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Solvay Business School SEMINAIRE DE TECHNOLOGIES DE L’INFORMATION ET DE LA COMMUNICATION UNIVERSITE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES eBusiness - Introduction Pascale.

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Presentation on theme: "Solvay Business School SEMINAIRE DE TECHNOLOGIES DE L’INFORMATION ET DE LA COMMUNICATION UNIVERSITE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES eBusiness - Introduction Pascale."— Presentation transcript:

1 Solvay Business School SEMINAIRE DE TECHNOLOGIES DE L’INFORMATION ET DE LA COMMUNICATION UNIVERSITE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES eBusiness - Introduction Pascale Vande Velde GEST 116

2 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 2 Introduction – Part I Introduction – Part II Payments & security Supply chain management Content of eBusiness course

3 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 3 Technical enablers Case 2 : web banking site (transaction) Case 3 : life insurance site (servicing) Agenda Case 1 : a newspaper site (information)

4 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 4 A complex topic…

5 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 5 Technical enablers Internet Architecture developments Linux OS Java

6 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 6 Internet history The Internet is a publicly available worldwide system of interconnected computer networks that transmit data by packet switching using a standardized Internet Protocol (IP) The core networks forming the internet started out in 1969 as the ARPAnet, created by the US Department of Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) The objective of the ARPAnet was to connect different computers and networks designed by different vendors into a network of networks. The Department of Defence found out that their computers could not communicate between each other ARPAnet used a protocol called NCP (Network Control Protocol). ARPAnet moved to the TCP/IP protocol in 1983 Under ARPAnet several major innovations occurred: email (or electronic mail), the ability to send simple messages to another person across the network (1971); telnet, a remote connection service for controlling a computer (1972); and file transfer protocol (FTP), which allows information to be sent from one computer to another in bulk (1973)email Another important step in the development of the internet was National Science Foundation building of a university backbone, the NSFnet, in 1986 Internet Protocol software was soon being placed on every type of computer, and universities and research groups also began using in-house networks known as Local Area Networks or LAN's. These in-house networks then started using Internet Protocol software so one LAN could connect with other LAN'sLocal Area Networks The internet became widly used as from ’90s. In 1989, Tim Berners-Lee created HTML, HTTP, and the first web pages at CERN. In 1993, Mosaic, the first web browser, was released.

7 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 7 TCP/IP TCP/IP is a protocol making the communication between different networks feasible TCP/IP is composed of 3 layers : –IP (Internet Protocol) : responsible for moving packets of data from node to node. IP forwards each packet based on a four byte destination address (the IP number). The internet authorities assign ranges of numbers to different organizations. The organizations assign groups of their numbers to departments. IP operates on gateway machines that move data from department to organization to region and then around the world –TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) : is responsible for verifying the correct delivery of data from client to server. Data can be lost in the intermediate network. TCP adds support to detect errors or lost data and to trigger retransmission until the data is correctly and completely received –Sockets : is a name given to the package of subroutines that provide access to TCP/IP on most systems Addresses –TCP assigns a unique number to every workstation in the world. This IP number is a four byte value that, by convention, is expressed by converting each byte into a decimal number (0 to 255) and separating the bytes with a period. –For instance, a workstation as as IP number 130.132.59.234 and all workstations in the organization have an IP number structured as follows : 130.132.*.*

8 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 8 TCP/IP (cont’d) A end user can install TCP/IP on a personal computer without any knowledge of either the corporate or the regional network. Three pieces of information are required : –The IP address assigned to the personal computer –The part of the IP address (the subnet mask) that distinguishes other machines on the same LAN (messages can be sent to them directly) from machines in other departments or elsewhere in the world –The IP address of the router machine that connects this LAN to the rest of the world For instance : –IP address : 130.132.59.234 –Subnet mask : 255.255.255.0 –Default router : 130.132.59.1 The subnet mask tells the server that any other machine with an IP address beginning 130.132.59.* is on the same department LAN. All messages sent from a machine beginning 130.132.59.* will be sent directly to the LAN. All other messages will be sent to the default router

9 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 9 HTML/XML HTML (HyperText Markup Language), defined in 1991, is a markup language designed for the creation of web pages and other information viewable in a browser. The focus of HTML is on presentation (paragraphs, fonts, tables, graphs, etc...) There are four types of markup elements : –Structural markup that describes the purpose of text. For example Golf/h1> will cause the browser to render “Golf” as a first level heading –Presentational markup that describes the visual appearance of text, regardless of its function. For example, boldface will render “boldface” in bold text –Hypertext markup which links parts of the document to other documents –Widget elements that create objects such as buttons and lists There were several versions of HTML (HTML 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0) The successor of HTML is XML (eXtensible Markup Language). It was defined in 1998. HTML uses a set of known tags that handle common formatting tasks. XML allows you to create any tag you want (is thus extensible) and then describe these tags in a meta language known as DTD (Document type definition). A common feature of any markup language is that they intermix thet text of a document with markup instructions in the same datastream or file XML is also widely use as format for document storage Example of markup language : Anatidae The family Anatidae includes ducks, geese, and swans, but not the closely-related screamers.

10 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 10 Architecture Background “In the old days, there was no need for technical architectures” Actually, vendors brought architecture de facto with the mainframe (e.g. IBM with CICS and IMS) Business was seeking automation of manual processes primarily requesting “standalone” applications There was no PAST – (no legacy systems to integrate) Today, the IT world is much more complex and diverse Solutions are networked / distributed We have to deal with the past : legacy integration and legacy maintenance while developing the future (web, wireless, B2B)  Architecture has evolved through generations (# tiers)

11 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 11 Historical Reminder 1-tier architecture (80ies) A mainframe execution architecture is 1-tier : processing is done on the central server. Issue : No separation of concern between presentation, business logic and data logical layers. BatchOn-Line MF Desktop Computing Presentation Business Logic Data Presentation Business Logic Data Presentation Business Logic Data Presentation Business Logic Data Presentation Business Logic Data Mainframe

12 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 12 Historical Reminder 2-tier architecture (early 90ies) client server communication Client/server supports an execution style where processes on different machines communicate through messages: the « client » makes requests to the server through service interfaces and the server responds. Historical push : MS Windows and its Graphical User Interface Rationale : C/S will reduce IT costs Presentation Business Logic Business Logic Business Logic Business Logic Presentation Data Communication

13 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 13 Historical Reminder 3-tier architecture (late 90ies) A Netcentric architecture allows to share transactional data and information between users and applications. Those applications allow « publishing, interacting or transacting ». Netcentric is nothing else than an evolution of client / server, enabling the connection of employees, clients and business partners through internet. Rationale : The web requires a specific front end server to handle thousands to potentially millions of connections.

14 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 14 Historical Reminder n-tier architecture (today) n-tier architecture is a generalisation of the 3-tier architecture for multi-channel architectures P Presentation Layer Business Logic CoucheIntégration Métier Couchede traitements "lourds" Présentation Environnement Logique métier Accès aux données Communication Environnement Logique métier Accès aux données Communication Transaction Communication Environnement Logique métier Accès aux données Communication Transaction Communication Accès aux données Transaction Logique métier Services de base Environnement Communication Logique métier Environ -nement Accès données/ Persistance Couche d'adaptation Communication Logique métier Environ -nement Accès données/ Persistance Couche d'adaptation Communication Logique métier Environ -nement Accès données/ Persistance Couche d'adaptation Multiple channels integration : Web Call Center Voice Response Systems Wireless Legacy systems integration & B2B become the norm

15 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 15 Multi channel platform – technical view Business Logic Bloc 3 Firewall External Integration Layer Services & Operations Data Business Logic Bloc 2 Business Logic Bloc 1 Platform Cross Channel Applications Tier Application Server Channel Management Tier Content Business logic Session App. Server Marketing data field dynamic Page Security Package Users LDAP Firewall Presentation Tier HR/Payroll systems CRM system Accounting system Reference data systems Invoicing, billing and collection system External party system Regulatory reporting system Information delivery system Business intelligence systems Product Other Products CallCentre WebBrowser VoiceResponseUnit Voice Phone CRM VoiceLogger VoiceResponseServer WebBrowser Wireless Browser (WAP, J2ME) Internet Intranet WebBrowser Client

16 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 16 n-tier architectures aim at solving business issues Main business drivers are : –Globalisation of financial markets (mergers & acquisitions) –Increased competition –Changing client expectations –Spread of technonolgy-enabled « eBusiness » Main business drivers are : –Globalisation of financial markets (mergers & acquisitions) –Increased competition –Changing client expectations –Spread of technonolgy-enabled « eBusiness » N-tier architectures provide a solution : Resulting business needs : –Capability concentration, IT integration & cost reductions –Scalability –New product types –Short time-to-market for new product –Flexibility (IT and salesforce) –Multi-channel –High system availability & security Resulting business needs : –Capability concentration, IT integration & cost reductions –Scalability –New product types –Short time-to-market for new product –Flexibility (IT and salesforce) –Multi-channel –High system availability & security To Front-end Issues because : –They provide cross-channel coherence from a client point of view –They allow the integration of information usually spread over multiple systems –They allow single maintenance of functionality offered on multiple channels –They reduce the cost of adding an additional channel To Mid-tier issues because : –They allow better re-usability of business logic layer (made from components) To Back-end integration issues because : –They help integrate legacy systems –They enable B2B integration

17 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 17 Linux Linux is an open and free OS (downloadable from internet). It is mainly used in office applications, game softwares, mobile phones, video recorders and PDAs. Linux became the most widespread OS for internet servers. Linux, being free, is also installed on many low cost computers, a.o. In developing countries. Linux was developed by a Finner, Linus Torvalds, in 1991 at Helsinki University. Linus Torvalds is the owner of the Linux trademark. The Linux Mark Institute manages and grants Linux licences. Most of the code (71%) was written in C; other parts were written in C++, Lisp, Perl, Fortran.... Linux is a very secure OS (“virus proof”). Sales of Linux OS grow steadily. Based on IDC, 25% of all servers and 2,8% of desktops were running on Linux in 2002. You need an emulator to run Windows applications without Linux equivalent on Linux. VMware enables it with more CPU (run a client OS on a host OS). In the beginning, it was difficult to install Linux on desktops; so Linux adaption was quite slow. Nowadays, more and more computers can be bought with a Linux OS instead of a Windows OS. In addition, the installation packs are currently easier to install. They are often available on CD. Technical support is provided by Linux suppliers and users groups.

18 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 18 Linux - Applications Zona Research “The New Religion: Linux and Open Source” Octobre 2000

19 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 19 Linux - Applications Linux systems are mainly used for back office servers. They are mainly used as web servers, file servers, print servers, DNS servers, and mail servers etc. Linux systems focus on these domains for the following reasons: –They are very reliable and robust –The source code is accessible to fix any problems –Problems can be quickly fixed and are shared with the Community –Linux systems are very similar to Unix systems; it facilitates knowledge transfer –Acquisition costs are limited –Highly secure (“virus proof”) Most servers suppliers (IBM, HP, Sun, etc….) support Linux on most of their servers, including mainframes. They categorise Linux as a Tier 1 OS. All main applications are now Linux portable.

20 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 20 Java Java is an object oriented language developed by James Gosling and Sun Microsystems colleagues. In the beginning, this language was named Oak (1991). Java was commercialized in 1994. It is a language derived from C++, but more intuitive than C++. Java is independent from the platform on which it runs; therefore its success as internet application. It has been designed to support network applications : –The look and feel of a java GUI is independent of the hardware/OS –A java program can be launched on any OS/Hardware; thanks to a compilor and a virtual machine (VM) : The compilor transforms the java language in a code half way to the machine code This code is processed by a virtual machine (program written in native code on the hardware platform) that translates the java generic code in a code which can be used by the hardware Sun created the company JavaSoft, in charge for the design and the distribution of the java language. The license granted by Sun requests that all implementations are compatible.

21 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 21 Java Java is not an open source program in spite of requests by several vendors (eg IBM). There are Java APIs, to integrate a java program in a program environment. Some companies can influence the APIs design but Sun keeps ownership and control on APIs. Security –java program must be reliable and secure since they are used in a distributed/open environment, thanks to numerous controls upstream and during the code execution –The java virtual machine applies a hierarchy of security controls on the machine on which the java code will be executed –The java compilor also applies many controls on the source code Easy interaction with TCP/IP protocol thanks to a library of routines. It makes the set up of network connections much easier than with a program written in C++ Frequent use of java : –Web browsers –Intranet/internet applications –Web user interface (java beans call other programs, eg in C++) –Mobile phones –Smart cards –TV set boxes –Interfacing programs

22 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 22 Technical enablers Case 2 : web banking site (transaction) Case 3 : life insurance site (servicing) Agenda Case 1 : a newspaper site (information)

23 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 23 Steps to set up an ebusiness Define the strategy, business model Define products and services Define future processes, functionalities required Define sourcing Define technical architecture

24 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 24 Business model nProvide general and financial information to Belgian upper and middle class –Daily Belgian and international news –Financial and economic news –Leisure information nProvide information-based value added services –Archives –Personalization nInformation provided based on –Own information sources –Third party information nRevenues model –Advertising –Subscription to value added services

25 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 25 Products and services nProducts –Belgian news –Financial and economic news –Stock rates (2 minutes delay) –Investment advice –Leisure information –Newsletter –Investors’ guide nServices –Registration –My portfolio –My archives –Call centre

26 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 26 Possible sourcing PortalCapabilities Security Personalization Authorization Customer services Community EAI Customer Relationship Management Content Management Vignette Documentum Interwoven - IBM Process Integration Broadvision Eportal server IBM Abaxx ATG Dynamo … Data extraction tool Possible solutions : A portal solution including a content and portal functionality A portal solution combined with a content management solution Mix of portal, content solutions and custom development Manages multi channel distribution Personalization Contribution to content Location of content Workflow (contribution process)

27 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 27 Typical technical architecture Internet Call Centre/ emails Call Centre Workstation Application Server Content Web Server Archives Firewall Market Data Feeds Research Customer Firewall Via Call Centre Operators Information requests External Systems DB Server Portal DB Server Content Application Server Portal News No necessary integration with back end systems of newspaper company Information feeds integrated with content management tool Information extraction can require specific extraction tools CRM tool can be added to portal functionality Customer DB

28 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 28 Information feeds Archives Market Data Feeds Research External Systems News Batch process, DB replication several times a day Archives Market Data Feeds Research News File for updates Files sent several times a day File sent or automatic interface Depending on frequency of updates in case of real time information, back up solutions are necessary (second direct data transmission line) Push technique : files sent Pull technique : connection to information provider server nFeeding techniques depend on frequency of updates and volumes of data

29 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 29 Technical enablers Case 2 : web banking site (transaction) Case 3 : life insurance site (servicing) Agenda Case 1 : a newspaper site (information)

30 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 30 Business model nProvide the bank’s retail clients the functionality to carry out most of their banking operations –Deposits –Account management –Loans –Credit cards nProvide the bank’s retail clients the functionality to carry out most of their equity and mutual funds transactions –Bonds, options, derivatives excluded –Some exotic markets excluded nBuild CRM tools to leverage on client information nRevenues model –Annual fees –Brokerage fees –Advertising

31 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 31 Products and services nConsultation –Accounts maintenance (status and operations) –Portfolios maintenance (status and operations)/transaction services –Loan maintenance –Credit cards maintenance nManagement services –Relationship management (CRM) –Personnalization –… nProduct support –Deposits –Loans –Credit cards –Brokerage

32 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 32 Front end applications S1 Virtual Financial Manager (VFM) VLM Virtual Loan Manager VIM Virtual Investment Manager VBM Virtual Bank Manager VCCM Virtual Credit Card Manager Retail Banking Products and Services Credit Card Services Loan Balance and Servicing Brokerage Services Integrated Applications Financial Management Functions Internet/ VRU

33 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 33 Customers - New - Current S1 Virtual Financial Manager (VFM) Products, Services and Operation Management MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL INFORMATION DELIVERY RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT SERVICE DELIVERY Functional Overview Back-end SystemsFront-end Systems Internet/ VRU ATM/POS/ CARDS Network Branch/Call Center Adaptive Layer Delivery Channels 3rd Party Processing: Securities Processing Clearing VBM VLM VCCM VIM

34 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 34 Technical Environment Bank core system End User Client Local Director Firewall CommServer Internal Network DB Server App Server Internet SSL H 9000 H H H Internal Network DB Server Workstation Cash Dispensers and other EMP Terminals Telephone Banking CommServer Front end Back end Internet user works on a local database which is a copy of the bank database (databases are replicated several times a day) Database replication necessary Real time (front end) versus batch systems (back end) Security reasons Back end could be outsourced to third party

35 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 35 The adaptive layer provides the linkage between the front-end and back-end systems ADAPTER Internet Account Origination - New customer and account information. Customer and Account Maintenance - Customer and account additions, modifications, and deletions. Deposit Account - Details of deposit accounts Deposit Transaction - Detail listing of deposit account transactions Credit Account - Details of credit accounts Credit Transaction - Detail listing of credit account transactions Credit Card Payment Reconciliation - Performance of credit card account maintenance, payments and debits Loan Account - Detail information of loan balances Funds Transfer - Creation, execution of review of funds transfers Payee - Maintenance and review of payee list Payment - Creation, execution and review of payments transactions and receive automatic payment requests from payment service. Payment Reconciliation - Perform customer and account maintenance

36 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 36 Integration of front end to back end Most legacy or client/server-based enterprise applications were not designed to inter-operate with external applications or browser-based; end- user clients Multiple and disparate Applications (custom, legacy, packaged) Platforms Databases Transaction processors Data entry points Versions of the same data Application systems that are built at different times by different groups operating independently of each other Incompatible business data formats Trading Partner CRM SCM Lab System SAP Legacy eAI Vendor Challenges a2a: Integration of back-end systems (SAP R/3 Legacy) a2a: Integration of front-end to back-end systems (Siebel SAP R/3) b2c: Integration of web applications with front- and back-end systems (self- service, customer interactions, etc.) b2b: Integration of applications across corporate or organizational boundaries (integration of business processes among trading partners, suppliers, distributors, etc.) eAI means Enterprise Integration

37 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 37 Traditional Integration Architecture Limited reusability Interfaces were typically built on an as-needed basis and were not built in a manner that allowed components to be reused Tight coupling of applications The interfaces were tightly coupled to the applications forcing changes to an application on one end of the interface to directly impact the other end of the interface Invasive integration approach requiring modifications to source applications Change to one application can affect all interfaces to/from that application Limited scalability of architecture across the enterprise Significant custom coding No centralized management or visibility of information flows and business rules Legacy Siebel SAP Internet People Soft Point-to-Point Custom Code Traditional middleware solutions facilitate the integration of individual applications and discrete transactions between them Point-to-Point integration with multiple interfacing methods

38 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 38 eAI Architecture App. A App. B App. C App. D App. E Message Broker App. B App. C App. A App. D App. E Message Brokers Network Centric Hub/Spoke or bus messaging architecture reduces # of connections Loose coupling of integrated applications Prebuilt adapters Reusable data/message transformation/formatting functions Near real-time and/or batch integration Interenterprise connections Central control of multistep business processes across multiple applications eAI solution is a set of technologies that enables the integration of end-to-end business processes and data (information) across disparate applications to increase the organization’s ability to respond and adapt to change by providing the following services: business process management, application connectivity, translation and transformation, communication middleware and message routing. Chaining together of discrete transactions in the form of a business process

39 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 39 eAI evolution 1980s: Legacy systems Departmental focus, but centralized platform and data Highly fragmented, after-the-fact view of the business 1990s: Client/Server, Packaged Applications, Netcentric Enterprise focus Partially integrated, after-the-fact view of the business Replaced much of existing IT investment 2000+: Enterprise Application Integration (eAI) Extended enterprise focus (B2B, B2C, etc.) Fully integrated, up-to-the-second visibility and control of the business Preservation of existing IT investment Integrate packaged, custom, legacy, and web applications eBusiness and B2B drive IT investments $248 $468 $892 $1.199 $1.564 $2.073 $2.544 0 500 1.000 1.500 2.000 2.500 3.000 1998199920002001200220032004 Millions of $ Source: Gartner Group Enterprise Application Integration Market Main uses of eAI% Get new applications into production quickly38% Move information beyond traditional confines20% Expand supplier and customer relationships18% Integrate a best-of-breed world14% Mergers and acquisitions10%

40 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 40 eAI components Business process level integration and management Business Process Management Prebuilt adapters to packaged applications, technology and custom adapter development kits Application Connectivity Message and data transformation and formatting Translation and Formatting Communications middleware and message routing Communications Middleware An eAI solution is composed of the following services: The Business Process Management layer is responsible for the definition and management of cross-application business processes across the enterprise and between enterprises. These services enable the communication not just of data, but also of the business process context of the data being sent to another application. The Communications Middleware component provides the architecture that implements various messaging models and route messages according message content and context. These services provide the connection among disparate resources, as well as security, queuing, and the functionality to reconcile network protocol differences. The Application Connectivity layer provides reusable, non-invasive connectivity with packaged software (e.g., ERP, third-party best-of- breed) and custom legacy systems enabled by reliable, event- driven messaging. The Transformation and Formatting layer is responsible for the conversion of data and message content and syntax to reconcile the differences between data from multiple heterogeneous systems and data sources. This layer is responsible for maintaining the information structure of the messages passed between systems and their meaning in a format that can be comprehended by another application.

41 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 41 Inter-enterprise integration Convergence of eAI and B2B The business case for a new web- application is greatly enhanced if the new application can be integrated into an overall distributed application architecture eCommerce integration involves establishing connectivity between an enterprise’s front-end, web-based sales engine and its back-office systems This kind of integration work is primarily intra- enterprise Inter-enterprise integration is externally focused and requires that an enterprise’s systems be connected with those of its business partners

42 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 42 Product Segmentation: Integration “Type” Each vendor initially focused on a specific integration area and has been expanding their capabilities into the other integration spaces Business to Consumer (B2C) Business to Business (B2B) Application to Application (A2A) EDI Mercator IBM NEON Viewlocity SeeBeyond webMethods* CrossWorlds Extricity Sterling Commerce Vitria Tibco *webMethods acquired Active to round-out their B2B-only offering. Active’s focus was only on A2A. Evolved Capabilities Initial Offering

43 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 43 eAI Vendors’ Capabilities Source: Gartner Group Strategic Analysis Report, September 2000 – R-11-5113 Niche PlayersVisionaries ChallengersLeaders Microsoft Sept, 2000 BEA Viewlocity Healthcare.com Sun Extricity GEIS Sterling Com. Vignette Candle Optio Sopra Sungard CrossWorlds Oracle Fujitsu-Siemens Software AG Level 8 Eclipsys/MSI Ability To Execute IBM web Methods Vitria NEON SeeBeyond Tibco SAGA Mercator Clients should typically consider vendors in this area Completeness of Vision most feature-rich, capable technologies Mapping of eAI vendors’ according to their capabilities % Market Share 14 12 7 5 5 45 Others

44 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 44 Technical enablers Case 2 : web banking site (transaction) Case 3 : life insurance site (servicing) Agenda Case 1 : a newspaper site (information)

45 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 45 Business model nNew virtual life insurance company, part of Royal Nederland (Allianz Group) nVirtual company concept: –Very few people working for the entity –All back offices activities have been outsourced to Accenture Insurance Services (ACIS): HRM, policy administration, finance, IT... –Brokers and banks are representing the distribution network nKey assets : –B2B extranet to larger Brokerage organizations –ACIS is available to other companies for outsourcing of their back office –Full STP (Straight-Through processing) Universal Level B2B Extranet

46 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 46 Reporting Financial administration Services Insurance Administration Process application Acceptance & policy printing Alterations Termination Prolongation & investment Commission calculation Support General Fund alterations Primary process Obliged reports: - Tax - Yearly reports - Actuarial reports Debtor management Creditor management In-/Excasso Consolidation Chart of accounts mgt. Service management IT operations IT applications mgt. Management Human Resources Office management New Business New products New services Legal changes

47 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 47 Technical Architecture F I R E W A LL Policy Express CIA Web Case Management Unipas C/S Exact C/S Interface Client relation database Reporting database Web Policyholder Broker To speed up the interaction between ACIS and the intermediary parties, internet initiatives are being developed. In addition to the capability to access workflow management (CIA) and to deliver policy applications electronically (Policy Express), the brokers are given the opportunity to acquire policy quotations on-line.

48 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 48 Life insurance application process Initial check Work Preparation Process Checklist Medical Acc. Process Standard Acceptance Process Medical Acceptance Requirements Medical Examination Renew Policy Quotation Medical Advice Intermediary Collect Confirmation & final docs. Follow-up open items Process & Issue Policy Medical Acceptance Report Rejection Process Universal Leven Medical Acceptance (Royal) Case Management Progress Notice Applic. Case Management One of the key process characteristics of the application handling at ACIS, is the fact that standard applications in compliance with the UL medical criteria can be processed without interference from the UL Medical Acceptance department. This considerably speeds up the processing procedures. INSURANCE UL / EXTERNALS

49 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 49 Workflow Management The Case Management system helps to keep track of the application status application, dealing with the parties involved in the process. In order to monitor the progress, it produces reports that measure the status against the agreed Service Level. C.M.: Application C.M.: Medical Acceptance Applicant Info: Client data from UniPas Application Milestone Dates: Application received Progress notice Letter of covering Mortgage passing Last document received Issuing policy Service Level benchmark Medical Milestone Dates: Medical checklist Medical examination Authorization Medical report Medical adviser Policy Application Status: Pipeline Passing Actual Alteration Rejected New Quotation Info: Mark-up percentage Restrictions Date new quotation Date client approval

50 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 50 What is Workflow ? Workflow can be broken down into 3 concepts:  Workflow describes how work moves through an organisation, i.e. workflows are an organisation’s business processes and the rules that drive and control the processes.  Workflow Automation is the electronic modelling of these business processes, i.e. mapping process flows and capturing rules and business logic.  Workflow Management is the ability to maintain and manage work in an operational environment, i.e. monitor, revise, balance, re-route work. In summary:  “The action of electronically modelling business processes so that resources and tasks can be coordinated, monitored and revised to improve productivity”

51 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 51 The Role of Workflow Automation Definition: The action of electronically modeling an entire business process, which can then be coordinated, monitored, and revised to improve productivity “Workflow” can be: Routed Paper The Business Flows of Corporation X A Systems Architecture Component/Service A Function of a Package Solution (e.g. ERP) A Workflow Management System Functions: Offer a tool set through which to MODEL entire business processes Provide application services which automatically COORDINATE manual and automated process functions Maintain extensive statistics from which to MONITOR process performance Provide a flexible framework for management to dynamically REVISE business processes Process Management 1] Route Building routes work items to the next required activity 2] Rules Building provides the intelligence for determining process paths for a work item, based on the process state and the outcome of previous tasks 3] Roles Management defines a user or a workgroup’s responsibilities and tasks in the process 4] Queue Management provides access and control of work queues or “in-baskets” 5] Monitor / Reporting Functions

52 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 52 High Level Rules for Workflow Workflow Technology is Value Added when The Enterprise Has: Well defined (modelable) business processes Static business processes Few (or consistent) exceptions Delays occur due to process transfer time Delays due to business process steps being separated by physical distance Tracking or auditing of work in progress is a priority …and can result in: Increased Productivity Workers focus on value-adding activities Directs users to high priority work Automates routing of work Concurrent access capabilities Reduced Costs Reduced manual effort Reduced administrative effort Improved resource utilization Reduced transfer time between activities Increased Control Automated audit trail Improved accountability Exception handling Faster communication Faster decision making Monitors task and process costs Increased Flexibility Improved information access Maximize decision making capability at point of decision Single point of process modification Dynamic reprioritization and redistribution of work Powerful Statistics

53 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 53 Conceptual Workflow Architecture Workflow Participant Management Process Definitions Activity Definitions Resource Definitions Milestone Definitions Rule Definitions Workflow Procedures Database Workflow Process Owner Services User Workflow Services Workflow Engine Workflow APIs Manufacturing Human Resources Marketing Finance / Accting Customer Service Order Entry Manufacturing Human Resources Marketing Finance / Accting Customer Service Order Entry RDBMS Business Applications Process Statistics Database Queue Data Process Instance Data Work Item Reassignment Resource Scheduling Management Reporting Application Workflow Services Batch Processes Asynch Processes Process Initiation Performance Support (Online Help) ManufacturingFinance / Accting Marketing Order EntryCustomer Services Human Resources Desktop Apps. Process Initiation Process Review Message Box Worklist Handler Workflow Systems Administration Resource Maintenance Process Rule Maintenance Process Mapping Event Manager Rule & Route Management Instance Management Queue Management Alert Management ILLUSTRATIVE

54 V.1.0 Solvay Business School Technologies de l’information et de La communication 54 What components make up a Workflow Solution? Workflow solutions are made up of several basic components necessary to design, build and execute workflow management systems: 1.Process Design Methodology –a workflow system should be designed with the process flow as the focal-point –typically, an organisation would use their own standards/methodology 2.Process Mapping Tool –draws a map representing process flows –vendors typically offer a graphical mapping tool to “visualise” the process flow 3.Rules Builder –defines routing procedures, security, priority, alert notifications, etc. –usually integrated with the process mapping tool 4.Workflow Engine manages the process flow between client applications, server applications, users, data stores. moves work items along the process maps central point of coordination and management 5.Workflow Administrator Utility –run-time component which gathers workflow statistics and generates reports, e.g. processing times, queue volumes, workgroup volumes, alert notifications etc..


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