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© Boardworks Ltd 2003 1 of 14 Subordinating Conjunctions This icon indicates that detailed teacher’s notes are available in the Notes Page. For more detailed.

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Presentation on theme: "© Boardworks Ltd 2003 1 of 14 Subordinating Conjunctions This icon indicates that detailed teacher’s notes are available in the Notes Page. For more detailed."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 1 of 14 Subordinating Conjunctions This icon indicates that detailed teacher’s notes are available in the Notes Page. For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation. This icon indicates the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable.

2 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 2 of 14 Subordinating conjunctions This presentation will teach you: what a complex sentence is to write complex sentences what a subordinate clause is to understand how using subordinate clauses can improve your writing.

3 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 3 of 14 Let’s quickly recap basic sentences. Can you remember the difference between simple and compound sentences? Simple sentences contain a subject, a verb, an object and make sense on their own. For example: I like tea. SubjectVerbObject Simple sentences

4 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 4 of 14 Simple sentences Read the sentences below. 1.John loves television. 2.My brother eats worms. 3.Norman picks his nose. Decide which word is the verb, subject and object in each sentence. verb subject object

5 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 5 of 14 Compound sentences Compound sentences are simple sentences which have been joined together by or, and or but. I like tea. I like coffee. These are two simple sentences. They can be joined into a compound sentence: I like tea and I like coffee.

6 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 6 of 14 Activity

7 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 7 of 14 The subordinate clause

8 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 8 of 14 The missing words provide us with additional information. they tell us that Mr Farrell is an English teacher, that the speaker lives in Manchester and the record he lost belongs to Judith. However, although the extra information is helpful we don’t really need it to understand the sentence. The sentences fall in to two parts… The subordinate clause

9 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 9 of 14 First, the main and most important idea in the sentence. This is called the main clause Second, the additional information in the sentence. This is the information we don’t really need but helps. This is called the subordinate clause The subordinate clause

10 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 10 of 14 A sentence with a main clause and a subordinate clause is known as a In the sentences we have looked at the clauses have been joined by ‘who’, ‘which’ and ‘that’. Later we will learn some more ways of adding clauses. Complex sentences complex sentence

11 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 11 of 14 Complex sentences Look at the picture and accompanying notes. Compose sentences using subordinate clauses. Remember to use ‘who’, ‘which’ and ‘that’. Patricia 14-years-old likes baseball cap given by American aunt owns a baseball shirt baseball shirts are fashionable with American teenagers.

12 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 12 of 14 Complex sentences Imagine somebody has been asked to write a brief report about you. They have asked you to provide some details. Write down some notes about yourself: appearance, background, hobbies, likes, dislikes etc. Swap notes and write a brief biography about your partner. Remember to use ‘who’, ‘which’ and ‘that’.

13 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 13 of 14 Is it best to use simple or complex sentences? There is a place for both simple and compound sentences. Sometimes it is best to be brief. For example, emergency instructions tend to be in simple sentences. Stories written for very young children use simple and compound sentences, too. Complex sentences make our writing more interesting and precise. They help us to give the reader lots of additional information without simply joining many simple sentences together using ‘and’.

14 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 14 of 14 To sum up Complex sentences help us to give additional information in our writing in a mature and interesting way. They contain at least two clauses: main and subordinate. One way of introducing the additional information is to use ‘who’, ‘which’ or ‘that’.


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