Common Core: What Does it Mean to Understand?
Jake is a Genius Each person will need 4 post-it notes Silently read pages 3, 4, and 5. Using one post-it note per page, write down your Most Important Points for each page. We are about to begin to explore the new math standards. The introduction provides background on the purpose & vision with the emphasis on understanding. Before we start to explore the standards, let’s take a look at a typical student’s math understanding from our pop culture: Jake is a Genius on youtube from Two and a Half Men

38 Introduction to the Common Core
At your table groups, share your Most Important Points (MIPs) about each page. MIP Let’s have one table share an idea from Intro, another understanding, etc.

39 Standards for Mathematical Practice
Important “processes and proficiencies” and describe varieties of expertise that mathematics educators at all levels should seek to develop in their students (p. 6). the strands of mathematical proficiency specified in Adding It Up: adaptive reasoning strategic competence conceptual understanding procedural fluency productive disposition the NCTM process standards: problem solving reasoning and proof communication representation connections The first standards located in this new document are not the Content Standards. The 8 Mathematical Practices come from two places. The NCTM standards had 5 content & 5 process standards. You can look up references to the process standards in the introduction our Ky core content, but the major emphasis is on the content. The practices are also based on the proficienies from Adding It Up. These new standards seem to integrate the mathematical practices into the content better than what we have had, but it is our job to make sure to stress the importance of teaching the content through these.

40 Standards for Mathematical Practice - pgs 6-8
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Model with mathematics. Use appropriate tools strategically. Attend to precision. Look for and make use of structure. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. These 8 practices more visable throughout this document. A strong focus on these may be part of what we have been lacking in the past. Students being able to meet these standards for mathematical practice will require different teaching.

41 Standards for Mathematical Practice – pgs 6-8
Silently read the mathematical practice assigned to your group and highlight your MIPs. On chart paper, your group will represent your mathematical practice in words and pictures. Be prepared to share out. Assign each regional group one of the mathematical practices. Have groups read the practice individually and write down the ideas they find most important about this practice to share with their group. On chart paper with their assigned practice written at the top, the group is to decide depending on their practice if they want to list essential vocabulary, give specific examples, write a summary in their own words, and/or illustrate the practice with a graph, icon, or drawing that describes it. Each regional group share out with whole group.

42 Standards for Mathematical Practice – pgs 6-8
Cut out your foldable and write one mathematical practice on each front flap. As each group presents their mathematical practice, use your foldable to record ideas about the meaning of each practice. The foldable needs to folded in half when the paper is in portrait direction. The lines help to make the fold easier. Use scissors to cut the eight front flaps. As each group takes 2-3min to share their mathematical practice, write the practice on the front flap, then record your thoughts and ideas you get from listening as the group describes it. foldable

43 Standards for Mathematical Content, p. 5
NOW_ the CONTENT STANDARDS Direct participants to page 5 - How to read the grade level standards. -Standards define what students should understand and be able to do. -Clusters are groups of related standards. Note that standards from different clusters may sometimes be closely related, because mathematics is a connected subject. -Domains are larger groups of related standards. Standards from different domains may sometimes be closely related.

44 Summary Pages For each grade in K-8 and each topic in high school
Grade 5, page 33 High School, Number and Quantity, page 58 Every grade K- 8th has a written summary description like page 13 and an overview page like page 14. Note Domains, Clusters, no standards – but mathematical practices always listed.

45 Overview Pages Grade 5, p. 34 High School, p. 59 Domains Clusters
Note Domains, Clusters, no standards – but mathematical practices always listed. Domains Clusters Standards Not on overview page

46 Standards for Mathematical Content
Domain Cluster This is an example from 7th grade, but they all look very similar. Elementary & middle – page 35; high school – page 60 Domain (gray): Notice abbreviation for grade and domain. In HS, no number but N for number then RN for Real Numbers Cluster title – bold Standards – numbered. Note: high school, page 60, you will notice + and * explained on page 57 Standards

47 Domain & Cluster Progression
For K-8, domains read across the page and grade levels read down the page. For high school, domains and clusters are arranged by topic and read down the page.

48 Math Topic Time Line Using the topic assigned to your group, identify where the topic starts and stops in the CCSS using the Cluster & Domain Progression handout. Discuss with your group any differences you notice between the progression of your topic in the CCSS and the KY POS. Be prepared to share your findings. Elementary =1 finger; middle school =2 fingers; high school = 3 fingers. Have participants form groups of five with a at least one person from each grade level band with people not at their table. They will need to take the handout, the standards, and a pen or pencil with them. Hand a topic card to each group. (addition & subtraction; multiplication & division; place value; volume, area, fractions, decimals, 2-D shapes, 3-D shapes, functions, equations, probability) Have each group record their progression on the time line and discuss any differences they recognize. Ask groups to put their topic card in the center of the table. Collect. Remain in these groups for the next activity.

49 Crosswalk KDE has developed a crosswalk between the Common Core State Standards and the KY Program of Studies. KDE > Instructional Resources > Curriculum Documents & Resources > Program of Studies It is over 150 pages so you probably don’t want to download the entire document!

50 Standards for Mathematical Practice – Final Reflection
Why is it important that the standards for mathematical practice be the lens through which we look at the content? What implications do these standards for mathematical practice have on: The way we need to teach? The way students learn? The way curriculum is designed? The way assessments are designed? The way we structure these network meetings? Think, Pair, Share with a partner We spent time in groups coming up with a good way to remember each of the mathematical practices and we recorded all the ideas on a foldable. Hopefully this along with looking for examples of the mathematical practice in specific content standards will help teachers to see these as important. How can we make sure to continue to emphasize these as much or more than the content standards throughout the year?

51 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

52 Highly Effective Teaching and Learning
Target: I can provide information concerning the components and utility of Kentucky’s Characteristics of Highly Effective Teaching and Learning.

53 Independent Task Write one paragraph describing a success you’ve seen in the last year as a result of improved teaching and learning. Explain the factors or conditions that contributed to the success. The success could also be an area in which progress is being made even if you don’t consider it a ‘success’ yet.

54 Success Analysis Protocol (from Power of Protocols, p. 60)
In teams of 4, the first person shares his or her paragraph of successful practice. (1 min.) All participants analyze the success, focusing on what seems to have contributed to the success. (2 min.) Repeat. (12 min. total) Compile a list of common characteristics of the successes in the team. (3 min.) Discussion/Debrief (5 min.) 20 minutes total for this task

55 Enhancing Learning What factors, within the control of a school districts and schools, have the most significant influence on student learning? High quality instructional practices Well designed curriculum, assessments and instructional materials aligned to standards Strong school leadership Harvard’s Public Education Leadership Project

56 Do we share the same language and vision?
Do we all agree on what these interactions between teachers and students around content should look like? Do we have a clearly articulated consensus on good teaching? If the answer to either of these questions is “no” what implications does this have for collaboration within a network?

57 Looking for Highly Effective Instruction
1’s will be given a list of Characteristics to use while observing a video of a science classroom while 2’s will observe the same classroom video without the Characteristics. Both groups should record observations. Provide descriptive feedback to this teacher about her classroom climate. What will you say to her? What evidence will you use to support your feedback? What suggestions might you provide? #1’s get the video viewing companion; estimated time 30 minutes

58 Learning Climate Video Clip

59 Looking for Highly Effective Instruction
1’s will be given a list of Characteristics to use while observing a video of a science classroom while 2’s will observe the same classroom video without the Characteristics. Both groups should record observations. Provide descriptive feedback to this teacher about her classroom climate. What will you say to her? What evidence will you use to support your feedback? What suggestions might you provide? Pair up with your neighbor—did your answers vary? How? #1’s get the video viewing companion; estimated time 30 minutes

60 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

61 Assessment Literacy Learning Targets
CASL Introductory Presentation Assessment Literacy Learning Targets I can articulate the various users and uses of classroom assessment information. I can describe the relationship between assessment and student motivation. I can distinguish between assessment for learning and assessment of learning I can explain the need for clear purpose in assessment. Slide 8 Activity: “Plus/Minus” Purpose: To present the five keys to assessment quality with process activities embedded into the presentation When You Would Use This: When you want to personalize assessment’s effects on student motivation and point out the problems that students face when assessments do not meet standards of quality Time: 15–60 minutes Directions: Say, “Think of a time when you were assessed and it was a negative experience. What made it negative?” Have participants share their experiences with a partner for five minutes. Then conduct a large group discussion, charting the causes—their answers to the part of the question that asks “What made it negative?” Participants generally mention both accuracy issues and issues relating to impact on the student. Possible chart title: “Causes of Negative Assessment Experiences” © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

62 CASL Introductory Presentation
Assessment Literacy Think of a time you were assessed and it was a negative experience. What made it negative? Slide 8 Activity: “Plus/Minus” Purpose: To present the five keys to assessment quality with process activities embedded into the presentation When You Would Use This: When you want to personalize assessment’s effects on student motivation and point out the problems that students face when assessments do not meet standards of quality Time: 15–60 minutes Directions: Say, “Think of a time when you were assessed and it was a negative experience. What made it negative?” Have participants share their experiences with a partner for five minutes. Then conduct a large group discussion, charting the causes—their answers to the part of the question that asks “What made it negative?” Participants generally mention both accuracy issues and issues relating to impact on the student. Possible chart title: “Causes of Negative Assessment Experiences” © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

63 CASL Introductory Presentation
Assessment Literacy Now think of a time you were assessed and it was a positive experience. What made it positive? Slide 9 Then say: “Now think of a time when you were assessed and it was a positive experience. What made it positive?” Again, give participants about 5 minutes to share experiences with a partner. Then conduct a large group discussion, charting the causes—their answers to the part of the question that asks “What made it positive?” Participants generally mention both accuracy issues and issues relating to impact on the student. Possible chart title: “Causes of Positive Assessment Experiences” © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

64 Used with skill, assessment can
CASL Introductory Presentation Used with skill, assessment can Motivate the unmotivated Restore students’ desire to learn Encourage students to keep learning Create—not simply measure—increased achievement --Stiggins, Arter, Chappuis, & Chappuis, 2004 Slide 3 Activity: “How Can Assessment Motivate Effectively?” Purpose: To begin thinking differently about the connection between assessment and motivation When You Would Use This: When you want a quick anticipatory set for challenging conventional thinking about the connection between assessment and motivation Time: 5–15 minutes Directions: This is the opening claim from the CASL book, page 3. Say: “We normally think of assessment as the measurer of change. Yet we know that it can do more. It can (read list). How can it do those things?” (Pause for a moment and then go on to the next slide.) © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

65 CASL Introductory Presentation
Assessment Literacy What assessment practices motivate students to improve their learning? Slide 4 (This slide is the process question for the claims on the previous slide.) Ask this question and let participants talk at their tables for a few minutes to share their thoughts. Conduct a large group discussion, charting their responses. Possible chart title: “Ways Assessment Can Motivate Students to Improve” © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

66 CASL Introductory Presentation
ACCURACY EFFECTIVE USE PURPOSE EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION DESIGN STUDENT INVOLVEMENT Slide 28 “We have developed a framework of five keys to assessment quality that encompasses the research recommendations and forms the basis for our program. The five keys are Clear Purpose, Clear Targets, Sound Design, Effective Communication, and Student Involvement. Each of the keys to quality is explained in depth in the text, Classroom Assessment for Student Learning: Doing It Right—Using It Well (CASL).” TARGET © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

67 What’s the PURPOSE for assessment?
CASL Introductory Presentation Assessment Literacy What’s the PURPOSE for assessment? Slide 31 “What is the purpose for the assessment? How do we generally use the results? What is the usual answer to this question?” © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

68 Key 1: Clear Assessment Purpose
CASL Introductory Presentation Key 1: Clear Assessment Purpose Always begin by asking What decisions? Who’s making them? What information will be helpful to them? Slide 30 “To establish a clear assessment purpose we ask the following questions: What decisions will this assessment inform? Who is making these decisions? What information will be most useful in making those decisions? The answers to these questions determine what information is needed, and in what form—the key first step in assessment planning, whether you are developing your own assessment or selecting one already developed.” © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

69 Who Uses Assessment Information, and How?
CASL Introductory Presentation Who Uses Assessment Information, and How? Beginning with the person whose birthday is closest to today and moving clockwise, assign the following roles: Student Parent Teacher Principal Athletic coach Guidance counselor Slide 5 Activity: “Role Play—Users and Uses” Purpose: 1. To help participants recognize the myriad decisions made on the basis of classroom assessment information 2. To cause participants to think about and discuss the decisions students make on the basis of classroom assessment information When You Would Use This: When you want participants to come to the conclusion (without telling them) that student information needs must be met because the decisions they make control their motivation and achievement Time: 25–30 minutes Directions: Have participants work in groups of six. Review the activity instructions on the handout. Make sure they understand they are to be thinking about classroom assessment data for this activity—the information generated by assessments coming from the classroom—not large-scale tests. Then have them assign roles at their tables. © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

70 CASL Introductory Presentation
Write your role in the blank on the yellow “Who Uses Classroom Assessment…” handout. Answer #1 individually (3 – 5 minutes), then, beginning with the “student,” share your list with others at your table. When all roles have shared, notice what conclusions you are drawing about classroom assessment. Note and discuss your responses to question #2. Slide 6 Give them about three minutes of quiet time to write their responses individually to question #1 and then about 10 minutes to share their responses in groups. Then give them five minutes to discuss at their tables thoughts about question #2. Conduct a large-group debrief: What are some of the decisions students make? What are some of the decisions that _____(select a role or two) make? What conclusions can you draw about classroom assessment? Who do you think is the most important decision-maker in this group? Why? © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

71 CASL Introductory Presentation
Some Conclusions Data must be sound because major decisions that affect students’ well-being are made on its basis. Assessment data is used for many purposes beyond grading. Students are crucial decision-makers, whose information needs must be met. Slide 7 You can use this slide to add to what participants say, if they don’t mention one or more of these points, e.g., “In addition… (read slide).” © 2009 ETS Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR, Permission to copy granted to educational agencies for use in training, subject to compliance with Conditions for Approved Use.

72 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

73 The Space Between is Virtual
Blackboard will allow us to: share resources and experiences learn and teach one another support one another throughout implementation enhance our current practices between face to face (f2f) meetings Learning Targets Develop awareness of the resources within our virtual PLC. Identify what kinds of resources can be found within various “tabs”.

74 Activities Register as a user for the OVEC Math Leadership Network (4)
Explore the following tabs: Announcements Orientation General Information Discussions f2f Meetings

75 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

76 Key 1: Clear purpose Before our next meeting:
Focusing on the purposes, users, and uses of classroom assessment, read chapters 1 and 2 of Classroom Assessment for Student Learning: Doing It Right – Using It Well (CASL). Take some time to reflect on your own practice and complete the self-assessment “Determining Where I Am Now” in Figure 2.3 on page 51.

77 Meeting dates September 15th October 20th November 17th January 19th February 16th March 16th June (TBA) All meetings will be held at the Oldham County Arts Center in Crestwood.

78 Reflection on the day… Please take a few minutes to reflect on the four components: Kentucky Core Academic Standards Highly Effective Teaching and Learning Assessment Literacy Leadership On the lavender sheet, for each component write one key learning you will take away with you today and one key question you still have in that area.

79 Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing


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