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Act 606: Financial Aid Training 3-Hour. Academic Challenge Scholarship.

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Presentation on theme: "Act 606: Financial Aid Training 3-Hour. Academic Challenge Scholarship."— Presentation transcript:

1 Act 606: Financial Aid Training 3-Hour

2 Academic Challenge Scholarship

3 It is our hope that the lottery funded scholarship known as the Arkansas Academic Challenge Scholarship will: -- increase student success --reduce student loans --prepare more students for high wage high demand jobs benefit Arkansas’s economy --increase the percentage of adults in Arkansas that hold a college degree

4 Increase participation of direct-from-high-school students from 3,600 to over 10,000 annually Projected to serve over 29,000 students during the 2010-11 academic year “NEW” Academic Challenge

5 Arkansas Academic Challenge Scholarship Student categories – Traditional – Current Achiever – Nontraditional

6 General Eligibility Requirements U.S. Citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident Arkansas Resident Attend an eligible Arkansas Institution Satisfactory Academic Standing Continuing Eligibility Requirements

7 Academic Challenge Scholarship Scholarships awarded under the “NEW” Academic Challenge will begin Fall 2010 NO INCOME REQUIREMENT Aligned with Smart Core Expanded to include nontraditional students Basic eligibility criteria – Traditional Students Accepted for admission at an approved institution of higher education as a full-time student in a program of study that leads to a baccalaureate degree, associate degree, qualified certificate or a nursing school diploma Applicant must complete the YOUniversal Scholarship Application and the FAFSA

8 Academic Challenge Scholarship Traditional – Traditional Student requirements (cont..) Must meet one of the following criteria: – Graduate from an Arkansas public high school, successfully complete the Smart Core curriculum and achieve a 2.5 high school GPA OR obtain a 19 on the ACT – (before 2014 -- No Smart Core), Graduate from an Arkansas public high school, achieve a 2.5 high school GPA AND obtain a 19 on the ACT OR score proficient on all state-mandated end-of-course assessments – If student graduates from an Arkansas public high school that is identified as a school in which 20% or more of the students received a letter grade of “B” or higher but did not score proficient or higher on the end-of-course assessment, the student must achieve a 2.5 high school GPA AND obtain a 19 on the ACT OR score proficient on all state-mandated end-of-course assessments Grade Inflation Clause Delayed Until 2011

9 Academic Challenge Scholarship Traditional – If a student has a disability identified under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and graduated from an Arkansas public high school but did not complete the Smart Core because of the applicant’s individualized education program, the student must achieve a 2.5 high school GPA AND obtain a 19 on the ACT OR score proficient on all state-mandated end- of-course assessments – Graduate from a private, out-of-state high school or home school and achieve a 19 on the ACT

10 Academic Challenge Scholarship Traditional Continued Eligibility Criteria: – Maintain a 2.50 cumulative GPA – Complete 27 semester hours the first academic year and 30 semester hours each year thereafter – Renewed annually until recipient first: 1.Earns Bachelor’s degree 2.Attempts a total of 130 semester hours in 8 semesters The Academic Challenge Scholarship requires “Traditional” students to: --- take 12 hours during the first Fall semester after high school graduation and take 15 hours each semester thereafter --- complete remediation within the first 30 hours of coursework

11 Academic Challenge Scholarship Current Achievers – Current Achievers Accepted for admission at an approved institution of higher education as a full-time student in a program of study that leads to a baccalaureate degree, associate degree, qualified certificate or a nursing school diploma Applicant must complete the YOUniversal Scholarship Application and the FAFSA

12 Academic Challenge Scholarship Current Achievers Current Achievers Must meet all of the following criteria – Entered college before the 2010-11 academic year as a full-time first-time freshman within 12 months after graduating high school – Has been continuously enrolled (fall and spring), completing at least 12 hours each semester, since high school graduation – Has completed at least 12 semester credit hours at an approved Arkansas institution – Achieved a 2.5 postsecondary GPA

13 Academic Challenge Scholarship Current Achiever Continued Eligibility Criteria: – Maintain a 2.50 cumulative GPA – Complete 15 semester hours each consecutive semester (Fall & Spring) – Renewed annually until recipient first: 1.Earns Bachelor’s degree 2.Attempts a total of 130 semester hours in 8 semesters The Academic Challenge Scholarship requires “Current Achiever” students to: --take 15 hours each semester -- complete remediation within the first 30 hours of coursework

14 Funding CAP for Current Achievers Current Achiever student funding: – $41.5 Million for 2010-2011 – If sufficient funds are not available, awards will be prioritized Level of progress toward completion of their baccalaureate or associate degree, certificate program or nursing diploma Highest cumulative GPA Students majoring in an area identified as a critical workforce need, and the STEM fields

15 Academic Challenge Scholarship Nontraditional Nontraditional Students Accepted for admission at an approved institution of higher education as a full-time or part-time student in a program of study that leads to a baccalaureate degree, associate degree, qualified certificate or a nursing school diploma Applicant must complete the YOUniversal Scholarship Application and the FAFSA

16 Academic Challenge Scholarship Nontraditional – Nontraditional Students Must meet one of the following criteria – Graduate from an Arkansas public high school and achieved a 2.5 high school GPA or obtained a 19 on the ACT; or – Graduated from a private high school, out-of-state high school, home school or obtained a GED and achieved a 19 on the ACT; or – Has completed at least 12 semester credit hours and achieved a 2.5 postsecondary GPA.

17 Academic Challenge Scholarship Nontraditional Continued Eligibility Criteria: – Maintain a 2.50 cumulative GPA – Complete 15 semester hours each semester (Fall and Spring) if a full-time student and at least 6 semester hours each semester if a part-time student – Renewed annually until recipient first: 1.Earns Bachelor’s degree 2.Attempts a total of 130 semester hours in 8 semesters The Academic Challenge Scholarship requires “Nontraditional” students to: --- take at least 6 hours each semester for part-time --- take at least 15 hours each semester for full-time --- complete remediation within the first 30 hours of coursework

18 Funding CAP for Nontraditional Students Nontraditional student funding: – $17.9 Million for 2010-2011 – If sufficient funds are not available, awards will be prioritized Level of progress toward completion of their baccalaureate or associate degree, certificate program or nursing diploma Highest cumulative GPA ACT or ACT equivalent score Students majoring in an area identified as a critical workforce need, and the STEM fields

19 AWARD AMOUNTS – $5,000 per year for full-time students at a 4-year institution – Scholarship at a 2-year college will be one-half (50%) of the scholarship award amounts for 4- year institution – Award amounts will be prorated for part-time students (only applies to nontraditional category) ½ award amount – 6-8 hours ¾ award amount – 9-14 hours

20 Academic Challenge Scholarship Application Deadline Dates: – Traditional Students June 1 of senior year in high school Can start applying in November of Senior year – Current Achiever Students June 1 for the Fall term November 1 for the Spring term (subject to change) – Nontraditional Students June 1 for the Fall term November 1 for the Spring term (subject to change)

21 Application/Award Statistics Number of Applicants: – Traditional (High School Seniors) – 16,951 – Current Achiever/Nontraditional – 45,004 Number Awarded (so far): as of 12/10/2010 – Traditional (High School Seniors) – 12,887 – Current Achiever/Nontraditional – 12,267

22 Administrative Processing 1.Electronic (TRIAND) transcripts – Transcript retrieval – Smart Core criteria – GPA – ACT & other test scores 2.Notifications to students (emails) 1.Award Notices 2.Incomplete Notices 3.Ineligible Notices

23 New Universal Application for ADHE Scholarships and Grants www.adhe.edu  Launched on January 1, 2010  Search and apply for all ADHE administered scholarships and grants at one time  Receive e-mail status notifications  Available all year, but deadlines built into processing  Manage your account 24/7 to include: Updating personal information and college Reviewing transcript and test score information

24 Universal Application Homepage

25 Scholarship Reporting System for Counselors Reporting abilities: – List of Seniors that have submitted scholarship application – Status of Application – Provide the ACT/GPA/Smart core indication that is being used to evaluate student What other reporting items would be helpful???

26 QUESTIONS???

27 Contact Information: finaid@adhe.edu (501) 371-2050

28 Financial Aid in Arkansas Financial Aid Programs Administered by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education

29 ADHE Programs Academic Challenge Scholarship (Lottery) Governor’s Scholars Program Higher Education Opportunity Grant (GO Opportunities) State Teacher Education Program (STEP) Teacher Opportunity Program (TOP) Military Dependents’ Scholarship Law Enforcement Officer’s Dependents Scholarship Arkansas Health Education Grant (ARHEG) Workforce Improvement Grant

30 General Eligibility Requirements U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident Alien Arkansas Resident Eligible Arkansas Institution Satisfactory Academic Standing Continuing Eligibility Requirements

31 Scholarship program that encourages Arkansas’s best & brightest high school students to remain in Arkansas for their college education Categorized into two (2) designations: – Governor’s Distinguished Scholarship (up to $10,000 per year) 32 ACT or 1410 SAT; and 3.5 academic GPA; or National Merit or National Achievement Finalist – Governor’s Scholarship (up to $4,000 per year) 27 ACT; or 3.5 academic GPA Students ranked based on ACT, GPA, Rank In Class & Leadership Awarded to one (1) student per Arkansas county

32 Governor’s Scholars Program Full-time - 15 semester hours – 12 semester hours 1st semester freshman year only Governor’s Distinguished Scholarship - maintain a 3.25 GPA Governor’s Scholarship – maintain 3.0 GPA Recipients must complete 27 hours the first year and 30 hours each year thereafter Program leads to a bachelor’s degree Deadline - February 1st

33 Higher Education Opportunities Grant Known as the “Go! Grant” Need-based grant program that provides assistance to disadvantaged students – Full-time = $1,000 per year – Part-Time = $500 per year Renewable for up to $4,000

34 Higher Education Opportunities Grant (GO! Grant) Basic Eligibility Requirements: – Accepted for admission in a qualified certificate program, associate degree program or a baccalaureate program at an approved institution – Demonstrate financial need (complete FAFSA) $25,000 max family AGI for family with one (1) in the household – Additional $5,000 per additional number in household up to ten (10) additional household members – Recipients must maintain 2.0 GPA & continue to meet the need criteria – Available to any student that meets the basic eligibility requirements regardless of age and high school grad date (traditional & non-traditional students)

35 State Teacher Education Program (STEP) Basic Eligibility Criteria – Hold a valid Arkansas teaching license – Teach full-time in a public school district in Arkansas in a designated shortage area – Graduate from a teacher education program after April 2004 – Have an outstanding federal student loan balance Loan Repayment Amounts: – $3,000 per year for a maximum of three (3) years for teaching in a subject and/or geographic shortage area Additional $1,000 per year minority teacher

36 Teacher Opportunity Program (TOP) Basic eligibility criteria – Be employed as a classroom teacher or administrator by a school district in the state for no less than three (3) years – Returns to an approved institution of higher education to pursue additional education related to job Priority will be given to those applicants that are pursuing an additional licensure in a subject area declared to be a shortage area Award Amount: Reimbursement – Cost associated with six (6) semester credit hours or the equivalent

37 Critical Academic Shortage Areas – Math (Secondary) – Middle Childhood – Special Education – Science (Secondary) Life/Earth Science (7-12) Physical/Earth Science (7-12) – Foreign Language Spanish French Mandarin Chinese – Library Media – School Counselor – Gifted & Talented

38 Military Dependents Scholarship Dependent or spouse of MIA, KIA or POW or 100% permanent and total disability Arkansas resident State supported college, university or technical institute Must apply for Chapter 35 benefits from the VA Waiver of tuition, fees, room and board in excess of VA benefits

39 Law Enforcement Officers Dependents Scholarship Dependent/spouse of Arkansas law enforcement officer Killed or totally disabled in the line-of-duty State supported college, university or technical institute Waiver of tuition, fees and room Under 23 years old (except spouse)

40 Eligible Law Enforcement Officers State Highway Police Municipal Police Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff Constable Game Warden Municipal Firefighter Some Highway Department Employees

41 Eligible Law Enforcement Officers State park employees State forestry employees when fighting fires State correction employees Emergency Medical Technicians Department of Community Punishment Employees Teachers

42 Arkansas Health Education Grant (ARHEG) Provides assistance for Arkansas residents attending certain out-of-state health and medical professional schools – School of Dentistry – School of Optometry – School of Veterinary Medicine – School of Podiatric Medicine – School of Chiropractic Medicine – School of Osteopathic Medicine

43 Workforce Improvement Program Students 24 and older that have unmet financial need Allocated to campuses based upon percentage of students 24 and older Up to $2,000 per year

44 Financial Aid in a Nutshell Money from a source other than the family to assist with the cost of attending college

45 Types of Aid Gift Aid – Grants – Scholarships Non-gift Aid – Loans – Employment

46 Sources of Aid Federal government States Colleges Private sources

47 Financial Need Cost of Attendance (COA) – Expected Family Contribution (EFC) Financial Need

48 Cost of Attendance Direct costs Indirect costs COA varies widely from college to college

49 Expected Family Contribution (EFC) Amount family can reasonably be expected to contribute Stays the same regardless of college Two components – Parent contribution – Student contribution Calculated using FAFSA data and a formula specified in law

50 FAFSA4caster

51 Why do we need the FAFSA4caster? Help students determine how they are going to pay for college Eligibility for aid influences decisions about college Financial aid planning process before college applications are due

52 Benefits of the FAFSA4caster Provides an estimated Expected Family Contribution (EFC) Calculate eligibility for federal aid, including grants Reduce time to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

53

54 PIN Registration Web site: www.pin.ed.gov Can request PIN before January 1, 2010 Not required, but speeds processing May be used by students and parents throughout aid process, including subsequent school years

55 Special Circumstances Dependent students having difficulty obtaining parental information – May submit incomplete FAFSA – FAFSA provides examples of acceptable and unacceptable special circumstances – Students should contact financial aid office at their college – Students must document their special circumstance

56 Private Sources Foundations Community organizations and civic groups Religious or ethnicity-based organizations Organizations related to student’s field Local businesses and employers

57 Sources of Information USDE Counselor’s Website www.fsa4counselors.ed.gov ADHE Website www.adhe.edu Arkansas Student Loan Authority www.fundmyfuture.info Student Aid on the Web www.studentaid.ed.gov Federal Student Aid Gateway www.federalstudentaid.gov Free Application for Federal Student Aid www.fafsa.ed.gov

58 Sources of Information FAFSA PIN Application www.pin.ed.gov FAFSA Forecaster www.fafsa4caster.ed.gov

59 Future of Arkansas Higher Education 59

60 State Per Capita Personal Income v. Share of Adult Population with Bachelor's Degree or Higher (2008) DC TX NM FL ND NC AL IN LA MI WI SD WY TN NV AR IA OH ID SC KY MS WV MO ME AZ VA NJ PA MD MT CT MA CO NE AK GA HI KSOR DE IL RIMN WA UT VT NHNY CA OK No state with a low proportion of Bachelor’s degrees has a high per capita income. No state with a high proportion of Bachelor’s degrees has a low per capita income. 2008= 18.8% 2002= 19.7% 20062005 2002 20072008 60

61 U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 51 st (16.7%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Bachelors & Higher Percent of County Population that hold Bachelors & Higher 2000 Pope 19.0% Washington 24.5% Pulaski 28.1% Clark 19.8% Benton 20.3% Faulkner 25.2% Craighead 20.9%

62 Where Arkansas Bachelors Degree (and higher) Holders live (2000) U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 51 st (16.7%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Bachelors & Higher 60% of all college AR graduates reside in 9 counties Pulaski 23.%

63 Strengthening the Arkansas Education Pipeline

64 Percent 96-97 Arkansas 9 th Grader’s Progression into High School and College (percent) 100% 71% 28% Fall 2000 College Freshmen

65 96-97 Arkansas 9 th Grader’s Progression into High School and College (number) Fall 2000 College Freshmen 100% 71% 28%

66 Reading Remediation Rates by County Fall 2007 % Needing Remediation First-time entering (full- and part-time) students seeking an associate or baccalaureate degree.

67 English Remediation Rates by County Fall 2007 % Needing Remediation First-time entering (full- and part-time) students seeking an associate or baccalaureate degree.

68 % Needing Remediation Math Remediation Rates by County Fall 2007 First-time entering (full- and part-time) students seeking an associate or baccalaureate degree.

69 % Needing Remediation Unduplicated Remediation Rates by County Fall 2007 First-time entering (full- and part-time) students seeking an associate or baccalaureate degree.

70 A student who has to take remediation graduates at less than half the rate of students who come to college with the requisite skills. 70

71 By the end of this decade, more than 60% of jobs will require college education 1 26% Today, 26% of Arkansas’s young adults aged 25-34 have a college degree. 2 1 Carnevale, T., Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, 2009. High-growth fields based on national projections of total new and replacement jobs. http://cew.georgetown.edu/research/jobs/79012.htmlhttp://cew.georgetown.edu/research/jobs/79012.html 2 “College degree” means an associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or higher. National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), 2008 (from U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample File.) http://www.higheredinfo.orghttp://www.higheredinfo.org Is 26% enough? 71

72 Current percentage of young adults (25-34) with a college degree 3 3 “College degree” means an associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or higher. National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), 2008 (from U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample File.) http://www.higheredinfo.orghttp://www.higheredinfo.org 72

73 Current percentage of young adults (25-34) with a college degree 3 3 “College degree” means an associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or higher. National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), 2008 (from U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample File.) http://www.higheredinfo.orghttp://www.higheredinfo.org 73

74 1.Strengthening the Arkansas Education Pipeline 2.Improving Preparation 3.Decreasing Remediation 4.Accessing Financial Aid 5.Increasing Retention and Graduation 6.Enhancing Funding and Governance 7.Addressing Data Needs 8.Supporting Economic Development 9.Issues for Further Study 74

75 Arkansas Higher Education is Changing 41 percent increase in enrollment 75

76 Credentials Awarded are Increasing 79 % Increase in Credentials 234 % Certificate of Proficiency 31 % BA/BS Degrees 192 % Technical Certificates 120 % Associates Degrees 49 % Masters Degrees 93 % Doctoral Degrees 76

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112 Speed to Market and Close to Customer Ed Barlow, Futurist: 1.Implement a series of initiatives that expedite the number of degrees produced and the speed at which degrees are produced. 2.Enhance the production of degrees in high –demand programs that are needed for the modern Arkansas economy. 3.Incentivize students to complete a degree and to work in Arkansas. 112

113 The following successes were accomplished with the help of legislative support during the last two years: Developed a universal scholarship web application that allows students to apply for the state’s 21 scholarship programs via one online application. Reduced the major factor for tuition and fee increases in Arkansas which were caused by large numbers of tuition waivers in the form of institutional scholarships. These tuition waivers resulted in higher tuition costs for all students. Provided for the seamless transfer of credits earned in completing an AA/AS degree to the universities. Developed a “Comprehensive Accountability Report” that provides the good, bad and ugly of higher education (in general) and for each institution. Expanded the eligibility for the state’s need-based scholarships to adult learners. Low income adults can now qualify for a $1,000 annual scholarship. Developed the state’s lottery scholarship criteria. In addition to $53 million in new financial aid for traditional students, scholarship funds were also allocated for adult learners/returning students ($12 million) and currently enrolled students ($43 million for 2010 to be phased out over the next 3 years). The scholarship criteria for continuing eligibility are designed to encourage speed to graduation. Established a standard remediation exit measure as a requisite for students moving into credit bearing courses in the remediated subject. 113

114 The following initiatives were conducted through ADHE policy revisions and receipt of grant funds. Based ten percent of the funding formula upon course completion FTE. Doubled the academic program degree production standard from 3 to 6 degrees per year. Slightly lower productivity standards for STEM and technical majors. Altered the academic program review process to include technical experts for AS and Certificates and out-of-state reviewers for BA/BS baccalaureate. Developed a “financial condition” report that shows how higher education institutions spend and manage their money. Changed the metric for determining if an institution was financially viable to borrow funds. In addition, institutions had to declare source of funds for maintenance. Provided extensive professional development on student success strategies. Promoted the importance of college readiness, college attendance and financial aid in Arkansas high schools. Acquired more than $1,000,000 a year in funding from grants. Provided for 43 Career Coaches to work in Arkansas’s poorest communities and high schools with low college attendance. Conducted a two-year adult learner task force of institutional leaders to determine how our institutions could be more adult-friendly.

115 Issues that higher education will be addressing in the next few years Improving remediation – assure skill attainment and maximize student success Seamless transfer of credit among institutions Maintaining financial aid programs Maintaining state support for institutions Increased accountability Enhanced academic program viability/review Out-of-state students Increase bachelor’s degree production with a target of 7,000 more bachelor’s degree per year (11k -18k) by 2015 (an increase of 64%) 115

116 civic involvement volunteer activity by education levels Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2003). Volunteering in the United States, 2003. USDL03-888. U.S. Department of Labor. 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 9.9% (48 hours) 21.7% (48 hours) 34.1% (52 hours) 45.6% (60 hours) Percentage Volunteering

117 blood donation by education level, 1994: Source: DBD Worldwide. (2000). DBD Lifestyle Survey. Chicago. Available at www.bowlingalone.com 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 6% 11% 13% 17% Percentage Donating Blood percentage who donate regularly civic involvement

118 participation assistance programs Source: Postsecondary Education Opportunity, May 28, 1997, pg 47. Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College & Bachelor’s Degree or More 24.3% 10.2% 4.6% Ever Participated in Assistance Programs education level government

119 incarceration rates by education levels 2.5% 2.0% 1.5% 1.0% 0.5% 0.0% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 1.9% 1.2% 0.3% 0.1% Percentage Incarcerated Source: Harlow, C.W. (2003). Education and Correctional Populations. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Department of Justice. NCJ195670.

120 economic Percent Below Poverty Threshold, 2004 economic Percent Below Poverty Threshold, 2004 Census Bureau 40% 30% 10% 0% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 32% 15% 10% 4% Percentage Home Ownership 20%

121 economic unemployment rates and education level, 2004 Source: Employment Policy Institute 10 8 6 4 2 0 Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 9.7% 7.5% 5.1% 4.6%

122 economic Average family income by educational attainment, 2003 Source: Postsecondary Education Opportunity, 2005 25 175 50 100 75 125 150 0 LT-99-12HSG Some Prof MA PhDBAAA Income ($000) College

123 3,798,9405,254,193Professional degree 2,527,3243,982,577Doctorate 1,507,8232,963,076Master's degree $1,111,921$2,567,174Bachelor's degree 346,1201,801,373Associate degree 270,5691,725,822Some college, no degree 01,455,253High school graduate -304,5551,150,698High school dropout -$478,903$976,350Less than 9th grade Difference Compared to High School Graduate Estimated Lifetime Earnings Education Level Source: Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, 2005 The Impact of Education on Individuals: Lifetime Earnings economic

124 Contact Information finaid@adhe.edu www.adhe.edu 501-371-2050 124


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