Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Cheryl Halliburton & Ayana Murray Long Island University – C.W. Post EDD 1005 – Research Methods I Dr. Jan Hammond October 23, 2011.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Cheryl Halliburton & Ayana Murray Long Island University – C.W. Post EDD 1005 – Research Methods I Dr. Jan Hammond October 23, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cheryl Halliburton & Ayana Murray Long Island University – C.W. Post EDD 1005 – Research Methods I Dr. Jan Hammond October 23, 2011

2  A Case Study is a qualitative approach in which the investigator explores a bounded system (a case) or multiple bounded systems (cases) over time through detailed in depth data collection involving multiple sources of information (e.g., observations, interviews) and reports a case description and case based themes.  The case description and case based themes are utilized to further understand a particular issue or problem (Creswell, 2007)

3  Bounded system – the “case” selected for study has boundaries, often set by time and place  Case – the “bounded system” or the “object” of the study  Case description – the “facts” about the case as recorded by the investigator  Multiple Sources of Information- the use of many different sources of information to provide “depth” to the case  Participant observer – researcher is immersed in the day to day lives of the people in the case and observes and interviews the participants (Creswell, 2007; Cohen, Manion & Morrison, 2010; Stake, 2005)

4  Multiple sources of information are utilized for the purpose of data collection: ◦ Observations ◦ Physical Artifacts ◦ Documents ◦ Audiovisual materials ◦ Interviews ◦ Archival records ◦ Reports  (Creswell, 2007) Data Collection

5  The types of qualitative case studies are distinguished by the size of the case: ◦ Individual ◦ Several Individuals ◦ Group ◦ Program ◦ Activity ◦ (Creswell, 2007)

6  There are 3 variations of types in terms of the intent of the Case Study:  Single Instrument – focuses on an issue/concern then selects 1 case to illustrate it  Collective/Multiple – the researcher chooses the issue/concern, then selects multiple cases to illustrate the issue  Intrinsic – the researcher focuses on the case itself  (Creswell, 2007; Stake, 1995)

7  Is the case study method appropriate for this issue? ◦ Clearly identifiable cases with boundaries ◦ The case should have characteristics or features that relate to the issue being investigated  Identify the case and/or cases to be used ◦ How many? ◦ Should the focus be on the case or issue? ◦ Should cases consist of purposeful sampling, ordinary cases, accessible cases and/or unusual cases?  What methods of Data Collection to use? How many? ◦ Too many detracts from the issue or case; ◦ Too few and there will be inadequate data ◦ (Creswell, 2007; Cohen et al, 2010; Stake, 1995; Yin, 2003) Procedures

8  Analysis ◦ Holistic or embedded analysis? ◦ Context of the case or setting ◦ Analyze themes  Within-case analysis  Cross-case analysis  Interpretation ◦ Meaning, reaction and lessons learned ◦ (Creswell, 2007; Cohen et al, 2010; Stake, 1995; Yin, 2003) Procedures

9  A case study allows for in-depth scrutiny of a complex issue; this scrutiny provides for greater understanding of the particular issue or problem.  “Case studies, in not having to seek frequencies of occurrences, can replace quantity with equality and intensity, separating the significant few from the insignificant many instances of behavior. Significance rather than frequency is a hallmark of case studies.” (Cohen et al, 2010) Strengths/Advantages

10  Strong on reality: Uses real people in real situations; allows for greater understanding than purely abstract theories  Can establish cause and effect relationships  Easily understood by a wide audience: Blends description of event with analysis by combining subjective and objective data  Can be undertaken by a single researcher who acts as a participant observer  Provides insights into similar situations and cases (Cohen et al,2010)

11  Appropriately identifying the case/cases  Identifying the boundaries  Finding and selecting enough data to understand the issue  Results may not be generalizable  Not easy to cross-check information  Prone to problems of observer bias because researcher is involved in the study (Cresswell, 2007; Cohen et al, 2010) Limitations/Weaknesses

12  A case study provides a unique example of real people in real situations, enabling readers to understand ideas more clearly than simply presenting them with abstract theories or principles. Indeed a case study can enable readers to understand how ideas and abstract principles can fit together. Case studies can penetrate situations in ways that are not always susceptible to numerical analysis. (Cohen et al, 2010; Yin, 2009) Conclusion

13 Cohen, L. & Manion, L. & Morrison, K. (2010). Research methods in education. London: Routledge. Creswell, J. W. (2007). Qualitative inquiry & research design: Choosing among five approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Stake, R. (1995). The art of case study research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Yin, R.K. (2003). Case study research: Design and method (3 rd ed.) Thousand Oaks,CA: Sage. Yin, R.K. (2009). Case study research: Design and method (4 th ed.) Thousand Oaks,CA: Sage.


Download ppt "Cheryl Halliburton & Ayana Murray Long Island University – C.W. Post EDD 1005 – Research Methods I Dr. Jan Hammond October 23, 2011."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google