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© Boardworks Ltd 2008 1 of 27 2.1 Customer Service Provision in Business Unit 2: Developing Customer Relations 2.1 Customer Service Provision in Business.

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Presentation on theme: "© Boardworks Ltd 2008 1 of 27 2.1 Customer Service Provision in Business Unit 2: Developing Customer Relations 2.1 Customer Service Provision in Business."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 1 of 27 2.1 Customer Service Provision in Business Unit 2: Developing Customer Relations 2.1 Customer Service Provision in Business Unit 2: Developing Customer Relations © Boardworks Ltd 2008 1 of 27

2 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 2 of 27 Learning objectivesContents © Boardworks Ltd 2008 2 of 27 Teacher’s notes included in the Notes Page Flash activity (these activities are not editable) Extension activityWeb addresses Sound Printable activity For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation

3 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 3 of 27 Customer needs and expectations © Boardworks Ltd 2008 3 of 27 In this section, you will consider what customer service involves. Defining customer service Identifying customer needs and expectations Responding to customer needs and expectations

4 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 4 of 27 Customer service Can you think of any examples of organizations that buy things from other organizations? In this unit, the most important word is customer. Do you know what a customer is? You might think a customer is a person who buys goods or services. However, this is not always the case, as organizations can be customers themselves.

5 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 5 of 27 Customers of different organizations

6 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 6 of 27 Definition of customer We now know that customers can be either individuals or organizations, and that in order to be a customer, it is not essential to purchase the goods or services provided. Customer: a person or organization who uses a product or service. Therefore, what do you think might be a better definition of a customer?

7 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 7 of 27 Customer service is an organization's ability to identify and supply their customers' wants and needs. The Institute of Customer Service (ICS) has a more complex, but complete, definition of customer service: Customer service “Customer service is the sum total of what an organization does to meet customer expectations and produce customer satisfaction. Customer service generally involves service teamwork and service partnerships. Although somebody may take a leading part in delivering customer service, it normally involves actions by a number of people in a team or in several different organizations.” What is the key feature of customer service according to the ICS definition?

8 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 8 of 27 Identifying customer needs

9 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 9 of 27 Identifying customer needs

10 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 10 of 27 Customer expectations

11 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 11 of 27 Customer expectations Customer expectations can be different depending upon the situation they are in. For each of the key words, suggest one type of organization – or job role – it would be most relevant to (e.g. police officers would need to be alert during their job). Polite Patient Intelligent Confident Competent Charming Humorous Accurate Respectful Honest Good-looking Well-dressed Informed Enthusiastic Reliable Alert Clean Consider the following customer expectations again:

12 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 12 of 27 Accuracy and reliability Customers will expect to be given accurate and reliable information about products and services. Accurate means that the information given is true and correct. Reliable means that the information given is honest and consistent. Can you think of any times when you have been given inaccurate or unreliable information?

13 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 13 of 27 Accuracy and reliability

14 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 14 of 27 Providing information and advice

15 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 15 of 27 Providing information and advice This information and advice may come from a variety of sources, not just from customer service staff. Customer service is not just about selling products or services to customers, it is also about ensuring that all their needs are met. This can involve providing large amounts of information and advice to assist the customer in choosing the most appropriate product or service. What other sources of information or advice can you think of in addition to customer service staff?

16 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 16 of 27 Providing information and advice

17 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 17 of 27 Providing information and advice

18 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 18 of 27 by telephone online through printed material. Assistance and help Most businesses will have a Customer Service department that customers can visit, not only to make complaints, but also to gain assistance and help. What examples of assistance or help can you think of that customers might ask for? As well as face-to-face, assistance and help can also be given in other forms, including:

19 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 19 of 27 Dealing with special needs All customers are likely to have special needs, which organizations must cater for. These needs may be related to: circumstances – requiring a product or information before a certain time or for a set purpose personal requirements – needing a product or information customized or adapted in a specific way individual traits – requiring different products or information because of beliefs, age, fashion preferences, etc. disability – needing special help due to problems with mobility or another impairment.

20 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 20 of 27 Dealing with special needs

21 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 21 of 27 Dealing with problems Problems with customer service arise when a customer’s needs and expectations have not been met. This could be something simple, such as a customer being unable to locate a particular product in a supermarket. Alternatively, it could be something more financially significant, such as a company not being able to supply sufficient goods. It could also be very serious, such as a company selling potentially lethal products to customers. Customer service staff must be trained to deal with simpler problems and know their employer’s procedures for passing on and recording more complex problems.

22 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 22 of 27 Organizational targets Most organizations will set targets for different aspects of business performance. Customer service targets are the targets set for those staff dealing directly with customers. In order to achieve the targets they set, organizations must ensure they are specific and measurable. Organizational targets (often referred to as performance indicators) are targets against which staff performance can be measured. What sort of customer service-related targets might organizations set for themselves?

23 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 23 of 27 Organizational targets Organizations are usually reluctant to publish details of customer service targets or performance indicators. Why do you think this might be? However, most large organizations will publish details of their customer service policies and strategies in their annual reports. These are usually available to download from company websites.

24 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 24 of 27 Organizational targets

25 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 25 of 27 Health, safety and security

26 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 26 of 27 Health, safety and security

27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 27 of 27 Meeting customer needs


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